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Missouri S&T Students Design A Pocket-Size Filter For People With Contaminated Water

Students at the Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla are building a portable water filter that can help people who lack access to clean water. The graduate engineering students are using paper and nano-size silica particles to filter toxins produced by harmful growths of algae. They plan to demonstrate their project at the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Student Design Competition in June at a technology conference. Water-filtering technologies that exist on the market are often complicated and inaccessible to remote, rural communities that need them the most, said Sutapa Barua, a Missouri S&T chemical engineering professor who advises the students.

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Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas is rethinking some of his proposed budget cuts.

The budget Lucas announced earlier this month included major cuts to arts, tourism and entrepreneurship programs. 

But in a letter to the city council late Friday afternoon, Lucas said he will restore funding to the Kansas City Film Commission and Children’s Mercy Hospital.

At the city’s first budget hearing in February, dozens of filmmakers, artists and arts supporters testified against the reductions.

A bill introduced this week in the Missouri House of Representatives aims to prevent landlords from threatening to or actually disclosing their tenants’ immigration status.

During a press conference Friday at St. John the Baptist Parish Hall, state Rep. Sarah Unsicker said the proposal is a necessary protection for immigrant tenants who are being harassed and intimidated by their landlords for speaking out against poor housing conditions.

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Missouri News and Politics

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas is rethinking some of his proposed budget cuts.

The budget Lucas announced earlier this month included major cuts to arts, tourism and entrepreneurship programs. 

But in a letter to the city council late Friday afternoon, Lucas said he will restore funding to the Kansas City Film Commission and Children’s Mercy Hospital.

At the city’s first budget hearing in February, dozens of filmmakers, artists and arts supporters testified against the reductions.

A bill introduced this week in the Missouri House of Representatives aims to prevent landlords from threatening to or actually disclosing their tenants’ immigration status.

During a press conference Friday at St. John the Baptist Parish Hall, state Rep. Sarah Unsicker said the proposal is a necessary protection for immigrant tenants who are being harassed and intimidated by their landlords for speaking out against poor housing conditions.

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen approved financing for the Major League Soccer stadium redevelopment plan on Friday. 

The plan received overwhelming support, passing with a 22-1 vote. The bills were sponsored by 17 aldermen.

Supporters of the MLS team say the $500 million development will bring in millions to the city.

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Afternoon Newscast for February 28, 2020

3 hours ago

Good afternoon! Here's some regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: 

MU is not allowing any new university sponsored travel to China and South Korea, according to an announcement Friday from Chancellor Alexander Cartwright.

In the announcement sent out to students, staff and faculty, Cartwright said that the suspension of travel to China and South Korea will also apply to any new faculty trips, with trips that have already been approved being considered on a case-by-case basis.

Never heard of Wolff's Law? It's the result of a post-mortem bone density test conducted back in 1892. Methods for determining your bone health have come a long way since then (now it can be done while you're living!), and OsteoStrong Columbia owner DAYNA GLANZ is here to tell us all about it. Also, if you enjoy TED Talks but wish you had a group in which to discuss the topic, the spring session at Osher@Mizzou has got you covered! Classes begin soon. GUESTS: JEANNE DZURICK and GLORIA CRULL (4:37) February 28, 2020

Tony Perez stands, speaking into a microphone.
Kelly Kenoyer / KBIA

The City of Columbia hosted its first Affordable Housing Summit on Thursday with a keynote focused on missing middle housing. The term refers to house-sized buildings with multiple housing units built in walkable neighborhoods, according to the keynote speaker, Tony Perez.

Missing Middle Housing includes everything from duplexes to a small apartment building surrounding a garden, and it appeals to baby boomers and millennials alike because it’s more affordable and it’s close to amenities like shops and restaurants.