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School shootings have taken a terrible human toll. They have also been a boon to the business of security technology.

Over the summer, Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox saw an array of items on display at an expo in Orlando, Fla. He and fellow reporter Steven Rich went on to investigate whether any of the technology being promoted and sold really helps save lives.

One minute, Seamus Hughes was reading the book Dragons Love Tacos to his son. A few minutes later, after putting him to bed, Hughes was back on his computer, stumbling on what could be one of the most closely guarded secrets within the U.S. government: that the Justice Department may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

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On the morning of his 23rd birthday, Leonel Salas is just getting off the fireline after battling the Woolsey fire all night in Southern California.

"[We] can't get any rest while we're on the lines," he says.

He's exhausted after working for 24 hours, but relieved to be at the base camp in Camarillo where there are hot meals, sleeping pods and mobile showers.

Salas and his crew have been on the job for over a week now. When he got the call to head out to the fire he didn't even have the chance to say goodbye to his parents.

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Updated at 10:00 p.m. ET

President Trump visited fire-ravaged areas of California on Saturday, meeting with people affected by the wildfires. At least 76 people were killed in the Camp Fire in Northern California, and nearly 1,300 people have been reported missing, making it the most destructive and deadly wildfire in California state history.

Andrew Gillum ended his bid to become the first African-American governor of Florida on Saturday, conceding the race to his Republican rival, former Rep. Ron DeSantis.

"R.J. and I wanted to take a moment to congratulate Mr. DeSantis on becoming the next governor of the great state of Florida," Gillum said in a Facebook video with his wife at his side. "This has been the journey of our lives."

President Trump shot down reports on Saturday that his administration was considering extraditing a Pennsylvania-based foe of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in order to diffuse tensions between Turkey and Saudi Arabia.

Erdogan says Fethullah Gulen, a Turkish cleric who has been living in Pennsylvania since the late 1990s, was involved in a failed coup in 2016. The government has requested the U.S. send him back to Turkey.

Missing Argentine Submarine Found In Deep Ocean Ravine

11 hours ago

An Argentine submarine has been found about a half-mile below the ocean's surface, almost a year after it disappeared with 44 crew members on board.

Ocean Infinity, a Houston-based company, sent minisubmarines to scour the ocean floor for the submarine and were on the last day of their search when they received notification of a 197-foot-long geological formation in a deep ocean ravine, about 700 miles east of the Argentine city of Puerto Madryn. Photo images revealed it to be the submarine, the ARA San Juan.

This week was one of the most chaotic in British politics in recent decades. After more than a year of negotiations, Prime Minister Theresa May presented a Brexit withdrawal agreement from the European Union that seemed to unite British politicians across the spectrum in their hatred for it.

The quarterly series “The Essentials” at the Moxie Cinema, 305 S. Campbell, takes place throughout the year, showcasing the “essential” films everyone should see on the big screen, organized under themes such as directors, actors, genres, and eras or movements.  This quarter it’s “Classic Comedies”, featuring some of the most iconic comedy films of the 1930s, 40s and 50s.  Mike Stevens from the Moxie stopped by to talk about the series. 

Updated at 9:05 p.m. ET

The CIA has concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of outspoken Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, according to media reports.

Forty years is a long time to spend in one place, doing one thing. Especially when the goal is to ruffle feathers.

But that's what the Unicorn Theatre's producing artistic director Cynthia Levin has done, turning an anti-establishment theater into an established venue.

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Some weeks, I just kind of wade through the news to be able to say time for sports.

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For nearly a month, the two sisters — then ages 17 and 12 — traveled by road from their home in El Salvador to the southern border of the United States. They had no parent or relatives with them on that difficult journey in the fall of 2016 — just a group of strangers and their smugglers.

Ericka and her younger sister Angeles started out in multiple cars, Ericka remembers. "In Mexico, it was buses. And we changed buses very often." (NPR is using only the sisters' middle names to protect their identity as they await a decision on their application for asylum in the U.S.)

It used to be you would sign on the bottom line, whether it was a check or a credit card receipt or even a love letter. But the art of the signature has become less important and less practiced, and that has meant less certainty for elections officials in several states who are still counting votes from the Nov. 6 midterm elections.

Those officials are trying verify that the signatures required on mail-in, provisional, absentee and military ballots match the signature that voters have on file with the board of elections.

This week in the Russia investigations: President Trump says he, and not his lawyers, completed written questions for the special counsel. Now, the ball is back in Robert Mueller's court.

Paper jam

President Trump says he has finished his open-book, take-home exam.

Working in Bolivia's mines is a family business.

That's what Italian photographer Simone Francescangeli saw when he traveled to the city of Potosí of about 250,000 to document the daily lives of miners. They're part of a centuries-old enterprise to extract silver, tin, zinc and gold from the mountains. He was struck by the harsh and sometimes dangerous conditions the miners work in — and by the number of children he saw working in the mines. Some were teenagers. One youngster said he was 11 years old.

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New rules on college campus sexual assault and harassment

Editor's note: This story contains some disturbing details that may be upsetting.

Since the deadly Camp Fire barreled into the Northern California town of Paradise, Jim Knaver, who is in his 60s, has barely slept or eaten. The elementary school teacher's days have been consumed by visits to evacuation centers and hospitals as he searches for his 67-year-old disabled wife.

A year ago, Facebook started using artificial intelligence to scan people's accounts for danger signs of imminent self-harm.

Facebook Global Head of Safety Antigone Davis is pleased with the results so far.

"In the very first month when we started it, we had about 100 imminent-response cases," which resulted in Facebook contacting local emergency responders to check on someone. But that rate quickly increased.

Segment 1: Kansas city of 10,000 has survived its hospital closing and may be the model for other rural communities. 

Jim McKelvey has come to the rescue of the St. Louis maker movement.

Today, the serial entrepreneur officially opened MADE, a 32,000-square-foot building at 5127 Delmar Blvd., with tools and machines for makers, artists, designers and entrepreneurs.

This interview will be on St. Louis on the Air at noon on Monday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh will discuss the fiscal consequences that farmers face as a result of recent trade disputes between the Trump administration and China.

Joining the discussion will be Blake Hurst, president of the Missouri Farm Bureau, and Pat Westhoff, director of the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

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When San Francisco's Alcatraz prison was completed in 1934, it was believed to be impenetrable.

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UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: (Unintelligible).

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Screenwriter William Goldman died last night at the age of 87. He's responsible for the scripts for more than 30 movies, including classics like "Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid" and "The Princess Bride." NPR's Neda Ulaby has our remembrance.

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