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These Lessons From Fort Leonard Wood Could Help Kansas City Transfer Students Succeed

Once a week, Waynesville High School in south-central Missouri resounds with the celebratory air of a football game. The marching band has just completed a lap of the hallways, blaring the school’s theme song, “Eye of the Tiger.” This school rocks with spirit, even though most of its 1,500 students didn’t grow up in Waynesville, and most of them won’t be staying long.

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Les Miles is 65, but he’s not prepared to dig into his retirement savings nor the $1.5 million buyout settlement he agreed to last week with LSU football.

That buyout, which was far less than what LSU had agreed to pay Miles through 2023, paved the way for him to accept a new challenge: turn around the moribund football program at the University of Kansas. 

As flames consume parts of California, an unexpected group of firefighters has put their lives at risk to protect communities: prison inmates.

For $2 per day — and another $1 an hour when battling fires — qualified inmates can volunteer to help authorities combat fires.

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Missouri News and Politics

Les Miles is 65, but he’s not prepared to dig into his retirement savings nor the $1.5 million buyout settlement he agreed to last week with LSU football.

That buyout, which was far less than what LSU had agreed to pay Miles through 2023, paved the way for him to accept a new challenge: turn around the moribund football program at the University of Kansas. 

Rising concerns about gentrification, eviction and long-overlooked disparities in the quality of housing in Kansas City, Missouri, have created soaring interest in addressing housing problems, particularly on the city's east side.

For Eric Schwarz, a vacant building is more than a culmination of neglect and decay; it’s a treasure trove.

“Some of these materials will never be produced again,” said Schwarz, executive director of the St. Louis salvage nonprofit Refab. “Those handmade bricks, we’re not going to see those anymore.”

Refab has “deconstructed” more than 100 buildings in St. Louis, a process that involves carefully dismantling a property and reselling the materials for new projects. The nonprofit recently received a first-of-its-kind contract from the St. Louis Development Corporation as part of a new push to deconstruct more buildings slated for demolition.

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Project Will Renovate Hannibal's Riverfront

Nov 16, 2018

City leaders in the historic northeast Missouri hometown of Mark Twain have been talking about renovating the area along Twain's beloved Mississippi River for three decades, and now, that work is about to begin.

The city council recently approved a $6.6 million contract for riverfront renovations. When the project is completed in late 2019 the riverfront will feature a new boat ramp and docking sites for two large riverboats as well as the local excursion boat, which is named after Twain. 

The new riverfront also will have a new wall, sidewalks, restrooms and lighting.

Two small airlines are protesting the price tag for the new single terminal project at Kansas City International Airport.

Executives at Spirit and Allegiant airlines outlined their concerns in letters to the Kansas City Council Airport Committee, citing the $1.6 billion project price and cost-sharing issues.

Voters approved the project last year, but the cost is supposed to be borne by airlines that use the airport. The project will create a single terminal to replace the three horseshoe-style buildings at Kansas City's main airport.

Kinder Institute, University of Missouri

Darren Hellwege visits with Ethics & Public Policy Center analyst Henry Olsen and Georgetown University historian andDissent editor Michael Kazin on the topic of political and historical populism. The two spoke on the University of Missouri campus in an event sponsored by the Kinder Institute. 

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The struggling nation of Yemen is on the brink of what could become the worst famine the world has seen in decades.

The country’s economy has collapsed amid a three-year-old war between a Saudi-led coalition and Houthi rebels. About 8.4 million are what the UN calls “severely food insecure” and at risk of starvation.

To make matters worse, it’s increasingly clear that the humanitarian disaster in Yemen isn’t an unintended side effect of the war - but a deliberate effort to starve the population.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a closer look at the three-year-old crisis in Yemen - and why more isn’t being done to end the world’s worst humanitarian disaster.