Politics

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CBS fires the head of 60 Minutes for threatening a reporter in a text message, not because he's been accused of #sexualharassment. Plus, a prominent researcher says news organizations need to do more to avoid being manipulated by extremists, The New York Times apologies to U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, and The Weather Channel's Mike Seidel is mocked for his Hurricane Florence performance. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

Why didn’t NBC run Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein story last summer when it could? Why did the network encourage him to find another outlet for the piece? It seems Farrow, his producer and the network’s chairman have different takes as to why. Who’s telling the truth? Also, two Reuters journalists are sentenced to a lengthy prison term for reporting in Myanmar, why the 30th anniversary “Just Do It” campaign is leading to Nike boycotts, and what the FCC chairman is saying about regulating social networks. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Damon Kiesow and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Why didn’t NBC run Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein story last summer when it could? Why did the network encourage him to find another outlet for the piece? It seems Farrow, his producer and the network’s chairman have different takes as to why.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program. Also, are the Google News search results rigged against President Trump? Why he seems to think so. And, the Kansas City Star’s new subscription model. Get ready sports fans, this one’s for you!  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program.

Mary Papenfuss, Huffington Post: “NBC cuts to awkward ‘Talent’ scene after solemn McCain report

Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally? Also, President Trump’s reaction and the coverage of breaking news that came in threes, how a congressional candidate justified keeping reporters out of a meeting she opened to the public and ESPN’s effort to repair its relationship with the NFL. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally?

Commentary: Missouri's Confused Political Culture

Aug 21, 2018

I am about to conclude that the reason we are called the Show Me State is because we Missourians are confused about our identity and need someone to show us who we are.  I’ve lived in Missouri most of my life and am as curious as anyone.

Advocates for the disabled say funding cuts to in-home care could force some Missouri residents into nursing homes.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports about $8 million of the $50 million the state Legislature initially cut last year has been restored. Republican State Rep. Scott Fitzpatrick is chair of the House Budget Committee. He says the cuts affected more than 7,800 disabled Missouri residents. 

An ethics panel says there's reason to believe that former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens broke the law over how his campaign reported a donor list it obtained from a charity he founded. But the Missouri Ethics Commission director in a Friday letter wrote that the local prosecutor won't press charges.

Cole County Prosecutor Mark Richardson said he didn't find evidence of "willful misrepresentation" over when The Mission Continues donor list was reported.

Who is unhinged? It’s the title of Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s new book and it’s got just about everyone – including the president – talking. We’ll talk about how the hype built up through the week and why it’s not really selling. Also, covering the white nationalist movement without fanning the flames, how Twitter will define “dehumanizing speech,” and a unified effort nationwide to publish editorials fighting the Trump administration’s claims of “fake news.” From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Courtesy Simon & Shuster

Who is unhinged? It’s the title of Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s new book and it’s got just about everyone – including the president – talking. We’ll talk about how the hype built up through the week and why it’s not really selling.

Courtesy of Renee Hoagenson campaign and Hallie Thompson campaign

On August 7th, voters in Missouri’s 4th Congressional District will be choosing between two Democrats to face off against Republican incumbent U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler for her seat in Congress. 

KBIA sat down with both Democrats to learn more about what differentiates the two and what they see as the biggest issues facing their Missouri constituents. 

Commentary: Youth and Politics

Jul 31, 2018

My wife Jane and I have four adult children and eight grandchildren, all brilliant and talented, of course.  Both of us have fulfilling professional careers that we value, but our family is our priority, and it is a deeply child-centered clan.

Recently we saw the documentary Won't You Be My Neighbor?, about Fred Rogers’ wonderful PBS program for children.  We were both inspired by and nostalgic for the days when his vision of childhood was mainstream and also sobered by the knowledge of what too many children these days must endure.

Layoffs at Tronc’s New York Daily News nearly decimated the newspaper’s staff, leaving some to claim the nation’s biggest city a local news desert. How can it be that local news is dying in a city of more than 10 million people? Also, when candidates and special interests turn journalists’ work into endorsements and mixed messages about misinformation on Facebook.

via Flickr user Annie Mole

Layoffs at Tronc’s New York Daily News nearly decimated the newspaper’s staff, leaving some to claim the nation’s biggest city a local news desert. How can it be that local news is dying in a city of more than 10 million people?

Donald Trump will visit Missouri next week to deliver his first address as president to the annual Veterans of Foreign Wars convention.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Trump will head to Kansas City on Tuesday to address the gathering.

Missouri Senate Communications

The Missouri Democratic Party is appealing the dismissal of its lawsuit challenging a governor's ability to appoint a lieutenant governor.

The appeal was filed Tuesday. The party has argued that ambiguity in Missouri's constitution and law mean lieutenant governors can only be elected, not appointed.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

President Trump is home from Helsinki and hearing the reaction to his joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, and backing off some of Monday’s statements.

David Beard, Poynter: “Trump visit ‘exhausting’ British press corps

Brian Stelter, CNN: “Trump ratchets up ‘fake news’ rally cry overseas during UK visit

A well-known security blogger revealed the name of one her sources to the FBI – unsolicited. It’s something most wouldn’t do without court order, and still, there are reporters who will go to jail to protect their sources. So, why did Marcy Wheeler do it? Also, why KMIZ-TV apologized for decisions made during its coverage of the so-called “fireworks war” in Columbia last week, why an edited public service announcement is being blamed for the deaths of dozens in India, and bringing journalism to life… through live theater. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Commentary: Trump and the Communications Revolution

Jul 11, 2018

Two of the marvels of the modern age have directly impacted the developing world.  One is the Green Revolution, using artificial fertilizer to dramatically increase crop yields and keep billions of people from starving.  The earth is severely overpopulated, but mass starvation is not currently a problem.

The second marvel is how cellphone technology emerged at a moment that kept the developing world from having to spend billions and billions of dollars to build telephone landlines and other infrastructure.  In Africa, Asia and South America cell towers and phones are making landlines redundant, if not obsolete.

This communication revolution made me wonder if another communication revolution that is the spawn of cell technology is an explanation for the Trump Phenomenon.  Before Barack Obama, presidents communicated with their publics through traditional media: televised speeches, news conferences, press releases – all of it mediated by professional journalists.  Obama was the first president to use social media, and he used it most effectively in his two election campaigns. 


via Flickr user Michael Coghlan

A well-known security blogger revealed the name of one her sources to the FBI – unsolicited. It’s something most wouldn’t do without court order, and still, there are reporters who will go to jail to protect their sources. So, why did Marcy Wheeler do it?

Marcy Wheeler: “Putting a face (mine) to the risks posed by GOP games on Mueller investigation

Missouri Senate

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri's new lieutenant governor says the state's constitution supports his appointment.

Mike Kehoe said Wednesday that he wouldn't have accepted the job if he didn't believe the office could be filled by a governor's appointment, but he said the courts will have the final say.

Commentary: Greitens and Trump

Jun 19, 2018

In early 2016 I watched the presidential and Missouri gubernatorial campaigns with great curiosity.  After the April GOP debate in Columbia not only did I believe that Eric Greitens would not be the nominee, I was fairly sure the most traditional candidate, Lt. Governor Peter Kinder, would be.  During the spring GOP presidential candidate debates I did not know who the nominee would be, but I was fairly sure it would not be Donald Trump.  Silly me.  Silly lots of us.

Roy Blunt speaks at a podium.
Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

The Trump administration policy to force separation of migrant children and parents at the U.S.-Mexico border is facing pushback from Missouri's U.S. senators.

President Donald J. Trump's summit with Kim Jong Un was historic, but did it help more than it hurt? Plus, could too much coverage of Anthony Bourdain's suicide lead to copycats? We'll also discuss IHOP's attention-getting name change and the judicial decision that gives the green light to a big media merger. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel.

Mike Parson, R-Bolivar / Missouri State Senate Website

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Gov. Mike Parson called a rare meeting Monday with Missouri's congressional delegation, earning bipartisan praise from lawmakers.

The group met to discuss a variety of issues facing the state, including infrastructure and the opioid crisis. Stepping out of Parson's office a little before noon, several lawmakers said their relationship with the current governor was already better than the one they had with Eric Greitens, who resigned less than two weeks ago. Both Parson and Greitens are Republicans.

Updated at 10:45 a.m. June 7 with comments from Greitens' attorney — Former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens admitted as part of a deal with St. Louis prosecutors that they had enough evidence to take him to trial over the use of a charity’s donor list for his campaign.

Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office on Wednesday released the full agreement that led to Greitens stepping down last week. Two paragraphs of that deal had originally been redacted. St. Louis Public Radio and other news outlets had filed requests under Missouri’s open records law to see the complete document. Attorney General Josh Hawley’s office ruled on Tuesday that it was an open record.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson is nearly a week into his new job and is still hosting private meetings with city and state officials – while taking a few minutes to brief the media on those gatherings at least once a day.

Wednesday’s meetings included one with St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson and St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger. Before the meeting, Krewson told reporters she didn’t have any immediate requests for the new governor.

Mike Parson, R-Bolivar / Missouri State Senate Website

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson says he's keeping his predecessor Eric Greitens' ban on lobbyist gifts to executive staffers.

That means Parson also is now banned from accepting meals and other gifts. Parson previously served as lieutenant governor but was elevated to the state's top executive office when Greitens resigned amid personal and political scandal Friday.

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