Intersection | KBIA

Intersection

Each week, our host Janet Saidi sits down with community members to discuss issues concerning mid-Missourians. From politics, to local art to social issues, anything that generates good conversations and affects our community is on the table.

To hear the conversations, simply tune in to KBIA 91.3 FM on Mondays between 6:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m. You can hear the show on the radio or through the live stream on kbia.org. If you miss an episode, you can always catch up with the conversations here, or subscribe to our show through iTunes or any podcast app.

Don't forget to connect with us on Facebook or Twitter and tell us what local issues matter to you. 

See the show archives on the Intersection website.

Janet Saidi / KBIA

Nearly 29 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, citizens, organizations, companies and campuses are still working on providing access and accommodations for those who need it to engage with and experience the world - its streets, its buildings, its concerts, classrooms, and even its radio programs.

Janet Saidi / KBIA

This week, Intersection sits down with Alex George, a Columbia author, owner of Skylark Bookshop and founder of the Unbound Book Festival, which comes to Columbia this weekend.

Now in its fourth year, the festival has brought literary celebrities - like Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith and this year's keynote speaker George Sanders - as well as up-and-coming literary voices to mid-Missouri. 

Travis McMillen | Janet Saidi / RJI | KBIA

Tuesday is election day and voters across mid-Missouri are deciding on school board, mayoral and city council races. One of the most important races on the Boone County ballot is the Columbia mayoral race, with two experienced politicans vying for the job.

Mayor Brian Treece  is seeking a second term and has served as Columbia's mayor since 2016. Before his election as mayor Treece worked on historic preservation efforts in the city and chaired the Downtown Leadership Council.

Seth Bodine, Sidney Steele, Kassidy Arena / KBIA

This week on Intersection: Three candidates in Columbia are running for two seats open on the Columbia Public School’s Board of Education ... and voters will decide between the three candidates in the municipal election April 2nd.


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

In this excerpt from KBIA’s Intersection, Melanie Hickcox and Monica Palmer with Feeding Missouri, a coalition of Missouri food banks, discuss the stereotypes and stigmas surrounding food insecurity.

They spoke to KBIA for Missouri Health Talks.

Molly Dove / KBIA

Hunger affects about 900,000 people in Missouri, according to Feeding America. And it can be found in rural areas or in urban areas, and even on college campuses, throughout the state. 

Though some organizations and food banks, like the Food Bank of Central and Northeast Missouri, are using creative ways to combat the issue of food insecurity, researchers are still trying to find a way to reduce hunger. 

On this episode of Intersection, we talk about what it means to be food insecure, how where you live can affect it and the stigmas that come with hunger. 

File photo / True False Film Festival

This week on Intersection, we'll look back on the weekend in Columbia that was the annual inspiration overload known as the True False Film Festival.

In this 16th year of the fest, the streets were taken over by art, film, conversation, confrontation, and inspiration. And KBIA was there, capturing some of the sights, sounds and conversations.

In this edition:

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

The 2019 True False Film Fest is here. And this week on Intersection, we're tossing the mic to the True False podcast team.

Podcast host Allison Coffelt sat down with three programmers behind the festival to get the highlights and themes emerging from this year's lineup. 

Featured guests: True False Programmers Abby Sun, Amir George and Chris Boeckmann, with True False Podcast host Allison Coffelt

Check out the True False podcast from the True False team and KBIA.

Janet Saidi / KBIA

In her book "Gateway to Equality: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis," MU Professor Keona Ervin delves into the stories and the frontline activism of working-class black women in her native city of St. Louis. 

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media and KBIA

Drought, storms, extreme weather conditions, the rise of sea levels, the loss of ecosystems, and dire predictions: If you follow the news, you know that when it comes to the state of the planet, it's not a pretty picture. And President Trump's 2017 decision to pull the United States out of the Paris Climate Agreement has added to the concerns.

But what does all this mean for Columbia, Missouri? 

Janet Saidi / KBIA

This week Intersection features a chat with Columbia Mayor Brian Treece about the future of Columbia.

Mayor Treece was elected in 2016, and is currently seeking a second term. He's facing a challenge from long-time Missouri politician Chris Kelly. Voters get to decide on that in April, and we’ll have future conversations focused on that race. 

Meiying Wu / KBIA

Community Policing has been an important issue in Columbia recently, driving discussions around fair and equitable policing and sparking controversy over its handling by Columbia's former city manager and police chief.

On Intersection, a roundtable of stakeholders came together to discuss the philosophy of community policing, how it influenced the tenure - and departure - of former Columbia Police Chief Ken Burton, and how the city of Columbia can move forward with fair and effective policing strategies.

Guests on this episode of Intersection include:

Meiying Wu / KBIA

On this edition of Intersection, three local analysts discuss recent dramatic changes in Columbia, including the departures of the city's police chief, its city manager, and the elimination of the position of deputy city manager.

We explore the factors influencing these changes, and what it all means for the community as we move forward in a new year and in the runup to April's municipal elections.

Today on Intersection, we’re sharing interviews with local authors coming to the Unbound Book Festival this weekend, and also exploring concerns about diversity and expression at the festival. Unbound is a three-day event that brings authors from all over the world to Columbia to talk and share insight on their work. The event runs from April 19 to the 21, and will be held in venues across Columbia, including The Missouri Theatre and Stephens College. This year's headline speaker is author Zadie Smith.

As we put together this show, we learned of people voicing concerns over diversity and inclusion at the Unbound Book Festival, particularly on several panels with all white participants. 

Ibtisam Barakat, a Palestinian-American author, posted a statement to Facebook about a week ago saying she was encouraged by these discussions to reveal racism experienced while participating in an Unbound panel last year. Barakat talked with producer Abby Ivory-Ganja about her experience. Sara Shahriari spoke with festival organizer Alex George about what will change for the festival going forward.  


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

This week on Intersection, we bring you a special from Missouri Health Talks. Health reporter Rebecca Smith spoke with Jennifer Carter Dochler, the Public Policy Director for the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence (MCADSV) and one of the facilitators of the MO-SART, or Missouri Sexual Assault Response Team.

Creative Commons

The classic concept of bullying is a boy on the playground scaring other kids into giving up their lunch money. But that's far from how much bullying unfolds. Today on Intersection we explore what bullying, and efforts to stop it, look like in Missouri. We hear about revenge porn, online bullying and harassment, and prevention programs at local schools.

Editor’s note: On this episode, we discuss topics including suicide. This may not be suitable for all listeners.   

True False logo
File Photo / KBIA

Today, we're looking back at a few popular films from the True/False film festival. We spoke with six filmmakers about the process behind their films and what they hope audiences gain from their work. 

The films cover a range of topics, from the father-son relationship within a radical jihadist group, the nature-nurture debate and the loss of Singapore's first independent film. 

Our producers talked with the directors of Primas, Shirkers, Black Mother, Antonio e Catrina, Three Identical Strangers and Of Fathers and Sons. 


KBIA

Last week Missouri Governor Eric Greitens was indicted by a grand jury and charged with felony invasion of privacy. His trial is scheduled to begin May 14.

But what is a grand jury, an indictment or a felony? And for that matter, what is invasion of privacy?


T/F Film Festival

 Today, we’re talking with four True/False filmmakers about the inspiration behind their documentaries and what they hope audiences learn from their films. The documentaries cover a range of topics including aging, deportation and policing.

 

The True/False fest starts Thursday, March 1 and ends Sunday, March 4. Over the course of four days, 45 films will be shown. You can find a complete list of films on the T/F website.

 


Nathan Lawrence/KBIA

Today on Intersection, we're exploring some of the fascinating cultural events in Columbia this month. We hear about journalism meeting civil rights history and theater in The Green Duck Lounge, the major international photography competition POYi, and get some insider views on True/False films. 

 


Netflix

This week on Intersection, we bring you an episode of the True/False Podcast, which is a collaboration between the True/False Film Fest and KBIA. The podcast showcases in-depth conversations with documentary film directors, and today we hear from director Kitty Green. Her documentary, "Casting JonBenét," was shown at last year’s True/False Film Festival and is now streaming on Netflix.


photo of Junot Diaz
Nina Subin

This week on Intersection, we bring you excerpts from author Junot Díaz's Jan. 22 talk at MU.

Díaz won the 2008 Pulitzer prize for his first novel, "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.” He received a MacArthur 'Genius' Fellowship and co-founded the Voices of Our National Arts Foundation, which holds workshops for writers of color. He is a professor of writing at MIT.

Díaz immigrated from the Dominican Republic to the United State when he was six. In his literary work and activism, he tackles issues including immigration, assimilation and oppression.

 

His speech was part of the MU Celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. event. During the talk, Díaz spoke about white supremacy, the role of artists and the lasting effects of slavery.

 


Today, we're talking with three mid-Missouri authors - Mary Collins Barile, David Crespy and Brian Katcher. They've written plays, books on local folklore and young adult novels.


A photo of Dr. Berkley Hudson, Dr. Stephanie Shonekan, and Stephanie Hernandez Rivera
University of Missouri

It’s been more than two years since the protests at the University of Missouri. In 2015, the university was at the center of a national conversation on race relations and student activism.

Today, the campus has undergone a number of changes, including the hiring of a new Chancellor and UM System President, and a new division of diversity, inclusion, and equity.

This week on Intersection we bring you a special on homelessness from Missouri Health Talks. Health reporter Rebecca Smith spoke with Jennifer Carter Dochler, the Public Policy Director for the Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence and the Vice Chair of the Governor’s Committee to End Homelessness.

Smith was also joined by Teresa and Frankie Graham, the resident manager and a longtime volunteer at Harvest House – a local homeless shelter in Boonville.

They spoke about the state of homelessness in Missouri, how homelessness looks the same and different in rural and urban areas, what is being done to combat the problem and what individuals can do to help.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

Kristofor Husted/KBIA

Today, we’re bringing you United and Divided, a series of stories on bridging the urban-rural divide. It's reported by Harvest Public Media.

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election one thing is clear: rural America and urban America see things differently. In this series of profiles, Harvest Public Media reporters introduce us to our fellow Americans and examine the issues that they hold dear. We re-discover the ties that bind us and learn more about the lines that divide us. And through these voices, we come to know Americans just a little bit better.

Reporters from Missouri, Colorado, Iowa and Nebraska explore topics causing rift in the country, and how those differences define the future. They looked at schools, religion, immigration and trade policy. 


Courtesy Anton Treuer and Bemidji State University

November is Native American Heritage Month. This week author and professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University Anton Treuer talks with host Sara Shahriari. MU professor of digital storytelling and citizen of Cherokee Nation Joseph Erb joins in the wide-ranging conversation on language's role in maintaining a culture, Truer's book Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask, and the damage done by some mascots that mimic Native Americans. 


Sara Shahriari/KBIA

This week on intersection we are joined by Dr. Rebecca Johnson. She is the Millsap Professor of Gerontological Nursing and Public Policy Professor at the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing. She's also a professor and serves as the director of the Research Center for Human Animal Interaction in the MU College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Johnson researches how people and pets interact, including the beneficial effects animals can have on people and the science behind it all.


Beatriz Costa-Lima / KBIA

Welcome Home is a transitional emergency and service center for veterans. The organization has been operating in Columbia for more than 25 years, and recently expanded. The mission? To reduce veteran homelessness by helping people gain housing, services and skills to form stable lives. 

Intersection's Sara Shahriari sat down with Timothy Rich, the executive director of Welcome Home, to learn about the organization and its new facilities.


Photo courtesy of T.J. Thomson

This week on Intersection we are joined by Jim Obergefell , who was the plaintiff in the landmark Supreme Court case that legalized same-sex marriage. Obergefell visited the University of Missouri earlier this month to present a lecture called “Love Wins” for a symposium on the Science of Love. Timothy Blair also joined the conversation. Blair is an alumnus of the Missouri School of Journalism, and in 2015 he donated $1 million to create the Timothy D. Blair Fund for LGBT Coverage in Journalism. 

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