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Social media influencers have enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. From an industry that was virtually non-existent a decade ago, companies are projected to pay individuals $10 billion globally in 2020 to laud their products in social media posts.

This booming industry has led to a number of different concerns for regulators and for advertisers. The added scrutiny led the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to issue new guidelines for influencers in November.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the rise of the social media influencer industry and how it’s changing advertising.


YouTube says it's banning hateful and extremist speech from neo-Nazis, white supremacists and terrorists.  But that's a tough task.  And in the past few days, the social media giant has also taken down videos -- at least temporarily -- from people fighting hate speech by quoting some of the perpetrators.  Is the solution to bad speech really less speech? 

Three very different stories illustrate the common -- and deepening -- fault line that news, sports, entertainment media and higher education are trying desperately to straddle.   Every word, every video clip, every invited speaker, every programming decision is viewed through the hyper-partisan lens of pro-Trump and anti-Trump activists.  On this week's episode of Views of the News we discuss Sean Spicer, Chelsea Manning and ESPN's Jemele Hill.  Plus a look at the new Ken Burns documentary on the Vietnam War.  

Inviting Spicer to the Emmys

Newscast for April 6, 2012

Apr 6, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • House endorses teacher tenure compromise
  • Ruling could doom payday loan ballot initiative
  • Missouri House approves advertising on school buses