Hope Kirwan

Reporter/Producer

Hope Kirwan left KBIA in September 2015.

Hope Kirwan is a reporter/producer for KBIA's Health & Wealth Desk. Originally from Macomb, IL, she is a graduate of the University of Missouri with a degree in Broadcast Journalism. Previously she worked as a student reporter for KBIA and also reported for Tri States Public Radio in Macomb.

 

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State Senator Chappell critical of Nixon's plans

Oct 27, 2014
Missouri Senate

  State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal continues to criticize the governor. She says Nixon’s plans for a new commission to study social unrest inflamed by Ferguson shooting come too late to help the community.

“The Governor and his approach should have occurred year ago if not 77 days ago," Chappelle-Nadal said. "To have a commission is very easy and simple to do. It is 'low hanging fruit.'”

Nixon's commission first order of business will be to conduct a study of underlying social and economic conditions that creates unrest in Ferguson.

Last week, the National Association of Black Journalists issued a press release citing concern with the atmosphere and working conditions for African-Americans at the cable network. CNN responded by saying it was reconsidering its sponsorship of NABJ events. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Remembering Ben Bradlee

Oct 22, 2014
via Flickr user Miguel Ariel Contreras Drake-McLaughlin

 Ben Bradlee, former top editor at the Washington Post, died at his Washington, D.C. home Tuesday. He was 93 years old. Bradlee ran the paper for more than 26 years, taking over in 1965, and transforming it into one of the nation's strongest daily newspapers of record. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Women's Foundation

In partnership with the Institute of Public Policy at MU, the Women’s Foundation of Kansas City is collecting information about Missouri women for a public database, including things like income and employment, education, childcare and health.  I spoke with Wendy Doyle, President and CEO of the Women’s Foundation, about how the project could have an impact on women's issues in Missouri.

Ashley Reese / KBIA


  It’s harvest time in Mid-Missouri and students at some Columbia Public Schools are getting the opportunity to learn about the science behind their favorite foods. These new lessons are thanks to a partnership with the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture.

Courtesy NIAID

The Associated Press has said it won't be reporting every instance in which an individual is tested for Ebola. The goal of the media should not be to create undue fear among the population. How much of the reporting out there is helpful, how much is creating panic? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Courtesy NBC

NBC Cheif Medical Editor, Dr. Nancy Snyderman, broke her voluntary Ebola quarantine to go get takeout from her favorite restaurant. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss NBC’s released statement on the issue and weigh in on whether Snyderman should have personally apologized for the incident. ​

Shardayyy / Flickr

Studies have shown that students who went to preschool have higher rates of achievement later in school. It's also believed that preschool has a positive effect on children’s social and emotional development.

But the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has identified several areas of the state where families don’t have access to quality preschools. The state has applied for a grant through the U.S. Department of Education to expand the state’s program in these high-need areas. Missouri is competing with 16 other states for the Preschool Development grant, which will be awarded by the end of December.

KBIA’s Hope Kirwan sat down with Stacey Preis, Assistant Commissioner for the Office of Early and Extended Learning, to talk about Missouri’s need to expand preschool education.


Jason Hoffman / KBIA

  Title IX and the prevalence of sexual violence on college campuses have been national concerns over the past year. We'll take a look at what inspired lawmakers and school administrators take action against sexual assault on campus and hear how their efforts may not be what's best for students.


Hope Kirwan / KBIA

  

Matt Gibbens has been riding all-terrain vehicles, or ATVs, for a long time, but he’s never taken a safety course.

“I know there's a lot of them out there but I've just grown up on them,” Gibbens said.

Gibbens grew up on a farm and said he’s used ATVs for both work and play. But despite his experience with the machine, he’s still dressed from head to toe in protective gear, including a helmet, goggles, and chest protector.

Gibbens said he thinks about safety every time he gets on his ATV.

Columbia College
File Photo / KBIA


Scott Dalrymple began serving as the president of Columbia College last May. KBIA’s Liying Qian caught up with Dalrymple after a presentation he gave last month, to discuss his first few months as president.

Timothy Maylander / KBIA


  Since his arrival at the University of Missouri last February, Chancellor Bowen Loftin has inspired several changes. He recently announced a voluntary separation program that could serve as an incentive for retirement for tenured faculty members. KBIA’s Ashley Reese talked with several MU professors about why this program might encourage some of the university’s best professors to leave.

Greg Riegler / Flickr

Around 1950, cities in the U.S began adding fluoride to the water supply as a way to reduce tooth decay. And ever since, water fluoridation has been a debated issue. Despite evidence that fluoride treatment is beneficial to oral health, the town of Waynesville, Mo. recently voted to stop adding fluoride to its water system. 

But ending water fluoridation in Waynesville didn’t involve activists, budget cuts or a heated debate.

Courtesy WMC-TV

    If we're being honest, we laugh at people on television who accidentally say curse words, or reporters and photographers who have to react quickly before a bad situation gets worse. But, we rarely know the story behind the story. Here's one of those. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

  Mizzou student Alex Talleur volunteers at the Community Garden at Kilgore’s Medical Pharmacy in Columbia.

As Talleur pulled green, prickly cucumbers from the yellowing vines, he said he’s envious of the kids who will be munching on the fresh produce in a few days.

"When I think of schools or anything like that, I always think of the greasy cafeteria food," Talleur said. "Having an opportunity to have really healthy, homegrown food is really great."

    The pressure is on for big-name NFL advertisers, like CoverGirl cosmetics, to pull their ad dollars after the Ray Rice domestic abuse scandal. How has the news media contributed to the discussion? Should companies pull ads? Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

COD Newsroom / Flickr

  

Primary health care is no longer limited to the family doctor. With the growing popularity of clinics like the new Mizzou Quick Care, nurse practitioners are becoming more involved in providing primary care.

school buses
Twix / Flickr

  Education officials are notifying Missouri community colleges that the state might reduce reimbursements for the A+ scholarship program.

The A+ program gives high school graduates who meet certain criteria reimbursements for two years of classes at a community college in the state.

Jane Piester, A+ Coordinator for Rock Bridge High School, said although there is currently a shortage of funding, she does not think the program is in danger long term.

Meet The Press / NBC

A visibly-nervous Chuck Todd took over last Sunday morning as the moderator of NBC's flagship political program, "Meet the Press." With the show having previously experienced a drop in ratings many wonder if audiences are over Sunday morning talk shows -- or if Todd has the power to turn things around. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Fox & Friends / Fox News

More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. After TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely. “Fox & Friends” co-hosts responded to the video with comments including “she still married him” and “the message is, when you're in an elevator, there's a camera." Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Travis McMillen

  

    

  More than six months ago, a hotel surveillance camera caught Ray Rice beating his now-wife unconscious in an elevator. For months the NFL was criticized by activists, reporters and columnists for only having suspended him from the first two regular season games. But after TMZ released the surveillance footage on Monday, the Baltimore Ravens cut Rice from the team within hours and the NFL suspended him indefinitely.Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Jonny Williams / Flickr

Of the numerous items Missouri legislators will consider during this veto session, Senate Bill 841 has state health advocates paying attention. The bill's main purpose was to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors. But these good intentions may have led lawmakers astray.

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