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Global Journalist: Calvo-Roth Broke Barriers for Women Journalists

On this week's show, a look at the life of a pioneering female journalist. Fortuna Calvo-Roth was born in 1934 to a Jewish family in Paris, but was raised in Lima, Peru. There she fell in love with the news business during World War II - and came to admire American newspapers like the New York Times and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. So she left Peru and came to the Missouri School of Journalism in the 1950s, where she managed to graduate with honors at just age 19. Despite facing discrimination, she went on to a distinguished career as a correspondent for a number of major Latin American newspapers and later as news executive for the Brazilian publishing group Vision Inc. Yet journalism was just one chapter of her career - she went on to enjoy success as a theatrical producer, a publisher and as the co-founder of an audiobook label.

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The president promised to revolutionize France when he was elected in 2017, and his plans economic overhaul seemed on track even two months ago. But many experts say Macron is already finished.

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Missouri News and Politics

In the 1950s, SuEllen Fried got a call asking if she'd like to teach the cha-cha to psychiatric patients at the Osawatomie State Hospital.

She'd danced in St. Louis's Muny Opera as a teen and she'd made plans to move to New York to pursue a career in dance on Broadway. But at the last minute, she fell in love, moved to Kansas City, got married and started a family instead.

The top people who handled security for the Metro Transit agency are out of a job.

Bi-State Development President Taulby Roach confirmed the departures on Friday but provided no other details, including the names of the two officials.

St. Louis agencies and community organizations that work with the region’s homeless population are calling on city and county residents to volunteer time and donate supplies.

The groups are stretching resources to keep people warm and fed as weekend forecasts warn of more sleet, snow and freezing temperatures.

Read More News From Across Missouri

Police Chief Ken Burton's Tenure - A Timeline

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Rough Cut (Part 1)

16 hours ago

Directors Mo Scarpelli, Hannah Jayanti and Elizabeth Lo all attended the 2018 Rough Cut Retreat; where they got feedback on early versions of their films. We checked in with them about 6 months later to get an intimate view of the filmmaking process in real time. In this episode, we’ll be talking about the cutting room floor. How do you decide what to exclude? How do you edit to re-frame your story? And what happens when you realize you don’t have enough?

Tried & True's inaugural episode features a conversation between Francisco Cantú (The Line Becomes A River) and Reyna Grande (The Distance Between Us), about their experiences as a U.S. border patrol agent (Cantú) and undocumented immigrant (Grande), and how and why their writing about borders is a perennially hot topic. This interview was recorded on-site at the NonfictionNow Conference in Phoenix, AZ in Nov. 2018.

Sebastián Martínez Valdivia / KBIA

The Missouri Department of Transportation advised drivers Thursday to stay off the roads over the weekend ahead of a forecast winter storm and below-freezing temperatures.

The below-freezing temperatures may make chemicals that are used to treat roads less effective. Cleanup from the storm may take longer than the previous weekend's, the department warned. Wind gusts could cause drifting.

The city of Columbia warned on Wednesday that the storm could affect travel, power and city services. 

"This weekend, our country is emphasizing values like justice and equality and freedom as we anticipate celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday. And I want to share this little, short Missouri history story because I think some of those values surface as we hear this story." -- LARRY BROWN on why he's sharing the story, "Mule Shoes, Boodlers, Holy Joe and the Missouri Idea"  January 18, 2019

On this week's show, a look at the life of a pioneering female journalist. Fortuna Calvo-Roth was born in 1934 to a Jewish family in Paris, but was raised in Lima, Peru. There she fell in love with the news business during World War II - and came to admire American newspapers like the New York Times and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

So she left Peru and came to the Missouri School of Journalism in the 1950s, where she managed to graduate with honors at just age 19. Despite facing discrimination, she went on to a distinguished career as a correspondent for a number of major Latin American newspapers and later as news executive for the Brazilian publishing group Vision Inc.

Yet journalism was just one chapter of her career - she went on to enjoy success as a theatrical producer, a publisher and as the co-founder of an audiobook label.