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What Kansas And Missouri Lawmakers Think About Trump's Border Emergency Declaration

This story has been updated to include statements from Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley and Rep. Sam Graves. For the most part, the reactions of Kansas' and Missouri's congressional delegation to President Donald Trump's emergency declaration Friday fell along party lines.

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Missouri News and Politics

At the end of last year, most telecom analysts thought the proposed $26 billion merger between Sprint and T-Mobile was coasting towards an easy approval from the federal government.

But since then, opposition forces have surfaced, prominent Democrats are taking it on as a cause, and the deal’s approval chances now appear to be at 50-50. An analysis by Bloomberg called it "anybody's guess."

The movie "BlacKkKlansman," a satire about race in America, is up for six Academy Awards — including one for Kansas filmmaker Kevin Willmott, who is among the nominees for best adapted screenplay.

It's based on the true story of Ron Stallworth, the first black officer in the Colorado Springs Police Department, who infiltrated the local chapter of the Ku Kux Klan in the 1970s. So viewers might be surprised to learn that one of the most poignant scenes is actually a true story from Willmott's childhood growing up in Junction City, Kansas.

Calling all arts entrepreneurs in the St. Louis region: the third-annual stARTup Creative Competition is underway. A $20,000 prize is at stake.

The Arts and Education Council devised the contest to give a boost to new ventures.

Either one winner will receive $20,000, or two will split it. The prize also includes work space in Arts and Education Council’s arts incubator at the Centene Center for the Arts in Grand Center, including internet access and other logistical support.

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What do you eat in space? How do you sleep in space?

And just what does one do all day long in space?

Children from the Georgetown Day School in Washington D.C., recently had a chance to ask their most burning questions to NASA astronaut Anne McClain.

They are roughly the same age that McClain was when on her first day of preschool she announced that she wanted to become an astronaut.

At the end of last year, most telecom analysts thought the proposed $26 billion merger between Sprint and T-Mobile was coasting towards an easy approval from the federal government.

But since then, opposition forces have surfaced, prominent Democrats are taking it on as a cause, and the deal’s approval chances now appear to be at 50-50. An analysis by Bloomberg called it "anybody's guess."

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Police Chief Ken Burton's Tenure - A Timeline

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Courtesy of Art Smith

Talking Horse Production’s newest play might be considered challenging. That’s because it tackles hard subjects: race, implicit bias and prejudice.

 

The play, titled “White People,” is a series of monologues from three ordinary Americans. Talking Horse describes it as a “candid, brutally honest meditation on race and language in our culture.” The play is written by Tony award-winning playwright J.T. Rogers, who is originally from Columbia. His play “Oslo” is currently being performed at the Repertory Theatre in St. Louis.

Cameron Kirby/Unsplash

Missouri's largest utility company plans to spend $6.3 billion on grid improvements over the next five years.

Ameren Missouri filed its plan with the Missouri Public Service Commission on Thursday. The highlights include installing 800,000 "smart meters" through 2023 as part of an effort to give customers more control over electrical costs, and a $1 billion expenditure on wind energy in 2020.

Nathan Lawrence

Sen. Josh Hawley has been subpoenaed to answer questions about his handling of Missouri's open records law while he was the state's attorney general. 

The Cole County Circuit Court issued the subpoena Monday as part of a lawsuit against Gov. Mike Parson's office.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Missouri is getting hit with another winter blast today, causing treacherous driving conditions and leading some school districts to cancel classes.

The National Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory Friday for much of Missouri, except the extreme northeast corner. 

Snow began falling midmorning with accumulations of up to 5 inches expected. In some areas, sleet and freezing rain also are possible, making roads dangerous.