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Courtesy of Seth Thompson

At The Heart Of An Outbreak, One Town Grapples With Requiring Masks

Seth Thompson learned about COVID-19 early. He’s an engineer in Carthage, Missouri, a town of just under 15,000 that sits along historic route 66 in the southwest corner of the state. The virus first came to Thompson’s attention in February, when the global firm he works for shut down its offices in China. Back then, the danger seemed remote. “We were seeing the news; it looked terrible, and it was but it just wasn’t here yet," Thompson said. When Missouri shut down in early April, his county...

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Lots of people, especially many Native Americans, loathe the name of the Washington, D.C., NFL team, the Redskins.

"The origin of that name is rooted in murder and violence and genocide and hate," says Crystal Echo Hawk, the founder and CEO of the advocacy group IllumiNative. "It's a dictionary-defined racial slur, full-stop."

A momentous Supreme Court term is over. The last strokes of the pen were devoted to repudiating President Trump's claim that he is categorically immune from state grand jury and congressional subpoenas.

But the term also featured just about every flashpoint in American law — including abortion, religion, immigration and much more.

Here are six takeaways:

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Missouri News and Politics

Lots of people, especially many Native Americans, loathe the name of the Washington, D.C., NFL team, the Redskins.

"The origin of that name is rooted in murder and violence and genocide and hate," says Crystal Echo Hawk, the founder and CEO of the advocacy group IllumiNative. "It's a dictionary-defined racial slur, full-stop."

The Urban League of Greater Kansas City, the NAACP, Urban Summit and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference jointly held a press conference on the steps of Kansas City police headquarters in the wake of the federal government sending 100 officers to Kansas City, Missouri, to help fight the increase in violent crime and solve homicides.

Missouri this week saw a dramatic increase in the number of coronavirus cases, with nearly 800 people testing positive on Thursday.

The seven-day average of new cases in Missouri is nearly three times what it was a month ago. As of Thursday, about 600 new cases were diagnosed each day. 

However, during the same period, the seven-day average of daily deaths dropped by 32%.

Read More News From Across Missouri

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Free Mental Health Services Now Available to Boone County Essential Workers

12 hours ago

Essential workers in Boone County can now receive free mental health services through HeartSpace Clinic

Doctors, nurses, teachers, counselors, caseworkers, social workers, teachers and people working in other essential roles in the medical and healing fields who have dealt with the impact of COVID-19 are eligible.

The services are being funded by the Boone County Community Health and Medical Fund, according to a news release from the Boone County Commission. 

Health Director Extends Current Phase of Reopening Order

12 hours ago

Columbia's reopening has been put on "pause."

Columbia/Boone County Public Health and Human Services announced Friday it was extending the second phase, step three, of the reopening plan until Aug. 10.

MU Will Enforce Columbia's Mandatory Face Mask Ordinance for Fall Semester

12 hours ago

MU will follow the city of Columbia's mandatory face mask ordinance on campus this fall, a university spokesman confirmed Friday.

Courtesy of Seth Thompson

Seth Thompson learned about COVID-19 early.  He’s an engineer in Carthage, Missouri, a town of just under 15,000 that sits along historic route 66 in the southwest corner of the state. The virus first came to Thompson’s attention in February, when the global firm he works for shut down its offices in China. Back then, the danger seemed remote.

“We were seeing the news; it looked terrible, and it was but it just wasn’t here yet," Thompson said.