All Things Considered | KBIA

All Things Considered

Weekdays 3:00pm-6:00pm, Weekend at 4pm
  • Hosted by Melissa Block, Michele Norris, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by almost 13 million* people on nearly 700 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. 

A one-hour edition of the program runs on Saturday and Sunday.

The posts below are some of the highlights from All Things ConsideredVisit the program page on NPR to see a full list of stories.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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New documents out tonight provide new details about what Michael Cohen, the president's former attorney, told Congress behind closed doors this March. Cohen already admitted publicly that he misled Congress about the timing of a Trump Tower project in Moscow. He is currently in federal prison serving a three-year sentence. Tonight's revelations have to do with who Cohen says told him to lie and why.

NPR's Tim Mak joins us now from Capitol Hill with details. Hey, Tim.

TIM MAK, BYLINE: Hey there.

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We go now to Ukraine, which swore in a new president today, a president who is wasting no time putting his stamp on how the country's run.

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A 40-year-old California law requiring public school teachers on extended sick leave to pay for their own substitute teachers is under scrutiny by some state lawmakers after NPR member station KQED reported on the practice.

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Now we're going to have a conversation that few of us want to have but most of us eventually will have to have. It's about caring for an aging relative who is in decline. Author Lorene Cary has been there, and she's written about it beautifully, honestly and hilariously in her new memoir "Ladysitting: My Year With Nana At The End Of Her Century." And Lorene Cary's with us now on the line from Philadelphia.

Lorene, thanks so much for talking to us.

LORENE CARY: Thank you.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we're going to have a conversation that few of us want to have but most of us eventually will have to have. It's about caring for an aging relative who is in decline. Author Lorene Cary has been there, and she's written about it beautifully, honestly and hilariously in her new memoir "Ladysitting: My Year With Nana At The End Of Her Century." And Lorene Cary's with us now on the line from Philadelphia.

Lorene, thanks so much for talking to us.

LORENE CARY: Thank you.

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Here's a puzzle: Do the qualities that allow a man to block 300lb bodies every day have anything to do with the qualities that allow the same person to solve three-body problems late into the night? Stumped? John Urschel can solve that puzzle for you.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

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Copyright 2019 Houston Public Media News 88.7. To see more, visit Houston Public Media News 88.7.

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To hear more about the White House plan, we turn now to White House spokesperson Adam Kennedy. Welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

ADAM KENNEDY: Thank you for having me on.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Now let's bring in NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson, who is also watching the president's immigration speech and listening to that conversation just then with Adam Kennedy. Hi, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi, Ari.

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Copyright 2019 WGVU News. To see more, visit WGVU News.

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Officials in Grand Rapids, Mich., want to ban what they call racially biased 911 calls. The callers could face fines of up to $500. Michelle Jokisch Polo of member station WGVU reports.

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