Dr. David Cornelison | KBIA

Dr. David Cornelison

Dr. David Cornelison has been working as an educator and scientist in Arizona and Missouri universities for the last 25 years.  Since 2010, he has been the head of the Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science at Missouri State University.  His research interests lie at the intersection of experimental condensed-matter physics and astrophysics, while his educational efforts have focused on outreach to the K-12 school system.   Most of all, he believes in curiosity-driven learning in the sciences and all other fields.

In this episode, Dave talks with Damon Bassett, professor of geology at Missouri State University, about the process of fossilization and DNA extraction research.


Copyright 2020 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

To commemorate Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, Maja Kotlaja and Anna Cohen come on STEM Spots to talk about the importance of health screening before the age of 50.


Copyright 2020 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

This episode, Dave talks about the play Oppenheimer, and the man who inspired the story. Take a dive into Dave's retelling of the life of the juggernaut of nuclear physics, J. Robert Oppenheimer.


Copyright 2020 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

Dave has an in-depth historical discussion with Dr. Etta Madden, an English professor at Missouri State University, about the link between science and literature.


Copyright 2020 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

In this episode Dave talks with Dr. Ralph Shain, a professor of philosophy at MSU, about time, measurement, and philosophical questions in physics.


Copyright 2020 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

This week, Dave interviews Loring Bullard of the James River Basin partnership, about water conservation efforts. Loring Bullard served 23 years as director of the Watershed Committee of the Ozarks.


Copyright 2020 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

In this episode of STEM Spots, Dave muses about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and diversity in STEM, particularly in physics.


Copyright 2020 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

Dave interviews Dr. Paul Deal, an associate professor and department head of Psychology at Missouri State University, about the role of IQ tests in psychology, research, and culture.


Copyright 2020 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

Dr. David Cornelison muses about technology in this week's episode.

Copyright 2019 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

  When thinking of astronomy, we often envision telescopes and pictures of objects in the sky.  To understand the systems fully, those items are certainly necessary...but not sufficient.  To gain a complete picture, we must compare our observations to the physical laws that govern the entire universe.  That process requires simulation, using comput

As many people know, Computer Science is a burgeoning field, with students flocking to it in their search for a suitable major.  But what really does the major entail and what will students do with their degrees

In this edition of STEM Spots, Dave Cornelison talks with Rhonda Lesley, director of the Missouri State University Counseling Center, about counseling services and issues faced by college students.


Copyright 2019 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

Physics plays a large role in the field of medicine.  Just think about the techniques used to identify illness, with X-rays, MRI, ultrasound and nuclear imaging.  They all spring directly from research done in physics labs.  But less obvious is the use of physics in the treatment of disease, especially cancer, where high energy X-rays are the most common tool.  The specialized training required for

Dave Cornelison interviews Abdullah Al Shafe, a material sciences student at Missouri State University, discussing his background in Bangladesh and his metallurgical engineering studies.


Copyright 2019 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

Dave Cornelison speaks with MSU alumnus Steve Nunn, a formal naval scientist, about his work with speech recognition and his projects at MSU.

Copyright 2019 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

From a physicists point of view, the study of materials is intended to give insight into the fundamental processes at work.  However, the scientists at MSU are also working to incorporate their findings into practical long-term applications.  Dr. Kartik Ghosh, a Distinguished Professor of Physics, has been doing this sort of work in Springfield for many years.  He stops by STEM Spots to talk about his efforts, collaborators and the atmosphere of diversity needed to get the job done.

When thinking of all the solids we use in our everyday life, it is striking how many are made by humans instead of occurring naturally.

STEM Spots host Dr. David Cornelison discusses the effects of climate change with geoscientist and MSU professor Toby Dogwiler. The topics range from research into the effects of climate change and possible responses to the changing world.


Copyright 2019 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

We all know that many plants need pollinating and that this activity is crucial to the agriculture on which we depend.  However, in most cases, our understanding can be somewhat simplistic, centering on the honeybee and its relationship with various flowers.  It turns out the interactions between pollinators, of which there are many besides honeybees, and plants is a complicated one.

We all know that many plants need pollinating and that this activity is crucial to the agriculture on which we depend.  However, in most cases, our understanding can be somewhat simplistic, centering on the honeybee and its relationship with various flowers.  It turns out the interactions between pollinators, of which there are many besides honeybees, and plants is a complicated one.

It is now well known that planets orbit nearly every star we can see.  Astronomers are constantly working to fill in the details and understand the development of solar systems from the wide array of candidates visible to us.  This work is done initially by space-based satellites, as finding the exoplanets requires large telescopes and is best done outside the earth’s distorting atmosphere.  However, to lock down the characteristics of the detected bodies requires extensive follow-up work, some of

Students at Missouri State University are always on the lookout for extracurricular activities to complement the coursework in their majors. 

So when students in the Mechanical Engineering Technology program learned about a national competition sponsored by the Society of Automotive Engineers, they jumped at the chance to participate. 

A month of research at in Nebraska has given host Dr. David Cornelison the opportunity to meet two people who see things as he does, at least on the subject of science.   From the University of Nebraska physics department, Jocelyn Bosley and Brad Nordell have a new role to play as podcasts hosts.  Their new podcast, “Science! With Friends” focuses on the who behind the what in science.  


Host David Cornelison interviews Nicholas Rogers, a student at Missouri State, about his impressions of his summer program in Lincoln, Nebraska. 

From the differences in equipment, knowledge, and research techniques, the discussion explores the opportunities offered to students in different locations.


As everyone in the Ozarks knows, small animals abound in our environment.  Many of these are mammals and each has an array of parasitic guests on their person.  Sean Maher is a biologist at Missouri State University and he is mapping out the distribution of various animals and their accompanying “bugs” in locales throughout the region.  Through this work, he is correlating environmental characteristics with the populations.  In doing so,  he hopes to learn more about the connections between population size and health with the supporting ecosystem in which the animals live. 

For the last couple decades, a standard refrain, h

Pages