Hope Kirwan

Reporter/Producer

Hope Kirwan left KBIA in September 2015.

Hope Kirwan is a reporter/producer for KBIA's Health & Wealth Desk. Originally from Macomb, IL, she is a graduate of the University of Missouri with a degree in Broadcast Journalism. Previously she worked as a student reporter for KBIA and also reported for Tri States Public Radio in Macomb.

 

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The film, The Immitation Game, carries a PG-13 rating and The New York Times warns the film contains illicit sex, cataclysmic violence & advanced math?! Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

 


via Flickr user Gordon Correll

Comedian Chris Rock is on a publicity tour, promoting his new film Top Five. In multiple interviews Rock is asked about his reactions to the recent events in Ferguson and his take on racism in America. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

The University of Missouri is known for it’s School of Journalism. Every year, hundreds of freshmen from across the country come to school at MU to learn about news or sports broadcasting. But KBIA’s Jason Hoffman found one freshman who’s career in sports radio has an added challenge: He's blind.


Janay Rice speaks out

Dec 4, 2014
via Flickr user mdennes

On Friday, former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice won his appeal. A judge ruled the NFL’s indefinite suspension against him be vacated. In the wake of this news, ESPN released an essay written by Rice’s wife, Janay, who became a public figure after a video of an altercation between the two was leaked to the media. ESPN said no questions were off limits but final control over the essay and its publication was left up to Janay. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


healthcare.gov

  Last week marked the beginning of open enrollment for the federal health insurance marketplace, and on the surface it appears not much has changed. By some measures premiums before tax credits are just as affordable as last year - decreasing on average by about one percent according to a report by the Kaiser Family Foundation. But to be a savvy shopper, many consumers should give the marketplace a second look.


Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen.

http://www.9jumpin.com.au/

  Karl Stefanovic, the anchor of Australia’s Today Show, wanted to see if anyone would notice if he wore the same blue suit for a year. No one noticed! Meanwhile, if his co-host wore the same outfit more than once a week, she got critical emails and calls from viewers. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

An executive of the app-based ride-sharing company, unhappy with critical media coverage, suggested it should dig up personal information about journalists and make it public. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

  

The Healthcare Equality Index is a national benchmarking tool that ranks hospitals based on whether their policies and practices include equal treatment for the LGBT community. Missouri’s standing in this index jumped from 37th  in the nation to 6th in just one year.

I spoke with Andrew Shaughnessy, Public Policy Manager of the Missouri LGBT advocacy organization PROMO, about why this ranking is so important and what it means for Missouri. 

    

ipad, student
Brad Flickinger / Flickr

  By the year 2021, every student in the Columbia Public Schools (CPS) district from fifth grade on will have a personal electronic device.

“This year we started one to one in all of our fifth grade classes with iPad minis. So, our fifth grade kids and students are learning to kind of digitize their curriculum and next year they will be sixth graders, and so we’ll give another group of fifth graders iPads and it’ll continue on their way up,” CPS Coordinator of Instructional Technology Julie Nichols said.

  Jake Gyllenhaal's character in the new movie 'Nightcrawler,' makes a name for himself shooting videos of crime scenes and selling them to news channels...but how much of that happens in real life? Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

glenn beck
The Blaze

Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck told fans that for the past few years, he’s been suffering from a mysterious neurological illness. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


#Pointergate

Nov 13, 2014

KSTP-TV accused the Minneapolis Mayor of throwing up gang signs after she was photographed with a black constituent. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    

LGBT, pride
nathanmac87 / Flickr


  Last month, the Human Rights Campaign called on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to address LGBT discrimination in healthcare.

Sarah Warbelow is the Legal Director for the Human Rights Campaign, a national LGBT advocacy organization. She said many LGBT individuals are hesitant to seek care based on a history of discrimination by healthcare providers.

school, music
Ashley Reese / KBIA

 

  We conclude our three part series called A Teachable Moment, which looks at how events in Ferguson are being talked about in St. Louis-area classrooms and schools. Later on in the show, we’ll hear how small grants awarded to teachers in Columbia Public Schools can make a big difference in the classroom.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

Access Missouri is a collaboration between KBIA, The Missouri Informatics Institute and The Truman School of Public Affairs here at MU. The site is a portal designed to collect publicly available data on Lawmakers. So far there have been more than 5,000 unique users, on the site that launched less than a week ago. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

This week, we continue our series called A Teachable Moment, which looks at how issues related to Ferguson are being discussed in area classrooms. Later on in the show, we’ll hear how Missouri’s Common Core rewrite may not produce education standards that are very different from the current standards.


Alberto G. / Flickr

  Since September, parents, educators and business leaders have been working to try to rewrite the Common Core standards. Missouri first adopted Common Core in 2010 and is one of 45 states using the national standards for grades K-12.

So far, the committees in charge of rewriting Common Core have had meetings full of heated arguments and lots of confusion as they try to prepare a recommendation for the Board of Education by October 2015.

I spoke with Dr. Barbara Reys, Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum at MU, about why these committees may not be able to make the best decisions about education in Missouri.

receipt
Brad Montgomery / Flickr

It’s a well known fact that fast food contributes to poor overall health. But what about the receipt that comes with those yummy French fries?

I sat down with MU researcher Dr. Fredrick vom Saal, whose recently published work shows how fast food receipts expose us to a dangerous endocrine disrupting chemical called BPA.


Hope Kirwan / KBIA

Democratic Rep. John Wright said in an email Tuesday morning that his plan was to “rotate to a couple of different watch parties” on Election Night. His run to represent Missouri’s 47th district against Chuck Bayse was one of the election’s highly contested races.

@CBCNews / Twitter

What would you consider the benchmarks of breaking news coverage? Wall-to-wall coverage with breathless anchors repeating the same sparse details over and over again, speculating on what they could mean, what could be happening and who might be involved? American television journalists got schooled last week, when a gunman opened fire at the Canadian Parliament. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

KBIA

  Last week, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch misquoted forensic expert, Dr. Judy Melinek's interpretation of Michael Brown’s autopsy. The Post-Dispatch stood by their original report until yesterday when it added an editor's note to the story saying Dr. Melinek wanted to clarify her statements. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

farmer
Robert S. Donovan / Flickr

 

 

 

When people think of the United States Department of Agriculture, they of course think about things related to agriculture - farms, crops, livestock.

But Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said the USDA is about much more than that. It’s really about improving the quality of life in rural areas.  

“It's important I think because of the people who live in rural America and the contributions they make to the rest of the country," Vilsack said.

  Every second Monday, Broadway Brewery in downtown Columbia is packed by 6:00 p.m. Half of the restaurant is filled with people having dinner or a beer at the bar. But on the other side, tables and chairs are packed into a crowded space for this month’s Science Cafe.

Science Cafe is a community program started by the Bond Life Sciences Center at MU. Each month, the Cafe brings a different researcher or professor to give a lecture about their field of study.

But this lesson isn’t like the ones you’ll find at school.

  This week, we are beginning a series that profiles how issues raised by events in Ferguson intersect with what's happening in area classrooms.

 

As the months have passed since protests erupted following the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, some educators are beginning to weave Ferguson into their lesson plans.

 

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