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Gov. Eric Greitens' two nominees to the Missouri Ethics Commission said they did not promise anything to anybody in exchange for their nominations.

The governor nominated former Democratic state representative Wayne Henke and Republican retired financial analyst Bill Birkes to the ethics commission Friday. Concern that their nominations came at a price stemmed from Greitens' decision last year to stack the state Board of Education with people willing to fire the education commissioner.

House Investigative Report Details Governor's Aggressive Encounter

Apr 11, 2018

The woman who had an affair with Gov. Eric Greitens told House lawmakers that not all of their encounters were consensual and that the governor was sometimes violent.

The details were included in a graphic report released by a House investigative committee Wednesday. The committee did not recommend any specific action against Greitens, stating that doing so would be outside the scope of their duties. Among the options House lawmakers would have include calling for impeachment.

via Flickr Brian Solis

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress to answer questions about users’ privacy on the social media platform. At least one senator inquired as to why users don’t seem clear on how their data is collected and used. Could it lead to regulation?

Voters in the city of Ashland approved a half-cent sales tax increase Tuesday night that will fund stormwater and local park projects. Previously, the city had no source of revenue for such projects. But the growth of the city, seeing over a thousand new residents since 2000, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, strained the city budget.

Beatriz Costa Lima

Cheering at Teresa Maledy’s watch party may have only started after the final votes were counted, but the candidate had pulled ahead well before then.

“The campaign even though it’s been outside of my comfort-zone I’ve been overwhelmed with the type of support and really people who were enthusiastic about me running. So that feels great, and I want to make sure I work hard for them.”

Jamie Hobbs / KBIA

Greg Steinhoff celebrated with a few dozen supporters as he again won a seat on the Boone Hospital Board of Trustees. Steinhoff was a trustee on the hospital’s board from 1999 to 2005, and he says the hospital’s current situation is much different.

Incumbent Michael Trapp Wins Ward Two City Council Seat

Apr 4, 2018

Michael Trapp was elected to his third term as Second Ward City Councilmember on Tuesday night. His family, friends and supporters watched the results come in live at The Roof on Broadway.

When it was clear who won, the crowd cheered and Trapp began his speech.

David Ritchie and incumbent Bill Watkins both won seats Tuesday night on the board of directors for the volunteer Boone County Fire Protection District. They’ll both serve a six-year term on the five-member board.

Five seats on Jefferson City's City Council and two seats on the Board of Education for Jefferson City Public Schools were up for election on Tuesday.

Jon Hensley won the only contested race for City Council in Ward 5. He came in with 46 percent of the vote against Jim Crabtree and Ashley Jones-Kaufman. Hensley currently serves as general counsel at the Missouri State Treasurer's Office. He said he hopes to address some of the points in his campaign platform as a council member. 

Missouri Capitol
David Shane / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A bill on Gov. Eric Greitens' desk would limit how much money insurance companies would have to pay after accidents.

The proposal affects cases where multiple people are owed money from an insurance company, such as after a car accident that leaves multiple people injured. If Greitens signs the bill, the driver's insurance company could not be obligated to pay more money than whatever is listed in its policy contract. The funds could be handed over to a court, which would determine how to distribute it to victims.

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product? Also, a return to #MeToo ground zero, as the Weinstein Company files for bankruptcy, tronc’s Michael Ferro retires amid misconduct allegations, and why Stormy Daniels might be able to get out from under that non-disclosure agreement afterall. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Commentary: Jason Kander's Prospects

Mar 21, 2018

Even though it’s been a year and a half, you probably still remember the best ad from the 2016 election campaign:

via Flickr user www.quotecatalog.com

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product?

After more than 130 years of some of the most stunning photojournalism ever published, the editors of National Geographic acknowledged that for decades, much of that has been racist in its coverage of people of color. What spurred this confession and what commitment is there among today’s staff to change? Also, did O.J. Simpson admit to killing his ex-wife and her friend on a FOX special Sunday night, Tucker Carlson’s special report on the plight of men in America and reports of a deal between the Obamas and Netflix? What might Obama TV look like? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

After more than 130 years of some of the most stunning photojournalism ever published, the editors of National Geographic acknowledged that for decades, much of that has been racist in its coverage of people of color. What spurred this confession and what commitment is there among today’s staff to change?

Susan Goldberg, National Geographic: “For decades, our coverage was racist. To rise above our past, we must acknowledge it

It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts? Also, Sam Nunberg’s manic Monday media tour, covering school safety without creating a panic and sniffing out satire on social media platforms. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Monique Luisi: Views of the News.

via Flickr user 2012 Pop Culture Geek

It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts?It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts?

Sarah Kellogg

The House General Laws Committee has passed a bill allowing firearms in current “gun free zones” along with other legislation concerning guns.

Of the eight bills that had public hearings on Monday, five passed through committee Tuesday evening. The voting mostly went by party lines, with all five Republican sponsored bills and one Democrat-backed bill passing the majority republican committee.

This includes a bill that allows firearms without a conceal and carry permit into current gun free zones such as bars, hospitals and churches.

American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times. Also, why NBC insists on mispronouncing Pyeongchang, how high school journalists shifted the narrative in Parkland, Fla. and why a Seattle station spent $12,000 to forgive $1 million in viewers’ debt.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Mike Mozart

Kylie Jenner sent one tweet about a change in her Snapchat use and the company’s stock lost $1.3 billion in value. What did she say to cause investors to lose faith in the ephemeral platform? 

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Proposed legislation would allow some Missouri employees to take unpaid leave to take care of matters relating to domestic violence.

The Senate Seniors, Families and Children Committee held a public forum on the bill Wednesday morning.

The bill would legally require workplaces with a minimum of fifteen employees to allow workers to take one week of leave concerning matters of domestic violence. These days could be used to seek medical attention, obtain counseling, seek legal help or other matters related to a situation of domestic violence.  Employers with at least 50 employees would be required to allow two weeks.

Missouri Capitol Building
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri could fall in line with other states hoping to implement work requirements for “able-bodied” Missourians on Medicaid.

A Senate Committee held a public forum Wednesday morning on legislation that would require some residents to engage in 20 hours of work, education, job searching or other services per week.

American movie-goers flocked to the fictional African nation of Wakanda. “Black Panther” has gone from studio film to the makings of a movement. Is that good marketing? Or a sign of changing times. Also, why NBC insists on mispronouncing Pyeongchang, how high school journalists shifted the narrative in Parkland, Fla. and why a Seattle station spent $12,000 to forgive $1 million in viewers’ debt.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Despite all the bad press, the Republican Party is riding high, holding more state legislative seats and governorships than any time since 1922.  They control all three elected branches of the national government.  By contrast, Democrats are fractured, leaderless and outvoted at every turn.

The GOP is certainly not without problems.  The Trump base is, shall we agree, firm.  But it’s only one-third of the electorate.  Establishment Republicans lurch between taking advantage of their current dominance plus Democratic disarray and plotting Trump work-arounds, often very cynically.

Evangelicals, 81 percent of whom voted for Trump, are discredited by their tolerance of Trump’s stormy assortment of misbehaviors.  Republican women are especially conflicted.


Sinclair Broadcast Group has asked its news directors to consider donating personal funds to the company’s political action committee to help fund its lobbying efforts. Is it a conflict of interest to pay to lobby the leaders you’re covering? Also, coverage of the Winter Games from PyeongChang, Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s stay in the Celebrity Big Brother House and why a missing comma could get costly quickly. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Brett Johnson and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Sinclair Broadcast Group has asked its news directors to consider donating personal funds to the company’s political action committee to help fund its lobbying efforts. Is it a conflict of interest to pay to lobby the leaders you’re covering? 

It’s prime time for moviegoers, gearing up for the Academy Awards at the end of the month. Many of them are seeing as many films as they want for only $10 a month thanks to a new subscription service called MoviePass. How does it work and why are movie chains so against it? Also, Newsweek’s senior management fired in what might have been an act of retaliation, Tronc sells the Los Angeles Times and why the Las Vegas Review-Journal spiked a story about allegations of sexual misconduct against casino magnate Steve Wynn’s two decades ago. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

President Trump delivered his first State of the Union address last night. Was it effective? We'll discuss. Facebook says it's going to increase the number of local news stories in your feed. How exactly will that work? Plus: Twitter bots, the Pope's take on fake news and a look at the news organizations that are being credited for exposing sexual abuse by U.S. Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas. Views of the News.

Commentary: A Political Book Review

Jan 29, 2018

If you live in Columbia you may know Larry and Jan Grossman.  They are respected business people and their son Matt, who graduated from Rock Bridge, is a respected political scientist who teaches at a Big Ten university.  Matt is a prolific author of textbooks, including one I have used for years in my political parties classes at Columbia College.


Missouri House and Senate leaders are balking at Gov. Eric Greitens’ plan to establish a line of credit to ensure that all state income tax refunds are paid on time.

The $250 million credit line is part of the governor’s proposed state budget for Fiscal Year 2019, which begins July 1. But President Pro-tem Ron Richard, R-Joplin, gave a flat-out “no” to that idea while talking with the media Thursday.

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