Gina Kaufmann | KBIA

Gina Kaufmann

Gina’s background combines print and broadcast journalism, live event hosting and production, creative nonfiction writing and involvement in the arts. Early in her career, she followed a cultural beat for The Pitch, where she served as an editor and art writer in the early 2000s.

She also worked as a contributing editor of Heeb magazine out of New York, assisting with the Heeb Storytelling series and ultimately starting her own live storytelling event series in Kansas City. Gina got her public radio chops working first as an intern for KC Currents with Sylvia Maria Gross, then as a co-host of The Walt Bodine Show.

She earned her bachelor’s degree from Columbia University and her Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia.

Free-Range Kids

Sep 25, 2018

Is the world today more dangerous for children? Or are parents being overprotective? On this episode, we dive into a conversation about parenting and free-range kids.

Guest:

Monarch Butterflies

Sep 24, 2018

It's that time of year when monarch butterflies emerge from cocoons in our area to join the butterflies migrating south to Mexico. On this episode, we learn what's at stake for monarch butterflies and the environment. Plus, we learn how to create a monarch waystation

This Artist Is Not In Kansas Anymore: Angela Dufresne's Journey From Olathe To New York City

Integration Of Schools

Sep 20, 2018

Almost 65 years after the landmark ruling of Brown v. Board of Education that desegragated public schools, research suggests U.S. schools are resegregating and, in some places, are more segregated than ever. On this episode, we dive into a discussion about how much of a priority integration plays in Kansas City metro schools.

Segment 1: Is housing really as affordable for Kansas Citians as we say it is?

A new study finds housing in Kansas City isn't as affordable for low-income residents as we would like. We discuss the study, the recommendations for improvement presented to the city council and what is to come.

Segment 2, beginning at 11:55: Goat Yoga. Need we say more?

Is there a correlation between the way we relate to objects and the way we treat our relationships with people? A KU researcher has found that when we treat everything else as expendable … we may unwittingly treat human beings that way, too.

Guests:

Seg. 1: Unschooling. Seg. 2: Feral Cats

Sep 13, 2018

Segment 1: To school or unschool, that is the question.

Unschooling combines the ideals of Montessori schools with homeschooling; letting kids dictate their education. We talk about the pros and cons with a local homeschooler and an adolescent psychologist.

Segment 1: Millennials are largely for gender equality, but they aren't so crazy about the term 'feminism.' We discuss Dr. Cathy Cohen's study with her as well as with an activist and local Kansas Citians. 

Segment 1: Art isn't just fun and games.

To some, art seems more like a hobby rather than ‘real work.’ But, for many artists, that’s far from the truth. We visit with a Kansas Citian about what they discovered after being an artist for a year.

Segment 2, beginning at 23:03: How World War I sparked a lasting friendship between the United States and Australia.

Segment 1: Growing up is hard, just ask writer and critic Michelle Tea. 

Her road to adulthood wasn't always an easy one, but she made it there. Today, Michelle Tea told us about growing up in poverty and about her coming of age as a queer person in an unwelcoming culture. She offered her perspective on how to find your way as a young artist.

Segment 1: The history behind Brush Creek and where it is today.

On this episode, we find out how Brush Creek, a once natural body of water, became a dual-purpose sewage system and recreation area. Hint: it starts with Pendergast and cement.

Segment 1: Tailgating is more than an activity in Kansas City. It's a culture.

Tailgating is a big deal to local sports fans. Why is that and what's the meaning behind it? On this episode, we explore those questions and more in light of a controversial new tailgating policy at Arrowhead Stadium.

Segment 1: Artistic director of the KC Rep is leaving soon. How has local theatre changed?

After 10 years with the Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Eric Rosen is saying farewell to Kansas City. We chat with the artistic director about how the local theatre scene has changed during his tenure.

Segment 2, beginning at 22:50: What do audiences expect from local theatrical productions?

Segment 1: Local man's shares story behind an American prison riot during the Vietnam War.

50 years have passed since a riot occured at a notorious American military prison in Vietnam. A jail to house not enemy fighters, but American soldiers. On this episode, we learn about a Kansas City native's involvement in the uprising and the meaning behind it. 

Segment 1: Big development shifts in Kansas City's East Bottoms.

There's been a lot of economic buzz in the East Bottoms lately. A local distillery looks to expand operations to the historic Heim Brewery bottling plant, while a well-known meat shop moves out to a new location in the River Market. On this episode, we discuss the past, present, and future of the East Bottoms.

Segment 1: What is it really like to be a woman in law enforcement?

On this episode, we speak with women from local police departments to hear their perspectives on serving in law enforcement.

  • Sgt. Heather Massey, Liberty Police Department
  • Sgt. Melanie Madonia, Kansas City Police Department
  • Maj. Dawn Layman, Lenexa Police Department

Segment 2, beginning at 37:37: Racial tensions in Westport.

Pedestrian Life In Kansas City

Aug 23, 2018

With more neighborhoods and municipalities considering 'walkability' as a goal, is the pedestrian experience in Kansas City improving? On this episode, we discuss the obstacles preventing us from having a safe, thriving pedestrian culture in Kansas City.

Segment 1: A new documentary illustrates the tension between police and African-American communities.

Black and Blue is a new documentary by Kansas City native Solomon Bass. In it, he follows a former police officer named Donald Carter, who struggles with the question of being both black and a police officer. Solomon Bass joins us to talk about the story behind the documentary.

Segment 1: 2018 has been an interesting year for politics in Clay County.

From a grassroots petition to audit the Clay County government to controversy surrounding a candidate running for Missouri House District 15, we look at meaningful headlines affecting communities north of the river.

  • Amy Neal, Regional News Director for NPG Newspapers in the Northland

Segment 2, beginning at 15:59: Many Americans have polarizing viewpoints on the media. The truth is even more complicated.

Segment 1: The Queen of Soul passed away last week. We pause to remember her legacy.

As the filmmaker's latest collaboration with Spike Lee becomes the must-see movie of the moment, we talk to Kevin Willmott about BlacKkKlansman, race in America, the purpose of satire, and his own life story, which begins in Junction City, Kansas. This hour-long interview is part of our Portrait Session series.

Segment 1: There are a lot of acronyms in education. How do those phrases affect kids?

In the education world, 'STEM learning' refers to an emphasis on science, technology, engineering and math. Shortly afterwards, arts and reading were thrown into the mix changing the acronym from STEM to STEAM and now STREAM. On this episode, we dive into a conversation on how terminology and buzzwords shape modern learning.

Segment 1: 10 years have passed since the Recession. How are people doing now?

In the depths of the Great Recession, KCUR did a series of interviews about how the economic downturn was affecting people's lives. On this episode, we look back to find out how a couple of interviewees are faring now.

Segment 1: The average age of the U.S. farmer is 60. Who will step up to feed America?

A recent documentary looks at the challenges the next generation of farmers in America are experiencing.

There's been a lot of attention on the recent spate of shootings and homicides in Kansas City. On this episode, we take a deeper look into what's happening now in regards to violent crime, compare it with the broader trends of Kansas City and learn about the actions both activist groups and the city government are taking to prevent it. 

Guests:

Segment 1: Summer may be close to ending, but canning season is just getting started.

From jams to mustards to pickles, we'll hear how a husband and wife took an interest in canning and turned it into a business.

Segment 2, beginning at 16:09: The food critics share their favorite sandwiches in town.

Segment 1: Study on black, queer-identifying men takes new approach to research.

A new study spearheaded by a local grassroots organization conducted a comprehensive health and wellness assessment for black, queer-identifying men in Kansas City. We hear about what they learned.

  • D. Rashaan Gilmore, president and founder, BlaqOut

Segment 2, beginning at 21:36: The status of women's baseball in Kansas City.

The several waterways that weave through Kansas City make a big impact on shaping The Metro. Especially after heavy rains. On this episode, we learn how flooding shaped our city.

Guests:

Segment 1: Remembering a Kansas artist who made furniture as he made sculptures.

Wendell Castle revolutionized art. The Holton, Kansas, native was known as the father of the studio furniture movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Hear his story and what he meant to the art world.

Segment 1: New voters are projected to make a huge impact on the upcoming midterm elections. 

Pages