Ryan Delaney | KBIA

Ryan Delaney

Originally from Burlington, Vermont, Ryan has worked for Northeast Public Radio in Albany, The Allegheny Front in Pittsburgh, and WAER in Syracuse, where his work was honored by the Syracuse Press Club. His reporting has also aired on New Hampshire Public Radio and Vermont Public Radio.

Ryan has a degree in broadcast journalism and international relations from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and Maxwell School at Syracuse University.

Sarah’s son came home from high school more than a year ago upset about being bullied.

“He came in tears, (saying) ‘they’re calling me a name and someone’s impersonating me,’’ she said in an interview last month.

But the name-calling didn’t happen in the hallway or even in-person. Instead someone created an Instagram account online using a taunting nickname, according to Sarah. That’s when her “nightmare with Instagram” began.

A multi-year effort to shed a Confederate name from one of St. Louis’ top public elementary schools, Kennard Classical Junior Academy, is gaining momentum.

Both parents of Kennard students and alumni of St. Louis Public Schools’ gifted program are lobbying district administrators to pick a new namesake because the current one belongs to a former Confederate States Army soldier.

Missouri education officials released long-awaited school report cards Friday, and the good news is most schools are meeting expectations.

In fact, 97 percent of public schools scored in the fully accredited range, including Kansas City, Hickman Mills and Riverview Gardens — all districts trying to regain accreditation.

At the same time, fewer than half of public school students in Missouri passed the new, more rigorous math and English tests they took last spring.

One of the first major policy issues introduced in the Missouri General Assembly every year is K-12 education funding, which takes up a fifth of the state budget.

One of the first major policy issues introduced in the Missouri General Assembly every year is K-12 education funding, which takes up a fifth of the state budget.

With a new governor and leadership in both chambers, expect a different debate about education than recent years, but over some perennial issues.

Updated 5:25 p.m. with additional information on the school's financial situation —

St. Louis College Prep has lost tens of thousands of dollars in state funding amidst an investigation into whether the charter school's founder over-reported attendance records.

The Missouri State Auditor’s office accepted a request Jan. 11 from Education Commissioner Margie Vandeven to review St. Louis College Prep’s finances. Charter schools are public schools that receive state and federal funding but operate independently from traditional school districts.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson talked a lot about expanding early childhood education opportunities in the weeks leading up to his first State of the State address and budget as governor.

Missouri’s education oversight board wants to better understand why one in seven public-school teachers in the state quit every school year.

The State Board of Education discussed teacher pay and retention at its January meeting Tuesday. It was the first gathering for education commissioner Margie Vandeven since being removed from the post by then-Gov. Eric Greitens in December 2017 and then hired back last year.

Updated with comment from the school district and plaintiff — The Ferguson-Florissant Board of Education has to switch to a weighted voting system for its April elections, as ordered by a federal judge more than two years ago.

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday declined to hear the appeal by the Ferguson-Florissant School District, codifying a lower court ruling and bringing an end to a lawsuit first brought by the ACLU and NAACP in 2014.

It’s Margie Vandeven’s first day at the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, but she shouldn’t need any help finding her office. That’s because Vandeven is returning as the state’s top schools chief just over a year after her unpopular removal from that same job.

Vandeven was well-liked in the public education world and by the members of the state school board that then-Gov. Eric Greitens wasn't able to replace. After her removal Dec. 1, 2017, Greitens’ school board picks failed to install a replacement before running into opposition from the state Senate, leaving the opportunity for the board to bring Vandeven back.

A teacher at Orchard Farm Middle School started a new class this semester with one assignment: organize a fundraiser for a nonprofit of the students’ choice and follow through.

Chris Liesmann teaches Spanish in the eastern St. Charles school system. He decided to start an elective course on philanthropy. He called the class Change Makers.

It's the time of year when schoolchildren and, let's be honest, sometimes their parents, face a big decision: what gift to give their teacher for the holidays. There's the old standby, an apple on the desk. Gift cards are also convenient; and homemade cookies can earn bonus points. But many students get far more creative.

Mizzou’s newest athletes won’t be bruising each other in the football stadium. Instead, they’ll spend hours in front of the screen tapping furiously on keypads.

The University of Missouri-Columbia is joining a growing number of colleges and universities adding competitive video gaming — commonly called esports — to its roster of varsity sports. Mizzou announced last week it will form an esports program beginning in fall 2019.

Lloyd Gaines never studied at the University of Missouri Law School. Still, his efforts to get in as a black student in the 1930s had a major impact on school segregation laws and African-American attorneys in Missouri.

A U.S. Supreme Court decision handed down Dec. 12, 1938, said the law school either had to accept Gaines’ application or create an equal but separate option. It was not the outcome Gaines and the NAACP had hoped for, but the lawsuit put a crack in the “separate but equal” doctrine established by the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson case.

Virtual schooling is coming to public K-12 education in Missouri next month.

While districts expect high school students to be the first to enroll, the program allows for students as young as first grade to take classes online.

A Catholic order has released the names of dozens of priests once accused of sexual abuse, including 17 who worked in St. Louis-area parochial schools and parishes.

Twelve priests on the list worked at St. Louis University High School and several others taught at other St. Louis-area parochial schools.

All were found to have "credible allegations" of sexual abuse made against them, according to the Central and Southern Province and the Western Province of Jesuits.

When the Ferguson-Florissant Board of Education weighed a plan to redraw boundaries and consolidate the district’s footprint this fall, residents in Berkeley heard a familiar threat in the undertow: a further washing away of their community identity and erosion of the city’s population.

Ferguson-Florissant School District plans to close two elementary schools — one of which is in Berkeley — and transform the high school Berkeley teenagers attend into a selective magnet school.

Crumbling sidewalks, peeling ceilings and outdated classrooms are some of the challenges facing Missouri’s public colleges and universities.

A campus review by the Missouri Department of Higher Education tallied up a $1.4 billion deferred maintenance backlog across the state’s two- and four-year campuses. This is the first review of its type in a decade.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. with comments from Vandeven — Margie Vandeven will return as Missouri’s top education official a year after her unpopular firing by then-Gov. Eric Greitens.

The State Board of Education announced its selection of Vandeven as state education commissioner Tuesday. She ran the state’s Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, or DESE, for three years before she was ousted.

St. Louis shut down for a snow day Thursday but that just meant Forest Park’s Art Hill was bustling.

Hundreds of sledders bundled up and hurdled down the iconic hill for a snow day tradition, using anything to make it down, from lunch trays to snowboards, to a kayak.

“You can’t pass this up,” said Matt Strucker, who skipped work to sled for the morning with his wife, Becky, a teacher who had the day off.

A group of middle-aged adults is back in school this fall. This time, though, they’re at the front of the classroom learning how to be teachers.

St. Louis Teacher Residency, launched over the summer, is recruiting adults to change careers to work in education, hoping their life experience and maturity will lead to less burnout and longer tenures among urban educators.

Updated at 7 p.m. with additional details and comments — St. Louis University is implementing more cost-cutting measures as fiscal problems persist, even after trimming its workforce last year.

The private, Catholic university is facing a double blow of fewer students and less revenue from its doctors, resulting in a projected $30 million deficit by 2023.

University President Fred Pestello outlined the monetary challenge in an email to faculty and staff Monday afternoon, and additional details were shared with employees during a Faculty Senate meeting today.

St. Louis school board member Bill Haas doesn't think the board is ready to retake control of the district from the state.

Haas, who is seeking re-election to the board, said several members are "sheep," doing the teachers' union bidding.

Applications for the St. Louis school desegregation program are decreasing, yet there’s still more demand than open slots.

At its height in the early 1990s, the program that started in 1982 as the result of lawsuit bused more than 13,000 black St. Louis students to predominantly white schools in St. Louis County. A smaller number of white students came into the city to attend St. Louis Public magnet schools.

The Voluntary Interdistrict Choice Corporation — or as it’s more commonly know, VICC — has been winding down since a settlement in 1999, but it’s lived on through extensions.

Elections for the St. Louis Board of Education have been largely meaningless over the last decade.

A special administrative board has run St. Louis Public Schools since 2007, leaving the seven-member elected board with almost no power.

That’s about to change.

The Missouri State Board of Education plans to interview four people for the state’s next education commissioner, a position that’s been empty nearly a year.

The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has been run by an interim commissioner since last December when former Gov. Eric Greitens orchestrated the firing of then-Commissioner Margie Vandeven by stacking the school board with loyalists.

Enrollment increased so much this summer at Edgar Road Elementary in Webster Groves, the school had to add a second temporary classroom behind the school to accommodate all the new students. A third will probably have to be added next summer.

Because of a growing student population, portable temporary classrooms have been added to two other Webster Groves elementary schools as well. Webster Groves has 4,435 students in kindergarten through 12th grade, about 200 more than in 2010. The district expects to enroll another 226 elementary students by 2022.

Missouri House Speaker Todd Richardson will leave the Statehouse to oversee management of the state’s low-income health-insurance program.

Gov. Mike Parson on Monday appointed Richardson, 41, director of MO HealthNet. The appointment will take effect Nov. 1, about two months before Richardson's term in the House was to end.

That fear of waiting outside the principal’s office to be punished after a disagreement between students is being replaced, in part, by a less intimidating environment at two Pattonville elementary schools.

Now, when students are having trouble getting along, they can gather around a table in the guidance counselor’s office with fellow students who have been trained as peer mediators.

A recent graduate of Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville is suing the school over the way it handled her allegation that another student sexually assaulted her.

In a federal lawsuit filed Tuesday, Bailey Reed claims the university mismanaged the investigation, intimidated her and obstructed her access to a quality education. SIUE has not filed a response to the lawsuit.

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