Global Journalist | KBIA

Global Journalist

Thursdays 6:30pm-7:00pm

Global Journalist is a half-hour weekly discussion of international news by a panel of journalists from around the world. Hosted by Jason McLure, Global Journalist airs at 6:30 P.M. on KBIA.

Check out the video and more at the Global Journalist website.

On this week's show, a look at the life of a pioneering female journalist. Fortuna Calvo-Roth was born in 1934 to a Jewish family in Paris, but was raised in Lima, Peru. There she fell in love with the news business during World War II - and came to admire American newspapers like the New York Times and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

So she left Peru and came to the Missouri School of Journalism in the 1950s, where she managed to graduate with honors at just age 19. Despite facing discrimination, she went on to a distinguished career as a correspondent for a number of major Latin American newspapers and later as news executive for the Brazilian publishing group Vision Inc.

Yet journalism was just one chapter of her career - she went on to enjoy success as a theatrical producer, a publisher and as the co-founder of an audiobook label.


AP Photo

It started with a story in the Indianapolis Star about executives at USA Gymnastics failing to forward allegations of sexual abuse against young gymnasts to law enforcement.

That led to first one, then two, then a dozen and now hundreds to come forward with allegations of sexual abuse against gymnastics team physician Larry Nassar. Nassar was sentenced to up to 175 years of jail last year.

The gymnastics' group's former CEO and a former trainer have also been arrested on separate charges. Facing dozens of lawsuits, USA Gymnastics filed for bankruptcy in December. The fallout also hit Michigan State University, where Nassar worked in the College of Osteophathic Medicine. 

On this special edition of Global Journalist, a look behind the scenes of the Star's investigation of USA Gymnastics with reporter Marisa Kwiatkowski


AP Photo

  Though it's receded from the headlines, the war in Ukraine grinds on nearly five years after it began.

Among the hardest hit are the estimated 1.5 million people internally displaced by fighting between Ukrainian troops and Russian-backed forces.

On a special edition of Global Journalist, we get an on the ground look at the lives of Ukrainians struggling to rebuild their lives after fleeing their homes. We also hear from a Ukrainian journalist and an American scholar on the prospects for some of the victims of Europe's forgotten war.

 


AP Photo

In late June, the first Saudi women to legally drive a car in the kingdom started their engines and took off down the road.

The lifting of Saudi Arabia’s ban on female drivers was a step forward for women. But it’s just one of a number of recent steps forward for women’s rights in the Arab world. Countries like Tunisia, Jordan and Lebanon have passed laws ending legal loopholes that let rapists off the hook for marrying their victim.

Some countries have rolled back exemptions for those who commit so-called “honor killings” of female family members.

Still, many women’s rights advocates are only cautiously optimistic. In some countries, laws aimed at helping women aren’t enforced. Nor are public attitudes toward women’s rights necessarily becoming more progressive. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at women's rights in the Arab world.


Courtesy

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an extended interview with award-winning foreign correspondent and author Peter Hessler.

In 1996, the U.S. Peace Corps sent the Columbia, Mo. native to a city in central China to teach English at a teacher's college. During that period, few Westerners had spent much time in the city, and Hessler's experiences became fodder for his widely acclaimed 2001 memoir, "River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze."

Hessler later returned to China and spent seven years as a correspondent for the New Yorker, becoming one of the most well-known foreign journalists in the country. Hessler went on to publish three other books, win a MacArthur "genius" grant, and eventually moved his family to Egypt to continue reporting for the New Yorker.


European Pressphoto Agency

The the practice of outdoor defecation is a major cause of diarrheal diseases that kill about 2,200 children a day - more than die from HIV/AIDS, malaria or tuberculosis combined

As of 2015, an estimated 900 million people relieved themselves outside, according to the UN. More than half of them – around a half billion people – were in India.

In response, the Indian government launched what Bloomberg News called “the largest toilet-building campaign in human history.” According to government figures, this “Clean India” campaign has built more than 90 million new latrines and toilets in the past four years.

Still, despite the toilet boom, public health experts say there’s much to do to end the practice of open defecation - and the problem goes far beyond a shortage of latrines.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’ll examine the issue in India as well as Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s $20 billion campaign to end the problem by 2019.


EPA

Over the past two years, Tanzania's President John Magufuli has led what critics say is a broad assault on human rights, including freedom of expression.

His government has suspended the publication of newspapers that criticized him and attempted to silence critical bloggers and members of the opposition. It's even detained and interrogated researchers from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Also targeted: members of the East African nation's LGBT community, who have faced criminal prosecution and stepped-up intimidation.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Magufuli’s crackdown on civil liberties in Tanzania.


AP Photo

Thousands of children have been used as soldiers in at least 18 countries around the world in the past two years.

For the children who survive, the trauma of war can have long-lasting impacts.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’re going to hear about how two aid groups are trying to address this issue in South Sudan and Uganda. We'll also hear from two ex-child soldiers about how the trauma of fighting in wars shaped their lives.


U.S. Air Force

Earlier this year, Vice President Mike Pence renewed a call by the Trump Administration for the U.S. military to create a “Space Force.”

The White House’s effort comes in response to advances by China, Russia and other countries in space. It also raises the question as to whether or not the move might accelerate the militarization of space.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how militaries have and could operate outside our atmosphere - and what that may mean for the future of warfare.


AP Photo

The struggling nation of Yemen is on the brink of what could become the worst famine the world has seen in decades.

The country’s economy has collapsed amid a three-year-old war between a Saudi-led coalition and Houthi rebels. About 8.4 million are what the UN calls “severely food insecure” and at risk of starvation.

To make matters worse, it’s increasingly clear that the humanitarian disaster in Yemen isn’t an unintended side effect of the war - but a deliberate effort to starve the population.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a closer look at the three-year-old crisis in Yemen - and why more isn’t being done to end the world’s worst humanitarian disaster.


AP Photo

In late October, Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad issued a directive to state officials: raise the minimum age for marriage to eighteen years old.

The move came after a huge public outcry earlier this year after a 41-year-old Malay man married an 11-year-old Thai girl named Ayu. The man, Che Abdul Karim Che Abdul Hamid, was a successful rubber trader. Ayu, who became his third wife, was the daughter of an employee who worked for a family business.

The case has highlighted the issue of child marriage in Southeast Asia, a part of the world where modernization and rapid economic development has sometimes co-existed uneasily with traditional religious and cultural practices.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at child marriage in the region, where Islamic law, local traditions and human trafficking all contribute to the phenomenon.


Break Free/Creative Commons/Flickr

Climate change has brought more intense storms and worsening “king tides” that flood through homes and gardens in the low-lying Pacific island nation of Kiribati. Even more critically, the encroaching seas are threatening the country’s dwindling supplies of freshwater.

Island nations like Kiribati have been among those most damaged already by climate change - and their situation is likely to grow worse.

Nearly all of these emissions, of course, are generated in large countries thousands of miles away from Kiribati.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss the challenges for island nations like Kiribati threatened by climate change - and the chances that its people will successfully adapt to them. 


AP Photo

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at eugenics laws and forcible sterilization in both Japan and the U.S. – two countries with a surprisingly recent legacy of sterilizing people against their will.

In Japan, a postwar eugenics law in force until 1996 cleared the way for the government to sterilize 25,000 people deemed unfit to reproduce. In the U.S., 32 states passed laws allowing authorities to sterilize people without their consent - and as many as 60,000 people were forcibly sterilized, some as late as the 1970s.

Hundreds of the victims of these policies are still alive, and in many cases are still waiting for apologies and compensation from the governments that took away their ability to reproduce.


Christine Blasey Ford was 100 percent certain Judge Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school. Kavanaugh was 100 percent certain he didn’t.

But one figure that jumped out during Kavanaugh's recent U.S. Supreme Court confirmation hearings was this: 23 percent. That’s the percentage of women in the U.S. Senate, the body that voted to narrowly confirm him. Indeed the U.S. ranks 103rd in the world in the share of women in national legislatures – behind countries like Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and Iraq.

One major reason why is that more than 60 countries have passed quota laws for female candidates in the past 30 years. In many others nations, political parties have adopted voluntary quotas for women.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at gender quotas in international politics and whether they've worked as intended.


AP Photo

Just over a year ago Myanmar security forces were wrapping up a massive offensive against the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority. 

In a matter of weeks, more than 720,000 Rohingya were forced to flee to neighboring Bangladesh in what the head of Myanmar’s military called a “clearance operation” in the country’s Rakhine State. A recent U.N. report has shed new light on what happened in Myanmar, and accused the military of murder, mass rape and torture. It also called for several of Myanmar's top generals to be prosecuted for genocide and crimes against humanity.  On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at whether the UN report may galvanize the international community to hold Myanmar's generals to account and what the prospects are for the 1 million Rohingya now living in refugee camps in Bangladesh.

AP Photo

Agreements with countries like Turkey, Sudan and Libya have helped the European Union dramatically cut the flow of migrants to the continent.

But some of these partnerships have generated controversy amid concerns that the Libyan and Sudanese forces helping Europe keep migrants away are involved in the illegal detention, torture and trafficking of asylum-seekers.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the costs and benefits of the EU's immigration policy and its efforts to stop would-be migrants hundreds of miles from Europe's borders.


AP Photo

Poland was once a model democracy in eastern Europe. Yet since 2015 when the populist Law and Justice party (PiS) won both the presidency and lower house of parliament, there have been big changes.

Law and Justice has sought to force out judges deemed unsympathetic, shunned refugees and chilled the independent press – while tapping into resentment of the country's political elite and the European Union. The moves have strained ties with the EU, which has begun a process that could lead to sanctions on Poland and even the loss of its voting rights in the European bloc.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges for democracy in Poland.


U.N. Photo

The Central African Republic is one of the toughest places to live in the world.

Since the start of a civil war in 2013, a total of 14 different warring militias now control parts of the country. The central government governs little but the capital Bangui. The United Nations says the country has the lowest level of human development in the world.

Conflict over control of diamond mines and other natural resources has helped fuel the conflict, and a U.N. peacekeeping mission has failed to halt the violence. Into the fray has jumped Russia, which has signed a new defense pact with C.A.R.’s government and appears to be gaining access to gems and minerals in return.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the crisis in the Central African Republic.


European Pressphoto

The young nation of Eritrea is often referred to as the North Korea of Africa.

The country has jailed thousands of political prisoners, eliminated the independent press and forces much of the population into indefinite military service. Border guards sometimes ‘shoot to kill’ Eritreans fleeing the country.

But since a July peace agreement, with longtime adversary Ethiopia,  Eritreans are waiting to see if new contacts with the outside world will open up a closed state.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Eritrea's moment of opportunity.

AP Photo

For many, witch trials may seem like a relic of early colonial America.  But in fact witch-hunting is still a feature of rural life today in many parts of the world.

One place where it's prevalent is India. On average, an Indian woman is killed every other day after being accused of witchcraft, according to government statistics. Many are tortured or publicly-humiliated before being burned, stabbed or beaten to death.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the practice of witch-hunts in India, and why the phenomenon isn't merely an outgrowth of superstition. 


Tareq Salahuddin/Flickr/Creative Commons

The imbalance between the supply of organs for transplant and the demand for them can be staggering.

There are about 75,000 people active on the U.S. waiting list for kidneys, livers and other transplantable organs. On average, 20 of them die each day.

And globally, the situation is much worse.

The international shortage of transplantable organs has lead to a booming underground industry known as the "Red Market,” where people illegally buy and sell human body parts to the highest bidder.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the donor shortage has fueled a lucrative underground market, and how efforts to stifle it are shaping international policy.

(U.S. Air Force)

In early August, Vice President Mike Pence renewed a call by the Trump Administration for the U.S. military to create a “Space Force.”

The White House’s effort comes in response to advances by China, Russia and other countries in space. It also raises the question as to whether or not the move might accelerate the militarization of space.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how militaries have and could operate outside our atmosphere - and what that may mean for the future of warfare.


(White House)

Saudi Arabia's 32-year-old crown prince has already shaken up both Saudi Arabia’s internal politics as well as its foreign relations.

Mohammad bin Salman has detained prominent members of the royal family and businessmen after accusing them of corruption. He’s lifted restrictions that barred women from driving or operating businesses. He’s outlined a bold plan to wean Saudi Arabia’s economy from oil dependence.

But bin Salman has also escalated Saudi Arabia’s war in neighboring Yemen, triggering one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises. He’s feuded with nearby Qatar and Lebanon and intensified Saudi Arabia’s rivalry with its historical foe, Iran. Even Canada hasn't escaped his wrath.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at a prince upending the politics of both Saudi Arabia and the Middle East. 


The situation in Nicaragua has taken a dark turn in recent months. President Daniel Ortega's growing authoritarian streak has led to months of protests against his rule - and a violent response from pro-government militias.

With hundreds dead and many more arrested, some observers fear the country is slipping towards a new civil war. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the political crisis in Nicaragua and what lies ahead for a country still recovering from a debilitating civil war in the 1980s.


AP Photo

  In 1979 China's Communist Party implemented the “One-Child Policy” to slow the country’s population growth.

The policy was lifted in 2015, yet the effects of 36 years of strict population control will be felt for years to come. Today there are about 7.6 workers for every person over 65 in China. By 2050, fully 40 percent of the population could be over that age and the country is projected to have 100 million people 80 and over.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the emerging consequences of China's mass population control experiment.

Note: This program originally aired March 1, 2018

AP Photo

On this edition, part two of our look at press freedom and how journalists do their jobs in countries where just reporting the news can be a big challenge.

For this, we'll talk to a reporter working in Mexico - where cartel violence has made the U.S. neighbor the deadliest country in the world for journalists. We'll also talk to a reporter working in Macedonia, a country that once had an open climate for free expression but that has backslid dramatically over the past decade.

Both guests are visiting the U.S. on fellowships through the Alfred Friendly Press Partners.


AP Photo

In late June, the first Saudi women to legally drive a car in the kingdom started their engines and took off down the road.

The lifting of Saudi Arabia’s ban on female drivers was a step forward for women. But it’s just one of a number of recent steps forward for women’s rights in the Arab world.

Still, many women’s rights advocates are only cautiously optimistic. In some countries, laws aimed at helping women aren’t enforced. Nor are public attitudes toward women’s rights necessarily becoming more progressive.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at women’s rights in the Arab world.


AP Photo

The East African nation of Ethiopia has spent much of the last three decades as an authoritarian one-party state.

Political opponents of the ruling Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front were regularly jailed. Independent journalists could be beaten, exiled or charged with terrorism.

But earlier this year a new prime minister took power in Africa’s second-most populous nation and has set out to make some big changes. Abiy Ahmed is just 41, and is often compared by Ethiopians to Barack Obama for his youthful looks and energetic speeches.

He's released hundreds of political prisoners - including many charged under a sweeping “anti-terrorism” law. He’s made overtures to Ethiopia’s archenemy Eritrea and condemned his own security forces' use of torture and arbitrary detention.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Ethiopia’s new prime minister and his efforts to open one of Africa’s most repressive states.


Yann Forget/Wikimedia Commons

In the next decade, India may pass China to become the world’s most populous country.

But there’s something odd about India’s population. 

At its last census in 2011, India had 36 million more men than women. As the population grows, the World Bank predicts there will be 51 million more men by 2031.

This is due in part to the widespread practice of sex-selective abortion and the gender-based neglect of young girls leading to higher mortality rates. In some cases, 'infanticide' of newborn girls is still practiced. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss what some activists call a 'gendercide' against women.


AP Photo

Back in 2014 there was an enormous international outcry after Islamic militants from the group Boko Haram kidnapped 276 female high school students the town of Chibok in northeastern Nigeria.

Four years later, more than 100 of the Chibok girls may still be in Boko Haram’s custody. In the meantime, the group has continued to launch suicide bombings on civilians, kidnap schoolchildren and ambush Nigerian soldiers – despite repeated assurances from the Nigerian government that the militants had been defeated.

On this edition of Global Journalist a look at how Boko Haram’s two factions - one now calling itself the Islamic State in West Africa - have managed to persist in northern Nigeria. We’ll also hear about some big challenges for the education system in this part of Nigeria - where both the insurgency and a number of other factors are keeping tens of thousands of girls from going to school.


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