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CNN has filed a federal lawsuit against President Donald J Trumpand several aides, fighting to have White House Correspondent Jim Acosta’s press credential reinstated. How have other reporters fared in the past, suing the president for access? Also, destructive protests outside Tucker Carlson’s home, an experiment that replaces television anchors using artificial intelligence, and remembering Marvel Comics founder Stan Lee. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

CNN has filed a federal lawsuit against President Donald Trump and several aides, fighting to have White House Correspondent Jim Acosta’s press credential reinstated. How have other reporters fared in the past, suing the president for access?

The Views of the News team returns tomorrow at 6 p.m. Join Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry for a complete look at the coverage of today's election, from a local, state and national level. 

Madison Conte / KBIA

President Trump made a stop at the Columbia Regional Airport Thursday endorsing Josh Hawley for Missouri’s seat in the U.S. Senate. Just 20 minutes away protesters gathered to rally against Trump and mobilize voters for next week’s midterm election.

Among the event’s speakers was Dr. Maren Bell Jones. She rallied the crowd in support of Democratic policies and her campaign for the Missouri House of Representatives in District 44. In defiance of a term adopted by some conservatives to criticize liberals, she asked the crowd, “What are snowflakes for? An avalanche.”

Details are slowly starting to emerge about what might have happened to journalist Jamal Khashoggi جمال خاشقجي inside the Saudi embassy in Istanbul. How aggressively is the #Trumpadministration really pressing for answers? And, how are news organizations changing their approach to working in Saudi Arabia. Also, President Donald J. Trump’s media tour, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s DNA test, and why polling guru Nate Silver says journalists aren’t likely to like what he sees. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Details are slowly starting to emerge about what might have happened to journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi embassy in Istanbul. How aggressively is the Trump administration really pressing for answers? And, how are news organizations changing their approach to working in Saudi Arabia.

Hatice Cengiz, New York Times: “My fiancé Jamal Khashoggi was a lonely patriot

If we don’t make some changes soon, we’re heading for ‘climate catastrophe.” That’s the message from a report from the United Nations this week. The headlines are hyperbolic, the reporting is there, but will it make people care? Also, a look back at the coverage of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation, a local collaboration reports on #bullying in schools and what happened to Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi جمال خاشقجي. Did he die in the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

via Flickr user Michael Mueller

If we don’t make some changes soon, we’re heading for ‘climate catastrophe.” That’s the message from a report from the United Nations this week. The headlines are hyperbolic, the reporting is there, but will it make people care?

It’s been almost a week since Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. We’ll talk about what’s transpired since then, and how the national news media covered it. Also, California passes its own net neutrality law, much to the ire of the federal government, Led Zeppelin is back in court over ‘Stairway to Heaven’ and the sci-fit hit Black Mirror goes interactive, From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

White House photo

It’s been almost a week since Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. We’ll talk about what’s transpired since then, and how the national news media covered it.

Thursday is shaping up to be the biggest news day of the year. In Washington, Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein meets face-to-face with President Donald Trump following a New York Times exclusive. How will journalists balance their coverage? Also, the sentencing of Bill Cosby, ‘Murphy Brown’ returns to the CBS primetime lineup and personalized playlists based on your DNA. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford
Fox News

Thursday is shaping up to potentially be the biggest news day of the year. In Washington, Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein meets face-to-face with President Donald Trump following a New York Times exclusive.

CBS fires the head of 60 Minutes for threatening a reporter in a text message, not because he's been accused of #sexualharassment. Plus, a prominent researcher says news organizations need to do more to avoid being manipulated by extremists, The New York Times apologies to U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, and The Weather Channel's Mike Seidel is mocked for his Hurricane Florence performance. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

Why didn’t NBC run Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein story last summer when it could? Why did the network encourage him to find another outlet for the piece? It seems Farrow, his producer and the network’s chairman have different takes as to why. Who’s telling the truth? Also, two Reuters journalists are sentenced to a lengthy prison term for reporting in Myanmar, why the 30th anniversary “Just Do It” campaign is leading to Nike boycotts, and what the FCC chairman is saying about regulating social networks. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Damon Kiesow and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Why didn’t NBC run Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein story last summer when it could? Why did the network encourage him to find another outlet for the piece? It seems Farrow, his producer and the network’s chairman have different takes as to why.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program. Also, are the Google News search results rigged against President Trump? Why he seems to think so. And, the Kansas City Star’s new subscription model. Get ready sports fans, this one’s for you!  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program.

Mary Papenfuss, Huffington Post: “NBC cuts to awkward ‘Talent’ scene after solemn McCain report

Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally? Also, President Trump’s reaction and the coverage of breaking news that came in threes, how a congressional candidate justified keeping reporters out of a meeting she opened to the public and ESPN’s effort to repair its relationship with the NFL. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally?

Commentary: Missouri's Confused Political Culture

Aug 21, 2018

I am about to conclude that the reason we are called the Show Me State is because we Missourians are confused about our identity and need someone to show us who we are.  I’ve lived in Missouri most of my life and am as curious as anyone.

Advocates for the disabled say funding cuts to in-home care could force some Missouri residents into nursing homes.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports about $8 million of the $50 million the state Legislature initially cut last year has been restored. Republican State Rep. Scott Fitzpatrick is chair of the House Budget Committee. He says the cuts affected more than 7,800 disabled Missouri residents. 

An ethics panel says there's reason to believe that former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens broke the law over how his campaign reported a donor list it obtained from a charity he founded. But the Missouri Ethics Commission director in a Friday letter wrote that the local prosecutor won't press charges.

Cole County Prosecutor Mark Richardson said he didn't find evidence of "willful misrepresentation" over when The Mission Continues donor list was reported.

Who is unhinged? It’s the title of Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s new book and it’s got just about everyone – including the president – talking. We’ll talk about how the hype built up through the week and why it’s not really selling. Also, covering the white nationalist movement without fanning the flames, how Twitter will define “dehumanizing speech,” and a unified effort nationwide to publish editorials fighting the Trump administration’s claims of “fake news.” From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Courtesy Simon & Shuster

Who is unhinged? It’s the title of Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s new book and it’s got just about everyone – including the president – talking. We’ll talk about how the hype built up through the week and why it’s not really selling.

Courtesy of Renee Hoagenson campaign and Hallie Thompson campaign

On August 7th, voters in Missouri’s 4th Congressional District will be choosing between two Democrats to face off against Republican incumbent U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler for her seat in Congress. 

KBIA sat down with both Democrats to learn more about what differentiates the two and what they see as the biggest issues facing their Missouri constituents. 

Commentary: Youth and Politics

Jul 31, 2018

My wife Jane and I have four adult children and eight grandchildren, all brilliant and talented, of course.  Both of us have fulfilling professional careers that we value, but our family is our priority, and it is a deeply child-centered clan.

Recently we saw the documentary Won't You Be My Neighbor?, about Fred Rogers’ wonderful PBS program for children.  We were both inspired by and nostalgic for the days when his vision of childhood was mainstream and also sobered by the knowledge of what too many children these days must endure.

Layoffs at Tronc’s New York Daily News nearly decimated the newspaper’s staff, leaving some to claim the nation’s biggest city a local news desert. How can it be that local news is dying in a city of more than 10 million people? Also, when candidates and special interests turn journalists’ work into endorsements and mixed messages about misinformation on Facebook.

via Flickr user Annie Mole

Layoffs at Tronc’s New York Daily News nearly decimated the newspaper’s staff, leaving some to claim the nation’s biggest city a local news desert. How can it be that local news is dying in a city of more than 10 million people?

Donald Trump will visit Missouri next week to deliver his first address as president to the annual Veterans of Foreign Wars convention.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Trump will head to Kansas City on Tuesday to address the gathering.

Missouri Senate Communications

The Missouri Democratic Party is appealing the dismissal of its lawsuit challenging a governor's ability to appoint a lieutenant governor.

The appeal was filed Tuesday. The party has argued that ambiguity in Missouri's constitution and law mean lieutenant governors can only be elected, not appointed.

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