pakistan

AP Photo

India and Jordan have relatively strong reputations for press freedom–at least in comparison to their neighbors. 

In the first of a two-part series on press freedom around the world, a look at the challenges for reporters in these two key U.S. allies. In Jordan, those who "undermine the dignity" of King Abdullah II may be criminally prosecuted. Meanwhile in India, press freedom has worsened under Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, a look at press freedom in India and Jordan with journalists visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the Alfred Friendly Press Partners.

Yann Forget/Wikimedia Commons

In the next decade, India may pass China to become the world’s most populous country.

But there’s something odd about India’s population. 

At its last census in 2011, India had 36 million more men than women. As the population grows, the World Bank predicts there will be 51 million more men by 2031.

This is due in part to the widespread practice of sex-selective abortion and the gender-based neglect of young girls leading to higher mortality rates. In some cases, 'infanticide' of newborn girls is still practiced. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss what some activists call a 'gendercide' against women.


via Wikimedia Commons (Ranjith66)

Climate change is already having big effects on southern Asia.

Deadly heat waves like one that killed 3,500 people in India and Pakistan in 2015 are becoming more frequent. The summer monsoon rains are changing, affecting farmers.  Rising sea levels are expected to flood low-lying settlements and higher ocean temperatures harm sea life.

The climate is already spurring other changes. Thailand and the Philippines have closed beaches as warming waters threaten coral. In other parts of the region, people are moving out of places where drought and natural disasters have made farming increasingly risky. Some argue that the changing climate is even fueling militancy. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how climate change is shaping life in one of the world's most vulnerable regions.


AP Photo

For many, witch trials may seem like a relic of early colonial America.  But in fact witch-hunting is still a feature of rural life today in many some of the world.

One place where it's prevalent is India. On average, an Indian woman is killed every other day after being accused of witchcraft, according to government statistics. Many are tortured or publicly-humiliated before being burned, stabbed or beaten to death.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the practice of witch-hunts in India, and why the phenomenon isn't merely an outgrowth of superstition. 

Yann Forget/Wikimedia Commons

In the next decade, India may pass China to become the world’s most populous country.

But there’s something odd about India’s population. 

At its last census in 2011, India had 36 million more men than women. As the population grows, the World Bank predicts there will be 51 million more men by 2031.

This is due in part to the widespread practice of sex-selective abortion and the gender-based neglect of young girls leading to higher mortality rates. In some cases, 'infanticide' of newborn girls is still practiced. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss what some activists call a 'gendercide' against women.


AP Photo

On this week's program, a look at two of the most difficult places for independent journalism: Cuba and Pakistan.

In Pakistan, journalists routinely face threats not only from the Taliban and other extremist groups but also from the government and intelligence agencies.

Meanwhile in Cuba, independent digital media is in its infancy after decades of Communist rule – and journalists face continuing uncertainty over when they may face arrest.


AP Photo

About 5,000 women are killed each year in so-called "honor" killings around the world.

These are crimes in which the victims, who are almost always female, are killed by family members - usually men - for bringing what they see as dishonor on the family.

Pakistan and India have the highest rates of "honor" killings in the world. But a new law in Pakistan has made such killings illegal - and raised hopes that the government will address gender violence more effectively.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the history of these killings and some recent high-profile cases that have renewed efforts to end the practice.  


Travis McMillen / RJI

At first glance, media in Pakistan and the Ukraine have little in common.

But in both the South Asian nation and the former Soviet republic, independent private news outlets are relatively new and face a host of challenges both from government restrictions and outside actors. They're also among the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, we interview journalists from prominent media outlets in each country who are visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the University of Missouri-based Alfred Friendly Press Partners.


Bikas Das / AP

Journalists and bloggers in Bangladesh are finding themselves increasingly under fire. Last year, a group that calls itself “Defenders of Islam” published a “hit list” of more than 80 writers.

Then in the first six months of 2015, three of those named were hacked to death in separate knife attacks. The latest was in May, when four masked men attacked blogger Ananta Bijoy Das with machetes while he was heading to work.

Shahzaib Akber / EPA

Every year, a handful of journalists from around the world are selected to be Alfred Friendly Fellows. These journalists are partnered with American news outlets in the hopes that they can learn and help spread U.S. news ideals, namely fair and accurate reporting.

In his home in Lahore, Pakistan, Saleem Khan holds up his late father's violin. There are no strings, the wood is scratched and the bridge is missing.

"There was a time when people used to come to Lahore from all over the world to hear its musicians," the 65-year-old violinist says in the new documentary, Song of Lahore. "Now we can't even find someone to repair our violins."

Deported for a Tweet

Mar 27, 2015
AP/Today's Zaman

This week on Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg takes you around the world for a series of stories on the challenges of journalism in a rapidly changing world.

*Mahir Zeynalov, an Azerbaijani columnist for Turkey's Today's Zaman newspaper, speaks with Global Journalist's Jason McLure about being deported from Turkey for his Twitter use.

(This post was last updated at 2:07 p.m. ET.)

Taliban militants stormed a school in northwest Pakistan on Tuesday, leaving scores of students dead.

Quoting Pakistani officials, multiple media outlets say the death toll is at least 140, including at least 80 students in grades 1 through 10.

A little before 8 p.m. local time, police announced that the operation had ended after the gunmen were killed. Security personnel, police official Abdullah Khan told the AFP, were now in the process of sweeping the rest of the building.

A roundtable with Pakistani journalists

Apr 17, 2014
pakistani-journalists-church
Kari Paul / Global Journalist

This week, we're looking at journalism in Pakistan. The country remains a treacherous place for journalists to do their jobs. In the past three weeks, two different explosive devices have been found at the home of a television journalist in Peshawar, a city in northern Pakistan. Reporters Without Borders has described the country as "long the world’s deadliest country for media personnel."

Every year the Alfred Friendly Foundation places international journalists in newsrooms across the U.S. The organization aims to impart American journalistic traditions and promote efforts worldwide to promote fair and accurate news. 

Pervez Masih / AP Images

In the past decade, Pakistan’s media has become larger, more powerful and more independent. The number of private television channels has grown from just three state-run channels in 2000 to 89 in 2012. But the challenges to practicing journalism are also growing.

Omar Mullick / Oscilloscope Laboratories.

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

How US drone strikes impact Pakistan

Jan 31, 2013
Massoud Hossaini / AP Images

The United States government has escalated the uses of drone strikes in Pakistan and in Yemen since the start of the year. And now the U.S. appears to be considering the use of drone strikes in Mali, a North African country where French forces are helping the government fight Islamist militants and rebels.

The Taliban’s attack on a 14 year old human rights campaigner in Pakistan has drawn condemnation from within the country and throughout the world.

Pakistan is the most dangerous country in the world to be a journalist.