Morning Edition

Weekday mornings 4am-9am
  • Local Host Darren Hellwege

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.
KBIA's Under the Microscope at 8:21

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

The international tribunals at The Hague have dealt with horrific war crimes and brought Balkan war criminals and African warlords to trial.

Now, the tribunal is being asked to investigate top Vatican officials over the global clerical sex abuse scandal, and victims say these offenses meet the legal definition of crimes against humanity.

Pope Benedict XVI has repeatedly apologized for crimes committed by priests.

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DAVID GREENE, Host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Anybody following the Republican presidential debate last night could see the effect of polls.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

A bit of bond buying from China will hardly solve Europe's financial troubles. Greece remains a major concern. Yesterday, shares in French banks plunged amid investor panic about their holdings of Greek debt. NPR's Eric Westervelt has more.

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth.

It's not often that a writer can illustrate his own books, but Brian Selznick is that rare find. He began his career as an artist collaborating with authors on children's books. But he gradually realized that he wanted to tell his own stories in both words and pictures — and to do that, Selznick invented a unique narrative device.

Anamanaguchi: The Band That Plays Nintendo

Sep 12, 2011

Anamanaguchi is a punk band that's part of an underground music scene known as "chiptune," an emerging form of electronic music that creates a layered sound from limited technology: video-game systems from the '80s. The group's music got its name because it combines the sound chips of old Nintendos and Game Boys with the guitars and drums of rock; it uses software designed for writing songs, then installs those songs on chips into old game machines. On stage, its members play traditional instruments like guitars and drums along with the video-game console, chirping a digital melody.

Ohio Woman 'Trashes' Mayor's Office

Sep 12, 2011

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DAVID GREENE, host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, host:

And I'm David Greene.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

NPR's business news starts with French banks stirring up more anxiety.

(Soundbite of music)

Wake Up And Smell The Pancakes

Sep 12, 2011

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DAVID GREENE, host:

Our last word in business today is cutting-edge cuisine.

Do you ever wish you could make a burger with built-in liquid layers of ketchup and mustard, Steve?

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

No. No. But go ahead, it sounds intriguing.

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DAVID GREENE, host:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. Renee Montagne is on assignment in Afghanistan. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Let's talk about how long the political unity we saw yesterday will last with NPR's Cokie Roberts, who joins us most Mondays. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS: Hi, David.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Behind The War On Terror's Dark Curtain

Sep 11, 2011

On Sept. 12, 2001, Ali H. Soufan, a special agent with the FBI, was handed a secret file. Soufan had spent nearly a decade investigating terrorism cases, like the bombing of the U.S.S. Cole. He says that this file was one he had requested before the attacks, and that had it been given to him earlier it may have helped to prevent them.

Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner on Friday defended President Obama's new jobs plan. In a Morning Edition interview, Geithner said that if passed, the plan unveiled Thursday night "would have a substantial, powerful effect on strengthening the economy." He said that tax cuts aimed at small businesses who hire new workers would boost employment quickly.

The $447 billion package of tax cuts, infrastructure spending and aid to states "is designed to make the economy stronger now and get more Americans back to work," Geithner told host Steve Inskeep.

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, inflicted the single greatest loss of life ever suffered by a police department in U.S. history. The department wasn't the New York Police — it was the less well-known Port Authority Police Department. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey polices the bridges and tunnels around New York, and it also was in charge of security at the Twin Towers. It's a small, tight-knit department, and it lost 37 officers that day.

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with an update on a hot dog war.

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