Marissanne Lewis-Thompson | KBIA

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson joined the KRCU team in November 2015 as a feature reporter. She was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri where she grew up watching a lot documentaries on PBS, which inspired her to tell stories. In May 2015, she graduated from the University of Missouri with a Bachelor of Journalism degree in Convergence Journalism. Marissanne comes to KRCU from KBIA, where she worked as a reporter, producer and supervising editor while covering stories on arts and culture, education and diversity. 

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill gave an emotional farewell speech Thursday, thanking her family, staff and supporters, but also criticizing the Senate, saying the legislative body has become dysfunctional.

“We have too many embarrassing uncles in the United States Senate,” she said from the institution’s floor. “Lots of embarrassing stuff. The United States Senate is no longer the world’s greatest deliberative body. And everybody needs to quit saying it until we recover from this period of polarization and the fear of political consequences of tough votes.”

Save-A-Lot’s corporate headquarters is the latest tenant at The Crossings at Northwest.

The grocery retailer made the decision to move its headquarters from Earth City to St. Ann in April. Kevin Proctor, the chief investment officer at Save-A-Lot, said the purpose was to create space that better fit the company’s needs.

“We had outgrown the existing office,” Proctor said, “but we also lack in the existing offices a lot of the facilities that we have here in the new office, which we need as a business going forward.”

Deer hunters are helping out Missouri families again this year.

Since 1992, the Share the Harvest Program has collected more than 3.5 million pounds of venison from deer hunters across the state.

The program aims to lessen the burden of food insecurity for people by distributing deer meat to hundreds of food banks throughout the St. Louis region and statewide. It’s a collaborative effort between the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Conservation Federation of Missouri, meat processors, hunters and local organizations.

Immigrants, asylum seekers and refugees had the opportunity to experience their first Thanksgiving in St. Louis on Tuesday, a few days early.

The annual event held by the International Institute of St. Louis included games, raffle tickets and a group rendition of the classic folk song, “This Land is Your Land.”

Roadways and airports are expected to be busier than usual this Thanksgiving holiday.

The AAA Club of Missouri anticipate more than 1.1 million residents to travel over a 10-day period covering Thanksgiving. That’s an increase of roughly 5 percent from last year.

Residents in the Shrewsbury area will have to wait a bit longer for their ramp on Interstate 44 to reopen.

The Missouri Department of Transportation announced Tuesday that it has suspended construction on the eastbound bridge of I-44 over the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad by Shrewsbury.

The halt comes after inspectors found a "greater-than-normal" amount of cracking on the westbound bridge on I-44 that just wrapped up construction last year.

On the surface, Mikaylah Norfolk is like most kids her age. She likes to play with her three-story Barbie Dreamhouse, dress up her dolls, hang out with her friends and do arts and crafts.

But the 9-year-old Florissant resident is also the founder of an anti-bullying organization.

We Rise Up 4 Kids aims to help kids deal with the trauma of bullying, while also providing mental health resources.

An organization that aims to help youth deal with the trauma of bullying will host its kickoff event on Saturday.

Mikaylah Norfolk of Florissant founded We Rise Up 4 Kids in June after experiencing intense verbal and physical bullying by a classmate at age 8. Mikaylah says she decided to turn her own trauma into a way to help other kids.

St. Louis County voters will soon be able to review election results to determine how different areas voted on select candidates and issues.

Starting with the Nov. 6 general election, voters will be able to use an election-results mapping tool to examine regional preferences. Those results likely will be available two weeks after the election. County officials aim to help people interested in regional politics.

A pilot of the interactive tool on the St. Louis County Board of Elections website uses results from the August 2018 primary election to show voter preferences in select races — including county executive and prosecutor, and on ballot issues.

The company behind a hyperloop transportation system between St. Louis and Kansas City is touting a new feasibility study.

The study, released on Wednesday, was done by the Kansas City-based engineering, consulting and construction company Black & Veatch. It found the hyperloop would be an economic boon for the state, saving Missourians $410 million a year.

WOW Air announced Monday that it will suspend its service out of St. Louis Lambert International Airport to Iceland starting Jan. 7.

The Icelandic airline began offering non-stop flights from Lambert to Iceland’s Keflavik International Airport in May.

Airport officials said in a statement Monday that demand had been strong for the flights.

Special motorized chairs are making it possible for people with physical disabilities to enjoy Missouri’s state parks.

Action Track Chairs, offered by the Missouri Department of Conservation, have special wheels and controls that enable users to navigate rugged trails and waterways.

Guy Vogt, the assistant outdoor education center manager at August A. Busch shooting range in Defiance, said with the fall hunting season in full swing, the chairs are equipped to do a lot.

A year after the Las Vegas shooting that left dozens dead and hundreds injured, Manchester United Methodist Church held its own public discussion on gun violence throughout the St. Louis region.

What some expected to be a heated debate turned out to be a peaceful discussion on how Moms Demand Action and the U.S. Attorney of the Eastern District of Missouri are working to curb gun violence.

Joshua Williams always stood out in a crowd. Even during the tense and chaotic 2014 Ferguson protests, Williams could easily be spotted in the signature red hoodie that he rarely went without.

Williams was 18 years old at the time, the same age as Michael Brown when he was shot and killed by police — and old enough to leave home against his mother’s wishes to join the front lines to protest Brown’s death.

After 20 years of selling and using meth, 38-year-old Andy Moss turned his life around. He got off drugs and got a good job. Next step: he wanted to fix his teeth, which had disintegrated, leaving nerves exposed.


Marisanne Lewis-Thompson / for Harvest Public Media

 

Driving along rough and muddy gravel roads next to what was once a rich soybean field, farmer Adam Thomas gazes out on an upended mess of tubes, wheels and hoses from a nearby farmer’s irrigation system.

Nowadays, his farmland in Miller City, Illinois, looks like a scene from “Lawrence of Arabia.” Layer upon layer of sand as much as 4-feet deep covered nearly 100 acres. Large sand deposits, fallen trees and fragments of a damaged road wreaked havoc on his once fertile farm ground.

Heavy rainfall and swollen rivers have caused major flooding in Missouri and southern Illinois, leading to voluntary evacuations and road closures. The governors of both states have declared a state of emergency, and water levels on the Mississippi River shattered records. While this story is still developing, here are the main things you need to know about the recent floods.