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Eleven candidates are running for mayor of Kansas City, Missouri.

Residents will cast their votes in the primary on April 2, narrowing the field to two candidates ahead of the general election on June 18. Residents will also be asked to vote for city council members, and to weigh in on a plan proposed by outgoing Mayor Sly James to fund pre-kindergarten education with a ⅜ cents sales tax that would generate $30 million a year for the next ten years.

Over the weekend, Muslim mental health professionals quickly pulled together a webinar to share advice on how to deal with trauma after the New Zealand terrorist attacks on Friday. A white supremacist killed at least 50 people as they prayed in two mosques.

Psychiatrists and spiritual leaders doled out advice on self-care and how to help young Muslims work through this moment.

It’s no longer news that when it comes to its residents’ health, Wyandotte County ranks near the bottom of Kansas counties and Johnson County ranks at the top.

A federal jury in San Francisco has unanimously decided that Bayer AG’s weed killer Roundup caused a California resident to develop cancer.

Edwin Hardeman alleged in his suit that using the herbicide over three decades on his properties caused him to develop non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a cancer that affects the immune system. His lawsuit is the first federal court case against Bayer’s Roundup and could predict the outcome of hundreds of cases that the company faces for similar claims. Bayer bought St. Louis-based Monsanto, maker of Roundup, last year.

About 60 percent of the approximately 70,000 Missourians purged from the state’s Medicaid program in 2018 lost coverage because they failed to reply to a mailed renewal form, according to state data.

The Missouri Department of Social Services started using an automated system to determine residents’ Medicaid eligibility last year. If the system couldn’t find their information, the state mailed enrollees renewal forms to complete and return.

Some health experts and state officials are concerned people otherwise eligible for the program are living without insurance because they never received the mail.

Conservation agencies are doubling down on their efforts to track down the poacher who shot two elk in south-central Missouri in February.  According to the Missouri Department of Conversation, the person who shot and killed the two elk didn’t use any of the animal parts.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

The White House says President Trump will nominate Stephen Dickson, a former executive and pilot at Delta Air Lines, to lead the Federal Aviation Administration.

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The terrorist attack in New Zealand that killed at least 50 people as they prayed in their mosques sent shockwaves throughout the world. But in the U.S., many young Muslims say they weren't surprised. They're a generation that has been raised in the midst of anti-Muslim rhetoric, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, mass shootings and now rising hate crimes. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports, mental health experts are worried about the lasting impact on this generation.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The terrorist attack in New Zealand that killed at least 50 people as they prayed in their mosques sent shockwaves throughout the world. But in the U.S., many young Muslims say they weren't surprised. They're a generation that has been raised in the midst of anti-Muslim rhetoric, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, mass shootings and now rising hate crimes. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports, mental health experts are worried about the lasting impact on this generation.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The terrorist attack in New Zealand that killed at least 50 people as they prayed in their mosques sent shockwaves throughout the world. But in the U.S., many young Muslims say they weren't surprised. They're a generation that has been raised in the midst of anti-Muslim rhetoric, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, mass shootings and now rising hate crimes. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports, mental health experts are worried about the lasting impact on this generation.

On a drizzly day earlier this month, a gaggle of mostly Chinese protesters gathered outside a provincial Supreme Court in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. Inside the court, an extradition hearing was underway to decide whether to send Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese tech giant Huawei, to be prosecuted in the United States.

Purim, a Jewish holiday with roots in the book of Esther, begins on March 20.

Purim is a Jewish holiday that celebrates the foiling of Haman’s plan to eradicate the Jewish people according to the biblical book of Esther.

Rabbi Barbara Block of Temple Israel said that Purim is a unique celebration.

Humanitarian aid groups are rescuing survivors of Cyclone Idai which swept through Mozambique and Malawi before hitting Zimbabwe. The storm rapidly inundated communities with torrential rain, creating inland oceans in Mozambique.

Sacha Myers of Save the Children, in Mozambique, told NPR, "The situation at the moment, in Mozambique ... is getting worse by the hour. The area is already inundated by floods that hit the area last month. The cyclone has come through. It has destroyed everything in its path." Myers says 100,000 people in Mozambique alone need urgent rescue.

This interview will be on “St. Louis on the Air” at noon Wednesday. This story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

St. Louis on the Air’s monthly Legal Roundtable will get underway Wednesday as host Don Marsh delves into a variety of recent local and national stories pertaining to the law.

The discussion is expected to touch on regional matters including pretrial detention at the city’s medium-security Workhouse, the latest news surrounding the Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office and the police department, and the proposed Missouri legislation that would change Title IX procedures at colleges and universities in the state, among other topics.

Joining the discussion will be William Freivogel, J.D., journalism professor at Southern Illinois University Carbondale; local attorney Nicole Gorovsky, J.D.; and retired Missouri Appellate Court Judge Lisa Van Amburg, J.D.

Segment 1: Missouri House minority leader explained her party can still manage to get issues across the finish line.

Representative Crystal Quade says her run for leadership was motivated by a desire to help Democrats through a time of rebuilding and she's one of the first millenials to do so in Missouri. The second-term legislator explained that building relationships with Republicans and finding issues they can agree on is more important than who gets the credit.

With Meghna Chakrabarti

California Gov. Gavin Newsom halts the death penalty in his state and takes his case to the national stage. We unpack the politics and public opinion.


Want more from the show? You can get messages right from our hosts (and more opportunities to engage with the show) sent directly to your inbox with the On Point newsletter. Subscribe here.

Find our buildout from this hour, featuring a partial transcription, here.


With Meghna Chakrabarti

Snipping an infant’s tongue can improve breastfeeding. But is the surgery overused or even medically necessary?

Mayor 101

6 hours ago

The race for mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, is crowded with candidates. Today, we zoom out and take a look at the job they want. While a lot of candidates campaign on reducing crime and providing basic city services, it turns out that the mayor isn't in charge of the police department or snow removal. So what exactly is the mayor's role, and how does that fit in with the city council and city manager? What's the mayor of Kansas City actually responsible for? We'll ask the questions so you can focus on who to vote for.

Guests:

Recent weeks have seen an upsurge in direct, and often deadly, attacks against the health workers trying to respond to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in Democratic Republic of the Congo.

But the pileup of incidents can obscure a crucial feature of the trend: The attacks actually fall into two very different categories.

In the first bucket are coordinated assaults by organized groups such as criminal gangs or the dozens of rebel militia that have long clashed with the government.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

After years of criticism and multiple lawsuits alleging that Facebook engaged in discrimination by allowing advertisers to select which users could see their ads, the social media giant announced it will make changes to its ad platform by the end of the year.

"I find that I am bored with anything I understand," Karen Uhlenbeck once said - and that sense of curiosity is part of why she won the prestigious Abel Prize, from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters.

Uhlenbeck, an influential mathematician who was for decades a professor at the University of Texas at Austin and who has sought to encourage women to study mathematics, has become the first woman to win the Abel Prize — often called the Nobel Prize of math.

The U.S. surgeon general's office estimates that more than 20 million people have a substance-use disorder. Meanwhile, the nation's drug overdose crisis shows no sign of slowing.

Yet, by all accounts, there aren't nearly enough physicians who specialize in treating addiction — doctors with extensive clinical training who are board certified in addiction medicine.

When Frans de Waal started studying nonhuman primates, in the Netherlands more than 40 years ago, he was told not to consider the emotions of the animals he was observing.

"Thoughts and feelings — the mental processes basically — were off limits," he says. "We were told not to talk about them, because they were considered by many scientists as 'inner states' and you only were allowed to talk about 'outer states.' "

Kansas City Symphony Hires New Executive Director

10 hours ago

The Kansas City Symphony wrapped up its seven-month national search for a new executive director and hired Daniel Beckley, the Kansas City Business Journal reports.

Beckley most recently was vice president and general manager of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.

Beckley succeeds Frank Byrne, who's retiring this year after a 19-year tenure.

The president of the Japanese Olympic Committee said he will step down amid allegations of corruption into the successful bid for Tokyo to host the 2020 Olympics.

Tsunekazu Takeda, 71, is a former Olympic equestrian jumper who competed at the 1972 and 1976 Olympics. He is also the chair of the International Olympic Committee's Marketing Commission.

He maintains his innocence and intends to serve out the rest of his 10th term as president, resigning in June. He'll also step down from the IOC.

Authorities are looking into whether the suspect in last week's terror attack on two mosques in New Zealand was inspired by an emerging, European-based breed of white nationalism. The identitarian movement, formed in France in 2016, broadly believes that white people in Europe and North America are being displaced by non-European immigrants.

Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev says he will resign the post he has held for nearly 30 years, abruptly announcing the end of an era that began in the early 1990s. But Nazarbayev, 78, also said he'll keep several key official posts, in a speech that aired on national TV Tuesday.

In the former Soviet bloc, formerly comprised of 15 countries, Nazarbayev is the only longstanding leader to sustain power for three decades. The president of Uzbekistan, Islam Karimov, died in 2016 after his presidential reign of 26 years.

Having a stroke or a traumatic brain injury can make you feel like a foreigner in a strange land. Your cognition may still be fully intact, but sometimes you just can't speak the language.

After a stroke, most individuals need speech therapy, something that is offered free at Missouri State University's Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic, and they often recoup much of their language. If you haven't recouped it all, you may become your own worse critic. This makes it difficult to engage in everyday social situations. You may feel embarrassed and become isolated.

From the front, the unassuming Nashville building that's home to Dan Auerbach's Easy Eye Studio looks like a place more likely to house drab offices than creative labor. In fact, its proprietor confirms a call center once operated inside its walls before he bought the facility and had tracking and control rooms built to his specifications.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

As floodwaters begin to recede, Vice President Pence announced in a tweet that he would visit Nebraska on Tuesday to take stock of the devastation.

His visit comes as 74 cities, 65 counties and four tribal areas have declared states of emergency in Nebraska, according to the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency.

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