KBIA | News. Insightful. Local. Connected.

Top Local News

Lawrence Singer Sky Smeed Wants To Convince You That 'Positivity Will Prevail'

When Lawrence songwriter Sky Smeed starts his new album lamenting that he’s leaving yet again, he sounds sad, like we're about to hear a story of one more time when things just didn’t work out. In reality, it's just the opposite. "I'm the happiest I've ever been right now in my life, which is pretty amazing for me," Smeed says. "I got married in May of last year, and everything's just really clicking." A native of Chanute, Kansas, Smeed has toured the Midwest, including an annual circuit of...

Read More

More News

After nearly two years of waiting, special counsel Robert Mueller's report into Russia's attack on the 2016 presidential election is finally done. And there's growing bipartisan pressure on Attorney General William Barr to make it public.

Robert Mueller may have completed his report, but other investigations into President Trump are expected to carry on for months.

There are, broadly, two kinds: those being undertaken from within the executive branch and those being run by members of Congress — mostly Democrats in control of major committees in the House.

Read and Listen to More Stories from NPR and KBIA

Missouri News and Politics

Copyright 2019 KCUR 89.3. To see more, visit KCUR 89.3.

ALISA CHANG, HOST:

The number of new HIV cases in Missouri is on the rise — and a disproportionately large number are in rural counties.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified Missouri as one of seven states with a “substantial rural burden” — noting that it has more than 75 cases and 10 percent or more of diagnoses in rural areas. Public health researchers say the concentration of cases likely is due to several factors, including lack of access to health care.

Scott Air Force Base Project Could Be Cut To Pay For Border Wall Construction

12 hours ago

Among the military construction projects that could be cut, or at least delayed, in order to pay for a wall on the southern border of the United States is a $41 million communications facility expansion at Scott Air Force Base.

Plans to build a new $1.75-billion National Geospatial-Intellence Agency campus in north St. Louis, a $5 million automated record fire range for the Illinois Army National Guard in Marseilles and a new $9 million fire rescue facility in Peoria are other construction projects that could be affected in order to build a border wall.

Those projects were among the $12.9 billion worth of military construction projects that could be sacrificed in order to pay for a border wall, according to a list released by the Department of Defense.

Read More News From Across Missouri

In Memory of Joyce Mitchell

In Memory of Joyce Mitchell, Friend of Classical Music and Public Radio

Gifts in Joyce Mitchell's memory can be made to Classical 90.5 FM's “Chopin Café" which she helped establish.

More from KBIA

Emily Aiken

Midnight in Paris was featured at the 2019 True False Film Festival. Emily Aiken sat down with directors James Blagden and Roni Moore to chat about how they met, their interactions with the Flint students featured in their film, and the deeper meaning behind the story.


"By and large, I would say, as a human being and as a society, we need to make the conscious effort to get out there and spend more time exploring nature - for our health, for our body, for our mind." -- DR. ANAND CHOCKALINGAM, MD, Cardiologist, MU Health Care. March 22, 2019

University of Missouri-St. Louis Chancellor Tom George is retiring.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Thursday reported that he's stepping down Sept. 1.

George started at the university in 2003 and will have served 16 years when he retires. The newspaper reports he will be the longest-tenured chancellor in the school's 56-year history.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson declared a state of emergency Thursday following flooding that left several people stranded and continues to cause damage and strain levees in several Midwest states.

Parson's action will allow state agencies to work directly with local officials responding to flooding. Parson, along with the state's Emergency Management Agency director and other officials, plan to meet with local leaders and survey damage Thursday.

"The rising floodwaters are affecting more Missouri communities and farms, closing more roads and threatening levees, water treatment plants and other critical infrastructure," Parson said in a statement. "We will continue to work closely with our local partners to assess needs and provide resources to help as Missourians continue this flood fight and as we work to assist one another."