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Think you’ve spotted fake news? Feel like you need to report it to someone? In Italy, news consumers are being asked to report fake news to a police agency who will fact check it, and if need be set the record straight. It might limit misinformation, but what effect might it have on freedom of the press? Also, coverage of the government shutdown, Rupert Murdoch’s suggestion that Facebook should pay publishers carriage fees like cable companies do the networks and the HuffPost ditches the model that’s defined it for years. 

Think you’ve spotted fake news? Feel like you need to report it to someone? In Italy, news consumers are being asked to report fake news to a police agency who will fact check it, and if need be set the record straight. It might limit misinformation, but what effect might it have on freedom of the press?

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has released portions of his plan to cut taxes in Missouri.

Greitens said in a written statement Thursday afternoon that most of the details of his proposal will be laid out “in the coming weeks.” But the Republican governor has listed several goals, or “principles,” that make up the plan.

Missouri's attorney general has accused St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger of multiple violations of the Missouri Sunshine Law.

In a lawsuit filed Wednesday, Josh Hawley, a Republican, accuses Stenger, a Democrat, of failing to respond to records requests by the deadline set in state law. Stenger’s office is also accused of failing to have one person handle all records requests.

At least one Republican lawmaker is calling for Gov. Eric Greitens to resign following reports of an extramarital affair. Greitens denies details in a KMOV-TV report that he photographed the woman without her consent and used them to blackmail her. The station’s reporting is salacious and scandalous, but it is news? Does the public’s right to know about their elected officials’ behavior outweigh an individual’s right to privacy? Also, coverage of sexual misconduct accusations against Actor Aziz Ansari take a very different tone, President Trump’s use of language and drastic changes to the Facebook algorithm. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

At least one Republican lawmaker is calling for Gov. Eric Greitens to resign following reports of an extramarital affair. Greitens denies details in a KMOV-TV report that he photographed the woman without her consent and used them to blackmail her. The station’s reporting is salacious and scandalous, but it is news? Does the public’s right to know about their elected officials’ behavior outweigh an individual’s right to privacy? 

Hair braiders in Missouri have lost an appeal over a state requirement that they must be licensed like barbers and cosmetologists.

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday affirmed a lower court ruling in St. Louis that upheld the Missouri law.

The fallout over Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ admitted affair and allegations of blackmail was swift, with the local prosecutor heeding Thursday's calls from Republicans and Democrats for an investigation, and some Democrats suggesting the governor should resign.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ admission late Wednesday that he had an extramarital affair before he was governor bumped his second State of the State address out of the headlines. 

Just after the speech Wednesday evening, Greitens and his wife, Sheena Greitens, issued a statement saying “there was a time when he was unfaithful” in their marriage. The admission came as KMOV-TV prepared to air a report about the affair, featuring the man who said he was the ex-husband of the woman in question. 

Updated January 11 at 4:20 p.m. with Gardner investigation —  Missouri House and Senate Republican leaders issued almost identical statements of concern Thursday as they otherwise declined comment on the sex scandal swirling around Gov. Eric Greitens.

Using the bad weather as an excuse, most lawmakers fled the state Capitol, and both chambers adjourned swiftly until next Tuesday.

However, a bipartisan group of senators – all frequent critics of the governor – announced they were sending a letter asking state Attorney General Josh Hawley to investigate the matter.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens used his State of the State address Wednesday to announce a proposal to cut state taxes this year, even as the state budget is still adjusting to earlier state and federal tax cuts that are just now going into effect.

What happens when the president’s attorney’s try to block the publication of a White House tell-all? Sales go through the roof, of course… and buzz on television and radio gets louder and louder, quite literally. Where Wolff’s reporting techniques sound? Did the president’s surrogates hurt argument that anecdotes weren’t accurate? Also, how rumors of Oprah Winfrey’s 2020 presidential run made news, why the BBC’s China editor resigned her post, and a new publisher at the Columbia Daily Tribune. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Paul Love to Run Against Trapp for City Council; Peters to Run Unopposed

Jan 10, 2018

Following Tuesday’s filing deadline to run for Columbia City Council in April, Sixth Ward Councilwoman Betsy Peters will run unopposed and Second Ward Councilman Mike Trapp will face one challenger, Paul Love, who unsuccessfully tried to unseat him in 2015.

What happens when the president’s attorney’s try to block the publication of a White House tell-all? Sales go through the roof, of course… and buzz on television and radio gets louder and louder, quite literally. Where Wolff’s reporting techniques sound? Did the president’s surrogates hurt argument that anecdotes weren’t accurate?

Michael Wolff, NY Magazine: “Donald Trump didn’t want to be president”

The search has begun for Missouri’s next education commissioner, even though there currently aren’t enough board members to vote on hiring Margie Vandeven’s successor.

Ten people applied for the job by Monday’s deadline. But Board of Education President Charlie Shields said they can’t even review their applications until there are at least five voting members on the State Board.

Torie Ross / KBIA

A state audit shows Missouri is paying out income tax refunds later and later because the state is short on cash.

Democratic Auditor Nicole Galloway released an audit Monday that said the state paid roughly $423,000 in interest on late refunds to nearly 155,000 taxpayers last fiscal year.

That's up from fiscal year 2016, when the state paid about $306,000 in interest for about 83,000 late refunds.

A state representative from rural Missouri won’t face any punishment for a controversial Facebook post he made last summer.

The House Ethics Committee considered sanctions against Rep. Warren Love, R-Osceola, for a Facebook post in which he said vandals who defaced a Confederate monument should be “hung from a tall tree with a long rope.”

Ryan Silvey has been confirmed as the next member of the Missouri Public Service Commission, and has resigned his seat in the State Senate.

The Republican from Kansas City was appointed by Gov. Eric Greitens, who Silvey has criticized for accepting money from politically-active non-profit groups that don’t reveal their donors. He also criticized Greitens for how he dealt with lawmakers in the GOP-controlled General Assembly.

senate.mo.gov

Gov. Eric Greitens has appointed fellow Republican Sen. Ryan Silvey to the state's utility regulation board.

Greitens announced Silvey's appointment to the Public Service Commission Tuesday, the day before the start of the 2018 legislative session.

The commission regulates and establishes rates for electric, natural gas and other public utility companies including Ameren.

An organization that advocates for open government is asking a judge to bar Gov. Eric Greitens and his staff from using an app that deletes messages after they're read.

In a lawsuit filed last month by an attorney for the Missouri Sunshine Project, attorney Ben Sansone claims the use of the Confide app by Greitens and his staff violates the state's public records laws. The app deletes messages and prevents recipients from saving, forwarding, printing or taking screenshots of messages.

Commentary: America's Clinical Trial

Dec 26, 2017

A few years ago in an airport gate area I overheard a man on his Bluetooth talking about his business.  When he was free I asked him about it.  He said he owned a startup biotech firm that had patented a drug that was in clinical trials.  I asked about the drug and he said it was an ointment for joint pain.  He said the key ingredient was cocaine.

A year ago last week Donald Trump was officially chosen president by the Electoral College.  Had 77 thousand voters in three states – Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania – voted for Hillary Clinton instead of Donald Trump, Ms. Clinton would have not only won the popular vote by three million, she would also have narrowly won the Electoral Vote. 

Missouri's unemployment rate has dropped slightly.

Department of Economic Development data released Tuesday show the state's unemployment rate went down from 3.5 percent in October to 3.4 percent in November. The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate has dropped 1.1 percent since the same time last year.

Wikimedia Commons

The St. Louis Cardinals have received federal certification giving the organization legal protections in the event of a terrorist attack at Busch Stadium.

Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill announced Tuesday that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security awarded the Cardinals certification under the Support Anti-Terrorism by Fostering Effective Technologies Act, known as the Safety Act. Certification was approved Dec. 11.

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401K / Flickr

Missouri's revenue director says a federal tax overhaul should have a relatively minor effect on the state's bottom line.

Department of Revenue Director Joel Walters said Tuesday that budget officials are still working on projections, but he thinks that the federal tax changes could result in "a relatively narrow plus or minus" of around $100 million to the state's tax revenues.

Missouri will not issue $140 million dollars in state low income housing tax credits next year.

The Missouri Housing Development Commission voted 8 to 2 Tuesday to zero out the state’s low-income housing tax credit for the year. It also voted to apply for the federal version of the incentive.

There's a new date for an ethics hearing on a Republican lawmaker who called for the vandal of a Confederate monument to be hanged. 

Missouri's Department of Corrections continues to struggle with a staffing shortage across the state's more than 20 prisons. 

Doug Jones defeated Roy Moore in yesterday’s special election for Alabama’s open senate seat. It’s a huge win for Jones… but how big of a win is it for journalists? Also Gov. Greitens’ use of a secret messaging app, former Gawker employees seek to buy back the bankrupt gossip site and MSNBC rehires a contributor fired after some sexually suggestive tweets. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has been using the ephemeral messaging app Confide to communicate with top aides, leaving many to wonder what they’re discussing and whether records that should be public are being destroyed before the public can see them. Reporters across the state are trying to learn how and why it’s being used, with little success. Why the secrecy? And what will it take to access that content under the state’s Sunshine Law? 

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