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The Center Project, mid-Missouri's only LGBTQ+ community ally center, is partnering with Burrell Behavioral Health to offer a virtual training session to healthcare professionals Friday.

The program geared towards healthcare professionals will focus on how to provide gender-affirming care for trans and non-binary patients.


Coronavirus vaccine supply is starting to outpace demand in Missouri, even after the state expanded eligibility, raising worries among some health care providers.

Early on, mass vaccination clinics in rural areas sometimes had excess doses, but demand had remained strong in more populous areas until recently.

The slowdown is occurring even though the state deemed anyone old enough to get the shot eligible last week and most residents remain unvaccinated.

State data shows that just 32.8 percent of residents have received at least one dose as of Wednesday.

The Missouri House wants to redirect Medicaid expansion funding to services for people with disabilities, the elderly and other vulnerable groups.

The GOP-led House on Thursday voted 143-1 to pass an alternative plan for how to spend the Medicaid expansion money.

Missouri voters last year amended the state Constitution to extend access to the government health care program to thousands more low-income adults.

We are coming out of one of the most tumultuous elections in recent memory, so it's understandable that you might want to take a rest from keeping up with politics. But the reality of politics doesn't stop — whether in Washington D.C. or Jefferson City — and the decisions made in both places affect our lives throughout the year. 

So today, we're talking about the 2021 Missouri Legislative Session and some of the most important issues you need to know about. We're also talking civic engagement, and the ways that you can get involved. What issues do you care about? How do you stay engaged outside of voting?

Volunteers Show Up in the Rain for Fulton Clean Sweep

11 hours ago

Volunteers in Fulton cleaned up the city in the 20th annual Clean Sweep on Saturday.

Volunteers met at Memorial Park at 9 a.m. to receive trash bags and t-shirts for the event. They then walked along 4th Street and Stinson Creek throughout the morning.

People from all ages came out to support the event, the youngest starting at age seven, who cleaned up along the Stinson Creek.


What is the difference between a dietitian and a nutritionist? JEAN HOWARD, RD, LD, Missouri Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells us what we need to know. Plus, hear what she has to say about a recent report from NPR that says most Americans stick to just 20 different foods in their diet. April 15, 2021

The Missouri tourist town of Branson is ditching its mask mandate early after electing a new mayor who ran on platform that called for doing away with it.

Newly elected Mayor Larry Milton said that the “city heard your voices loud and clear" after the Board of Alderman voted 6-0 on Tuesday night to repeal the public masking ordinance effective Friday. The ordinance was first enacted July 31 after extensive discussion amid rising COVID-19 case counts.

Ashland Settles Lawsuit With Former Police Chief Woolford

17 hours ago

The city of Ashland’s insurer paid a six-figure sum to former Police Chief Lyn Woolford to settle a civil claim against the city after Woolford was removed from the job by former Mayor Gene Rhorer.

Details of the agreement are outlined in a settlement document approved by U.S. District Judge Nanette Laughrey in October and obtained by the Missourian through a open records request.

Missouri House members are upset with the head of the state's labor department after the agency it placed liens on the properties of some people who mistakenly received unemployment benefits.

Lawmakers told Labor director Anna Hui Tuesday that they believed the agency agreed last month to stop or slow down collections of unemployment benefits. The Legislature is considering a bill requiring the state to forgive most of the federal payments, which increased dramatically during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Missouri House has advanced a bill that would make daylight saving time permanent.

The GOP-led House gave the proposal initial approval in a voice vote Wednesday. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 15 states have adopted similar provisions. Federal law prevents states from moving to daylight saving time permanently, so the Missouri bill would only take effect if Congress changes federal law.

All eyes are on Minnesota, where a police officer killed another Black motorist just minutes away from the courthouse where Derek Chauvin stands trial in the death of George Floyd. Also, the suspension of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, and the extensive coverage of the death of Prince Philip. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.

Jordan Richards and Tracy Davis both work at The Center Project, an LGBTQ+ resource and community center for Mid-Missouri. They spoke about what Medicaid expansion – or a lack thereof – could mean for transgender Missourians.

Recently, Missouri legislators have stood in the way of funding Medicaid expansion in the state – defying a constitutional amendment that was passed last year by voters – and neighboring states, like Arkansas, are passing legislation which would make providing gender affirming medical treatment to minors illegal.

Meaning it may soon be even more difficult for trans people to access healthcare – gender affirming or otherwise.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Missouri Town Decides to Keep 'Savages' Mascot, Ditch Logo

Apr 14, 2021

Leaders of a nearly all-white northwest Missouri school district have narrowly voted to keep the high school’s “Savages” nickname but will phase out the use of Native American imagery.

The Maryville Daily Forum reports that the Savannah R-3 Board of Education’s 4-3 vote on Tuesday night came after months of dueling petitions and heated debates.

Activists, including those that originally petitioned the board last summer to change the mascot, hoped to have the name and image eradicated.

St. Louis County Council: No Confidence in Police Chief

Apr 14, 2021

The St. Louis County Council in a split vote has declared it has no confidence in county Police Chief Mary Barton.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the council's 4-3 vote Tuesday fell along party lines.

The nonbinding resolution condemned Barton’s leadership, saying the chief was incapable of leading the St. Louis County Police Department “in the right direction.”

Tourist Town of Branson Repeals Mask Mandate Early

Apr 14, 2021

The Missouri tourist town of Branson is ditching its mask mandate early after electing a new mayor who ran on platform that called for doing away with it.

Newly elected Mayor Larry Milton said that the “city heard your voices loud and clear" after the Board of Alderman voted 6-0 on Tuesday night to repeal the public masking ordinance effective Friday.

The ordinance was first enacted July 31 after extensive discussion amid rising COVID-19 case counts.

While it may be new to our area, the concept of a 'human library' actually started more than 20 years in Denmark. This Sunday's event, DBRL's third, in-studio guest LAUREN WILLIAMS says LUCIA OERTER, who joins us via phone, will be talking about her life as a female pastor: "people will either tell me everything they've done in their life that's not so good or they will totally not talk to me." April 14, 2021

Here's a roundup of headlines from the region, including: 


Missouri has joined other states in suspending the use of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine while federal agencies look into six cases in which women who received the single-dose drug developed blood clots.

After years of debate, Kansas City will have a street named for Martin Luther King Jr.

The city's parks and recreation board on Tuesday approved a proposal to rename a 5-mile route along thoroughfares that run east to west after the civil rights icon. City officials and civil rights activists celebrated the decision and vowed that the move was just the first step in larger plans to honor King, and to help foster racial unity in the city.

This week on Discover Nature, while enjoying spring in Missouri, keep a watchful eye to the ground for snakes leaving their winter dens.

   

The eastern copperhead is the most common of Missouri’s five species of venomous snakes. Its color varies from grayish brown to pinkish tan, with distinctive hourglass-shaped crossbands on its back. 

All eyes are on Minnesota, where a police officer killed another Black motorist just minutes away from the courthouse where Derek Chauvin stands trial in the death of George Floyd. Also, the suspension of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, and the extensive coverage of the death of Prince Philip.

There are only four performances left to see Capital City Productions' musical adaptation of the classic Disney film, 'Freaky Friday'. Director SARAH SICHT promises plenty of laughs and a great meal from Argyle Catering! Also, DAYNA GLANZ is back with more good information about the benefits of OsteoStrong, a non-pharmaceutical approach to improving bone health. (3:59) April 13, 2021

Commentary: Trump Explained (Continued)

Apr 13, 2021

I continue to think about the initial and enduring appeal of Donald Trump the man.  I’m also interested in Trump the movement, which is basically an outlet for some people’s authoritarian and/or racist streaks, but that’s for another time.

I was raised and remain a Christian.  I was not raised evangelical, so I can’t pretend to understand why more than 80 percent of evangelicals voted for Trump in 2016 and 2020.  I have close relatives who are evangelical and Trump supporters, and I formulate theories based more on what they do not say about Trump than what they do say.


Moberly Non-Profit Brings Heart, Hope to World of Equine Adoption

Apr 13, 2021
Jozie Crouch / KBIA

Sherri Crider’s young grandchildren jump off a nearby playground set and stumble over each other’s feet to greet us as we walk towards Guardian Oaks Farm. They are able to get back up and seem okay as Crider rushes in a perpendicular direction to go assist a horse about 30 yards away, that is laying on its side, unable to stand.

Sherri Crider sees herself not only as a mother or grandmother, but as a guardian to her farm’s horses. Crider runs Guardian Oaks Farm, a 501(c) non-profit organization which takes in animals that are either neglected or abandoned, or headed for slaughter.

Here's a roundup of regional headlines from the KBIA Newsroom, including:


The Missouri House has voted to ban private businesses from requiring proof of vaccination from either employees or customers.

House lawmakers voted 88-56 Monday to tack the provision on another bill. There appears to be widespread opposition in the Republican-led Legislature to preemptively ban so-called vaccine passports. Vaccine passports are documentation that shows travelers have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

Afternoon Newscasts for April 12, 2021

Apr 12, 2021

Here's a roundup of regional headlines from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

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