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Thousands In Missouri Already Have Medical Marijuana Cards With Nowhere To Legally Buy It

Missouri has already approved more than 17,000 patients for its yet-to-be-launched medical marijuana program — a stark contrast to neighboring Illinois, which had fewer than 3,000 patients in the first 10 months. Licenses for Missouri’s dispensaries are expected to be awarded by January, and cannabis should be available for medical card holders by spring. At their core, Missouri and Illinois programs do the same thing: They allow doctors to certify patients to use cannabis if they have a qualifying condition. But there are significant differences in the details of each law, including who has access, how they’re getting access and how the programs can be changed in the future.

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At a military base in Hasakah province in northeastern Syria, a speeding Bradley armored fighting vehicle churns up sand as it speeds past a TV camera, an American flag flying behind its turret.

The Bradley vehicle, airlifted in from Kuwait, was demonstrated for a small group of journalists, the first group of reporters taken by the U.S. military to Syria since President Trump announced late last month that he would leave troops there to protect oil installations.

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” at noon on Thursday. This story will be updated after the show. Here are some ways to listen live.

The Trump administration’s formal withdrawal of the U.S. from the Paris Agreement on climate change has members of the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative concerned. The organization is worried that the withdrawal could lead to U.S. commodities producers being taxed or penalized by countries that signed on to the accord, something that the European Union has signaled they would like to pursue.

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This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” at noon on Thursday. This story will be updated after the show. Here are some ways to listen live.

The Trump administration’s formal withdrawal of the U.S. from the Paris Agreement on climate change has members of the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative concerned. The organization is worried that the withdrawal could lead to U.S. commodities producers being taxed or penalized by countries that signed on to the accord, something that the European Union has signaled they would like to pursue.

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” over the noon hour Thursday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Metro Theater Company’s Julia Flood was looking for a classic holiday show this fall — one that would also speak to Metro’s mission as a theater company inspired by the intelligence and emotional wisdom of young people. Her colleague John Wolbers’ fresh take on the story of George Bailey and the town of Bedford Falls aspires to fit the bill.

Starting treatment with a mental health specialist often requires a wait of several weeks, but many psychiatrists and other specialists in Kansas City have waiting lists stretching over months.

While the need for mental health treatment has been growing in Missouri, many patient advocates say the state’s refusal to aggressively enforce mental health parity may be making the wait times even longer.

Marty Sexton, a 50-year-old disabled grandfather who lives in Peculiar, worked as a firefighter and then an army medic in Operations Desert Storm, Desert Shield and Enduring Freedom.

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Kinder Institute Gives $10 Million Gift to MU

5 hours ago
MU columns.
Sara Shahriari / KBIA

The University of Missouri has received a $10 million gift from the Kinder Foundation, which will be used to support two new degrees programs.

The university announced Tuesday it will offer a bachelor's degree in constitutional democracy and a master's degree in Atlantic history and politics. The gift will support expanding faculty and staff for the new degrees.

Rich and Nancy Kinder of Houston, Texas, formed the Kinder Foundation in 1997. Rich Kinder, a Cape Girardeau native, under bachelor's and law degrees at Missouri in the 1960s.

Glascock Announces New Deputy City Manager

5 hours ago
Columbia City Hall
Meiying Wu / KBIA

Columbia City Manager John Glascock announced De’Carlon Seewood as the next deputy city manager Tuesday.

Glascock said in a news release Seewood was chosen because of his background in economic development, human resources and community development and that his passion for public service will benefit the community and city.

Impeachment hearings will soon be underway in the U.S. House of Representatives. What advice does our panel have for journalists covering it? Also, CBS fires an employee for leaking video obtained while working at ABC, John Oliver comments on a series of lawsuits and an apology from Northwestern University journalism students frustrates many in the profession.