News | KBIA

News

A roundup of headlines from across the region, including:

Missouri CAFO Laws Take Effect

Police Leader Considering Recruitment Changes

St. Louis Hospital Investigates Vaping-Related Illnesses

Adult High School To Open In Columbia Tribune Building

Columbia Disabilites Commission Highlights White Cane Law

A roundup of headlines from across the region, including:

Missouri CAFO Laws Take Effect

Police Leader Considering Recruitment Changes

St. Louis Hospital Investigates Vaping-Related Illnesses

Adult High School To Open In Columbia Tribune Building

Columbia Disabilites Commission Highlights White Cane Law

Police leaders in St. Louis County are considering hiring officers without previous police or military experience as it becomes harder to fill openings. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Chief Jon Belmar told the board it is "broadening" opportunities, "not lowering" standards.

Recruitment has become more difficult because of the challenge of the job and an ever-present microscope on police behavior. Despite a tax increase that was used to boost salaries, the department remains 58 shy of its authorized strength of 857 officers.

An adult high school is scheduled to open next month in a building being vacated by the Columbia Daily Tribune. MERS Goodwill is enrolling students now in its new Goodwill Excel Center. It is scheduled to open Oct. 28. It will join MERS Goodwill centers in St. Louis, Springfield and Poplar Bluff.

The school's director, Mike Reynolds, said it will offer high school diplomas, not alternatives, to students who are 21 or older. Students attend at no cost and the school provides free child care. Life coaching skills and workplace certifications also are offered.

Laws clamping down on local representatives’ ability to regulate large livestock operations in Missouri are now in effect.

The highly-debated laws that determine who can regulate concentrated animal feeding operations, known as CAFOs, had been stayed by court order, preventing them from taking effect. But Cole County judge Dan Green lifted that court order this week. Local elected representatives will not be able to pass any laws stricter than state laws that regulate industrial sized farms.

Laws clamping down on local representatives’ ability to regulate large livestock operations in Missouri are now in effect.

The highly-debated laws that determine who can regulate concentrated animal feeding operations, known as CAFOs, had been stayed by court order, preventing them from taking effect. But Cole County judge Dan Green lifted that court order this week. Local elected representatives will not be able to pass any laws stricter than state laws that regulate industrial sized farms.

Drew Piester Photography / Facebook

Fall is just around the corner, and Columbia's Office of Cultural Affairs is getting ready to kick off several major events for the season. Columbia will play host to everything from music festivals, like Roots N Blues, to an African dance and percussion celebration. KBIA spoke with Elise Buchheit from the Columbia Office of Cultural Affairs about the events to look out for this fall. A full list of events can be found at the Office of Cultural Affairs calendar


National Center for Rural School Mental Health

KBIA's Lee Wilkins talks with Wendy Reinke of the new National Center for Rural School Mental Health at the University of Missouri. It's one of three centers in the U.S. with the goal of enhancing the capacity of rural schools to identify, prevent, and intervene in mental health concerns with their students. 

There's still time to get your kayak or canoe ready for the 10th annual Race to the Dome, benefitting Missouri River Relief. KEVIN TOSIE tells us how works and about next month's river clean-up event in Jefferson City! September 13, 2019

AP Photo

Once a refuge for foreign journalists fleeing repression at home, the U.S. risks losing that status.

Like other migrants, journalists who come to the U.S. seeking safety are much more likely to wind up in prisons or federal detention centers - sometimes for months - as their immigratiom cases are considered. Their claims are also being heard by immigration courts that are much more likely to deny asylum requests than they were even a few years ago.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the stories of a Cuban journalist and a Mexican journalist who both found themselves locked up in a country they hoped would provide safety. 


City Confirms Police Chief's Role in Smithton Student Arrest

Sep 12, 2019
Meiying Wu / KBIA

Columbia Police Chief Geoff Jones approved the arrest of a student at Smithton Middle School in January when he was the supervisor of School Resource Officer Tony Ash.

The Missourian reported last week that a police internal investigation found Ash, the school resource officer for all public middle schools, didn’t thoroughly investigate a fight that left a student injured and that he wrongfully arrested a black student at Smithton.

 

The speaker of the Missouri House said he hopes to have a proposal aimed at combatting gun violence ready to debate next year, but critics say action needs to be taken sooner as the death toll mounts in the state's largest cities.

Republican Rep. Elijah Haahr, of Springfield, said some GOP lawmakers are researching what other cities have done to reduce bloodshed as they develop the proposal, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

"Obviously, we've got a bit of time before the next session starts in January," Haahr said.

UM System Asks Missouri Supreme Court to Block Graduate Students' Unionization

Sep 12, 2019
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

The University of Missouri System is asking the state Supreme Court to overturn a decision that declared the university's graduate student workers employees and eligible to unionize.

The request came late Wednesday as lawyers for the university system filed paperwork asking the Supreme Court to take the case, following three consecutive rulings against the university by lower state courts.

Sebastián Martínez Valdivia / KBIA

More than a dozen people testified at an unofficial hearing on decreasing Medicaid enrollment at the capitol Thursday, raising concerns, particularly about the rate of uninsured children in the state.

Legal advocates, activists and private citizens spoke on a range of issues, including the complexity of forms applicants for Medicaid have to fill out to re-enroll, and potential glitches in the renewal system.

Christina Ingoglia, left, wears a black and red blouse and has bright red hair. Michelle Ribaudo, right, wears a striped shirt, black cardigan and glasses.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Christina Ingoglia and Michelle Ribaudo are both board members for the Missouri Disability Empowerment Foundation, or MoDE Foundation, in Columbia. Christina is the current President and Michelle is the current Vice President of this organization that works to advocate for people with disabilities and promote inclusion. 

They spoke about the use of restraint and seclusion rooms for students with special needs and about the potentially dangerous ramifications of such policies.

University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine

KBIA's Lee Wilkins speaks with Dr. Richard Meadows of the MU College of Veterinary Medicine about how to keep your dogs healthy and happy. 

Normally, DR. MAR DOERING, DVM, All Paws Medical and Behavioral Center, shares tips on how to best raise our pooch. Today, she talks about raising our feline friends, who she says, "can be trained and can be socialized." (But they're not small dogs, so don't reach them as such!) September 12, 2019

Mystery Medical Costs, High Drug Prices Targeted By State Lawmakers

Sep 12, 2019

Lawmakers are looking into what the state can do to address the high cost of health care as they prepare for the 2020 legislative session, including making the cost of care more transparent and examining drug prices.

House members held a hearing Wednesday to discuss ways to help Missourians get more information on what medical procedures will cost before choosing a provider. A major theme of the hearing of the House Healthcare Reform Committee was that people struggle to know the real costs of their health care until after their bills come in the mail.

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including:

Missouri lawmakers are backing a bill to ensure that people can continue trading in multiple vehicles to get tax breaks on new cars.

The House on Wednesday voted 126-21 to pass the measure and send it to the Senate. It would allow multiple vehicle trade-ins to be subtracted from the price of a new car, reducing the sales tax to whatever is owed on the discounted car. 

The Missouri Supreme Court overturned the practice in June. Judges ruled that state law only allows one vehicle trade-in to count toward a discounted sales tax.

President Donald Trump has endorsed Missouri Gov. Mike Parson's campaign to keep his seat.

Trump on Tuesday tweeted support for the Republican Missouri governor's 2020 bid. Trump says Parson is "very Popular, Strong, and knows what he is doing." 

Parson faces a challenge from Democratic Auditor Nicole Galloway. She's billing herself as an independent check on Jefferson City through her role as state auditor. But the Democrat faces an uphill battle in a red-leaning state where voters elected Trump by nearly 19 percentage points in 2016.

A Missouri audit report shows that taxpayers spent more than $200,000 to defend former Gov. Eric Greitens' use of a self-deleting text message app.

A 2017 lawsuit alleged Greitens' office used the app Confide to subvert Missouri's open records laws. The case was dismissed in July.

Greitens resigned last year amid allegations of sexual misconduct and campaign violations. 

A wayward turkey vulture caused a power outage for about an hour on the University of Missouri campus.

University spokeswoman Liz McCune said 27 buildings and four parking structures were without power this morning. The buildings included Jesse Hall, Ellis Library, the Student Center and five dormitories. 

Officials say the outage happened after a turkey vulture's wing hit a connector that links the university to the city's power grid.

The vulture died in the incident.

The ripple effects of disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein widen, as the head of the revered head of the MIT Media Lab resigns after accepting a donation from Epstein. What did he know at the time of the gift? Also, new guidelines for newsrooms to protect female #journalists from online harassment, controversy at NPR over the coverage of #race and the #WorldTradeCenter on film, 18 years after the September 11th terror attacks. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

The local group Race Matters, Friends is calling for the resignation of Columbia Public Schools’ chief equity officer Carla London.

The group officially made the call last week in a letter saying, “The district has been unable to provide RMF with evidence that Ms. London’s equity training program is meaningfully addressing the racial disparities in out-of-school suspensions, harassment, bullying and attendance.”

Later this month, the League of Women Voters is hosting two events at the Columbia Public Library. MARILYN McLEOD tells us about both, one of which is a panel discussion about women judges and will feature Ann Covington, the first woman to serve on the Missouri Supreme Court. Also, In2Action executive director DAN HANNEKEN is back to talk about how his prisoner reform program should matter to everyone and is in need of volunteers. (4:10) September 11, 2019

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