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Retaining Humanity with David France and Maxim Lapunov (WELCOME TO CHECHNYA)

We continue our dispatches from last year's festival with the final True/False Podcast episode recorded in-studio during 2020. The guests were filmmaker David France and Maxim Lapunov, who was imprisoned and tortured as part of the Chechen government's persecution of its LGBTQ community. Lapunov and the subjects of France's 2020 film, Welcome to Chechnya were the recipients of the True Life Fund, the festival's philanthropic effort which provides monetary support to those documented in the select film. Welcome to Chechnya co-producer Igor Myakotin provided translation.

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The U.S. Coast Guard on Monday suspended the search for missing crewmembers of a commercial lift boat that capsized off the coast of Louisiana last week.

The Seacor Power tipped about 8 miles south of Port Fourchon, La. into the Gulf of Mexico. Rescuers saved six crewmembers from the water hours after the ship went down last Tuesday. The bodies of four other crewmembers were discovered in the days that followed.

Eight were still missing by Monday.

A 175-year-old building on 634 South Broadway, St. Louis was the home of two notable St. Louis figures: Roswell Field and his son Eugene Field.

The former served as the attorney for Dred and Harriet Scott during their lawsuit for freedom in 1853. The latter is a literary figure most known for his newspaper columns and children’s poetry.

When the house was under threat of demolition in the mid-1930s, a committee formed to raise funds for restoration. Their efforts led to the building becoming a museum in 1936. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 2007.

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Missouri News and Politics

A 175-year-old building on 634 South Broadway, St. Louis was the home of two notable St. Louis figures: Roswell Field and his son Eugene Field.

The former served as the attorney for Dred and Harriet Scott during their lawsuit for freedom in 1853. The latter is a literary figure most known for his newspaper columns and children’s poetry.

When the house was under threat of demolition in the mid-1930s, a committee formed to raise funds for restoration. Their efforts led to the building becoming a museum in 1936. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 2007.

St. Louis-area activists are hopeful that a Minneapolis jury will find former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty in the killing of George Floyd last spring.

But community leaders say emotions are high in St. Louis and across the nation because juries often acquit white officers charged with killing Black people.

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas Celebrates The Birth Of His Son

8 hours ago

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas has a new title — father.

The 36-year-old announced the birth of his son in a Facebook post, marking a new chapter in the life of the law professor and former city council member. The proud dad shared a few precious details about his son on social media. His name is Bennett and he's already a Kansas City Chiefs fan.

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Sager | Braudis -- Painting of the Month

An Embrace, Of Sorts
SARA OLSHANSKY

Sager | Braudis -- Painting of the Month

Sara Olshansky -- An Embrace, Of Sorts
Artist Sara Olshansky was born in Louisville, Kentucky. She graduated from the Hite Art Institute at the University of Louisville in 2018 with a BFA in 2D Studio Art and a BA in Art History. In this drawing, Olshansky explores addition and erasure of imagery on a single picture plane, with interest in how this technique might mirror lived experience, especially with respect to time. By condensing past, present, and future to one, monoscenic picture plane, she makes the components interdependent, emphasizing their relativity. Instead of representing a space, as a drawing traditionally would, this composition conveys interactions and movements over time.

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Afternoon Newscasts for April 19, 2021

9 hours ago

Here's a roundup of regional headlines from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

We continue our dispatches from last year's festival with the final True/False Podcast episode recorded in-studio during 2020. The guests were filmmaker David France and Maxim Lapunov, who was imprisoned and tortured as part of the Chechen government's persecution of its LGBTQ community. Lapunov and the subjects of France's 2020 film, Welcome to Chechnya were the recipients of the True Life Fund, the festival's philanthropic effort which provides monetary support to those documented in the select film. Welcome to Chechnya co-producer Igor Myakotin provided translation. 

Rebecca Smith / KBIA

This story has been updated with audio and additional quotes. 

A group of more than 100 MU students, faculty and advocates gathered this morning at MU's Traditions Plaza to protest a planned restructuring of key campus social justice organizations.

Campus centers affected by the changes are reported to be the five organizations in the social justice department on campus - including MU's Gaines/Oldham Black Culture Center, the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention (RSVP) Center, the LGBTQ Resource Center, the Multicultural Center (MCC), and the Women's Center. 

Maples Rep Theatre is back! Artistic director TODD DAVISON tells us how he and his team at the Royal Theatre in Macon are making sure that the curtain goes up on the 2021 season. Plus, get details on 'Annie' auditions and an upcoming fundraiser for the boots and black tie-wearing member of your family! April 19, 2021

Here's a roundup of regional headlines from the KBIA Newsroom, including: