Travis McMillen | KBIA

Travis McMillen

Video Producer

TRAVIS McMILLEN is the video producer for the Futures Lab, located on the lower level of the Reynolds Journalism Institute. As video producer, McMillen directs and produces regular and occasional programming from RJI’s own production studio, including KBIA-FM’s Views of the News, Global Journalist and Radio Friends with Paul Pepper. He is a Columbia native who started working at KOMU-TV, the University of Missouri’s NBC affiliate, at the age of 16. At 18 McMillen became the audio operator for Pepper and Friends, a community variety and talk show that aired on KOMU for 27 years. It was a position he held for almost 10 years. Aside from audio, McMillen’s duties on the show included field segment videographer and editor and, from 2001-2007, primary fill-in director. McMillen also directed KOMU’s daily two-hour morning newscast from 2001-2008. He is married to Jennifer, whom he met at KOMU. She currently produces the CW News at Nine for the station. They have three boys.

Ways to Connect

Reward or redirect? DR. MAR DOERING, DVM, All Paws Medical and Behavioral Center shares tips on how to handle your pet's constant need for attention. March 26, 2019

Sit back, relax and experience the Missouri Symphony's popular 'Hot Summer Nights' series this June and July! Eighteen concerts over five weeks in locations throughout mid-Missouri - are you ready?! Guest: KIRK TREVOR  March 25, 2019

"By and large, I would say, as a human being and as a society, we need to make the conscious effort to get out there and spend more time exploring nature - for our health, for our body, for our mind." -- DR. ANAND CHOCKALINGAM, MD, Cardiologist, MU Health Care. March 22, 2019

"You have to have a resurrection, Paul." -- ROB CROUSE when asked why Capital City Productions is bringing Vertigo Flying Service on board for their take on Andrew Lloyd Webber's 'Jesus Christ Superstar'. Curtain goes up March 28! Also, this Saturday is the 67th annual Columbia Kiwanis Club Pancake Day fundraiser! Guests RICK McGUIRE and JENNIFER ROBERTS say each ticket sold supports programs that benefit children in Columbia. (5:07) March 21, 2019

What do you do with an old fire extinguisher? How about a ragged, old tarp? BARBARA BUFFALOE answers those questions and more on today's show! (You could also ask the Office of Sustainability's 'Waste Wizard', but that's not near as much fun.) March 20, 2019

"I think if people would go on the website, American or United, and look at those flight prices - even without the drive, even without the parking - I think the ticket prices have really come down. It's really exciting to see." -- MIKE PARKS on one of the benefits of flying out of Columbia instead of St. Louis or Kansas City. What's your favorite part of flying COU? March 19, 2019

As usual, our conversation with MEL ZELENAK covers a wide range of topics for the smart consumer, and today is no different. On the docket: the 'Silver Sneakers' program, auto-paying monthly bills, investing in low-cost index funds and more! March 18, 2019

Despite the long list of at-risk factors to consider, DR. ERIK GROSSMANN, MD, MU Health Care, says that most people who get colon cancer have none of them, which is why it's important for everyone to get screened. Also, MARILYN McLEOD invites everyone to two events at the Columbia Public Library. The first is a 'Lunch and Learn' with keynote speaker Brianna Lennon, and the other is a candidate forum with Columbia's mayoral candidates and candidates for school board. (3:40) March 15, 2019

The annual Youth Art Fiber Exhibit, sponsored by Columbia Weavers and Spinners' Guild, is just six days away! See your child's fiber art project hang in the gallery at the Boone County History & Culture Center alongside fellow fans of fiber for ten days, March 20-30. Guest: REBECCA BERGFIELD | Also, ERIN BROWN invites everyone to the 3rd annual CoMo Wellness Conference, happening this May. As with years past, you're sure to gain a wealth of health-related knowledge from industry leaders and practitioners! (4:00) March 14, 2019

Gayle King’s interview with R. Kelly has been described as a master class for journalists. This week, an analysis of her questions, her body language, and the discussion the conversation created. Also, Facebook’s pivot to privacy, an Arkansas newspaper publisher sues over anti-BDS pledge, and the internet’s happiest day. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

How do you get a teenager who thinks they're invincible and they know it all to listen to you when you say drugs and alcohol are bad? JOY SWEENEY and Council for Drug Free Youth has the answer: a program called 'Teen Baseline'. March 12, 2019

One stone, one tree and five cast members make up MU Theatre Department's production of Samuel Beckett's classic 'Waiting for Godot'. See it this weekend only in Studio 4, which is inside McKee Gymnasium on the MU campus. Guest: Dr. SUSAN BURGOYNE  March 11, 2019

Alzheimer's Association volunteer LOIS LONG says that the list of those affected by dementia is "growing exponentially" every year. She adds that early detection is key, and if diagnosed, to take the available medication right away to slow the disease down. Lois also talks about the ways in which caregivers can monitor patients who like to wander from home. March 8, 2019

To say this winter has been a challenge is a bit of an understatement. Nobody knows that better than ADAM SAUNDERS, who says the cold weather - and therefore the cold ground - has delayed the grand opening of Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture's new Agriculture Park. And speaking of the winter weather, NICK FOSTER tells us about Voluntary Action Center's efforts to shelter those without during the extreme cold, and to help those in need of rent assistance. (3:55) March 7, 2019

The screening of ‘The Commons’ during the True/False Film Fest led to a lot of off-screen action as several students featured in the film challenged the filmmakers’ process. Was their work journalism? Or something else? Also, reaction to Leaving Neverland, reporting on a known hoax and why Google Canada is banning political advertising ahead of a federal election in that country.

From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

'Magic Arts' is the theme of the next Second Saturday for Kids at Orr Street Studios in Columbia! CATHERINE PARKE says kids ages 5-15 are invited to come and participate and learn from featured artist Dennis Murphy! Also, JENNIFER SNAWDER, RN, challenges us to change something about our eating habits that perhaps has been bothering us for awhile - after all, March is National Nutrition Month! (3:10) March 6, 2019

Written in 2011, 'Hello! My Baby' takes its audience back to the early 20th century when class-struggles ruled, especially when it comes to fulfilling one's dream. Student actors TRAMONTE MILLER and MORGAN MILLER tell us about Hickman High School's adaptation of this classic dilemma that's set to some recognizable music. Also, if you're a fan of KBIA, general manager MIKE DUNN says now is the time to pledge your support! (3:52) March 5, 2019

Self-driving cars is becoming a reality, and while it may sound like a cool idea, PROF. SCOTT CHRISTIANSON points out a not-so-obvious morality dilemma when it comes to programming machines that are designed to make decisions that a human normally would, saying "hopefully the car will be able to avoid the accident, but there may be situations where it may not be able to, so how do we want those cars programmed?" In other words, who loses? March 4, 2019

The Salvation Army's need for volunteers is year-round! LORI BENSON says "we're always famous for ringing the bells at Christmastime, and then people kinda stop and don't think past that." Additional guest: CARMON CAMP | Also, CB CHASTAIN from MU's Veterinary Health Center tells us about a pet food recall going on now! (3:49) March 1, 2019

Musicians THOM HOWARD and KATIE SMYTH perform 'Blackbird' and 'Tico Tico' on guitar and flute. Find out more about the duo at: https://howardandsmyth.com February 28, 2019

Journalists in Australia covered the sex abuse trial of Cardinal George Pell for months, not sharing word of his December conviction until this week. Why the gag order? And, why are more than 100 journalists facing potential jail time for contempt or their work? Also, updates in the cases of Jussie Smollett, R. Kelly and the Alabama publisher who wrote an editorial calling for the Ku Klux Klan to resume night rides and lynchings. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Our ongoing series of eco-friendly floor covering ideas continues with this segment about the benefits of wool. Carpet One Floor and Home's SCOTT BRADLEY says that wool, among other things, can be the solution for those who suffer from allergies but still want wall-to-wall carpeting. Also, MU grad student CHRISTOPHER PAOLLELA tells us about his research into human trafficking throughout the Middle Ages, and how not much has changed between then and now. (4:19) February 27, 2019

February is American Heart Month, and DR. BRIAN BOSTICK, MU Health Care, says if your family has a history of heart disease, it's important that you get screened - and even if your family is in the clear, it's important that you be aware of the risks so that history doesn't begin with you. Also, (3:34) local photographer ANASTASIA POTTINGER takes us beyond the pages of her new book, '100: What Time Creates', which features intimate photos of centenarians. What's the secret to making it to such an advanced age? Anastasia says she learned it's "staying plump." February 26, 2019

2019 is well underway, but that doesn't mean you still can't set a few financial goals, including - and yes, this pays off, literally - exercising regularly! That's just one of three resolutions shared by consumer expert MEL ZELENAK in this interview that also touches on investing in index funds. February 25, 2019

Actors KAYLEE CORNELL and HAILEY LENTZ tell us about Christian Fellowship School's production of 'We Found Love and An Exquisite Set of Porcelain Figurines Aboard the SS Farndale Avenue'. According to Hailey, "everything goes wrong" with the play within the play; "it's very amusing." Also, (3:32) KATE GRAY says the Montminy Art Gallery's 2019 calendar is set. Up first is Gladys Swan's 'The Map of the Invisible: Playing with Color & Movement'. Experience this "joyous show" for yourself now through March 31st at the Boone County History and Culture Center. February 22, 2019

Sure, it's still February, but it's never too soon to start planning for which of the Columbia Art League's many summer camp options your child should attend. Maybe try them all! Guest: LOUISE SARVER | Also, WALLY PFEFFER and SCOTT JOFFE invite everyone to come watch basketball, win prizes and eat pizza at the Mizzou Alumni Association's Founder's Day luncheon this Saturday in Columbia. RSVP encouraged. (4:18) February 21, 2019

An Alabama #newspaper publisher ran an editorial suggesting the best way to stop Washington politicians from raising taxes is for the Ku Klux Klan to ‘ride again,’ suggesting lynching as a solution. He’s been given a chance to walk those statements back, and only doubled down on them. Also, rapid developments in the investigation into attack claims by ‘Empire’ star Jussie Smollett, how a governor’s State of the State address turned into a story about a dress and Sinclair Broadcast Group’s new Marquee Network. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

"So somebody says, John, why use the Community Foundation instead of, open up a donor-advised fund with Vanguard or Schwab or charitable. And one of the main reasons is, number one, you get personal service here locally; but secondly, any fees that are assessed on that kind of work is plowed right back into the community for more good non-profit work." -- John Baker, Executive Director of Community Foundation of Central Missouri   February 20, 2019

'The Every 28 Hours Plays' gets its name and its theme from the (contested) statistic that every 28 hours, a black person is killed by the police or vigilante. Director CLAIRE SYLER says it's a somber theme with an important message, and it's running this weekend only at the Rhynsburger Theatre on the MU campus. Also, JEFF CHINN stops by to remind us that tax season is here! If you need help, AARP Foundation Tax-Aide is providing its services free of charge now through April 15 - no reservations needed! (4:53) February 19, 2019

Folk musicians CATHY BARTON and DAVE PARA perform "The Hymn Song" on guitar and autoharp at [2:00]. February 18, 2019

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