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Ameren Invests in Wind And Solar Energy, Aims For Net-Zero Carbon Emissions By 2050

Ameren Missouri will invest nearly $8 billion in renewable energy in Missouri. The utility will expand its reliance on wind and solar energy and purchase two wind energy facilities over the next few months, Ameren officials said Monday. The investment is part of Ameren’s goal to reach net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. “We considered the call of many stakeholders, including our customers, to get as clean as we can as fast as we can,” Ameren Chairman and President Marty Lyons said. Ameren aims...

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In the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the #MeToo movement took off, a new report finds that people working in Hollywood and the entertainment business say not enough has changed.

The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination, surveyed nearly 10,000 people in the entertainment industry nationwide. It found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation, or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account.

Sandra Thornhill has been thinking about — and suffering for — her hair as long as she can remember.

“Since I was a little girl…worried about my hair, getting burned by the hot comb to get it straightened out on a Sunday morning to be presentable,” Thornhill says.

As an adult, Thornhill says she would spend hours twisting her hair so that it looked like the perfect Afro. It wasn’t until graduate school that she decided to embrace dreadlocks — a decision she says allows her to be more present at work and in public.

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Sandra Thornhill has been thinking about — and suffering for — her hair as long as she can remember.

“Since I was a little girl…worried about my hair, getting burned by the hot comb to get it straightened out on a Sunday morning to be presentable,” Thornhill says.

As an adult, Thornhill says she would spend hours twisting her hair so that it looked like the perfect Afro. It wasn’t until graduate school that she decided to embrace dreadlocks — a decision she says allows her to be more present at work and in public.

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” at noon on Wednesday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

Segment 1: President Dwight D. Eisenhower "deserves to be heard today" says granddaughter.

In a new book, Susan Eisenhower looks at how her grandfather, the 34th president of the United States, made huge decisions both during World War II and in his eight years in the White House. The book comes at the same time a new monument honoring him is unveiled in Washington D.C.

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The head of a Missouri division that oversees child welfare services has resigned after only three months on the job.

David Wood, a Republican from Versailles, said Monday that he resigned as director of the Division of Children's Services, which oversees child abuse and neglect issues, child care licensing, adoption and foster care, He gave no reason for his resignation and state officials also declined to discuss it.

The number of people hospitalized for the coronavirus has nearly tripled in areas outside of Missouri's two largest metropolitan areas since the state reopened for business in mid-June.

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services' COVID-19 dashboard shows that the state's northwest, southeast, southwest and central regions all reached record highs for virus-related hospitalizations on Monday, based on seven-day averages.

Kansas City patrol officers will begin wearing body cameras early next year.

The police department says the cameras will be delivered in early December. The police department said Monday that after officers undergo training, the public should see them wearing body cameras early next year. Civil rights organizations have been calling for police to get body cameras for years, and that pressure increased after social justice demonstrations in the city this year.

An audit has found that St. Louis police spent nearly $14 million on overtime while struggling to fill 100 vacant positions.

State Auditor Nicole Galloway faulted police for lacking policies to monitor excessive overtime and said that the department understands that the situation is "not sustainable." She added that the situation will likely be helped by the repeal last week of the requirement that officers reside within city limits.