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ICIJ

Marina Walker Guevara has managed two massive global investigations for the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.

Both the 'Panama Papers' and 'Paradise Papers' investigations of offshore tax havens and money laundering involved a global network of dozens of journalists working in six continents.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, Guevara speaks with host Kathy Kiely about the leaks that revealed how some of the world's most wealthy and powerful people hid money offshore, and how ICIJ meticulously combed through millions of documents to make sense of it all.


AP Photo

Local and regional newspapers have dwindled all across the U.S. as print advertising revenues have shrunk.

But the U.S. isn't alone - there is a local news crisis all around the globe. In the second part of our series on the decline in local news with our partners at the Index on Censorship, a look at the problem in India, Poland and Argentina.

In these countries, traditional local news outlets face a host of problems: from populist governments to WhatsApp groups.


Christine Blasey Ford was 100 percent certain Judge Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school. Kavanaugh was 100 percent certain he didn’t.

But one figure that jumped out during Kavanaugh's recent U.S. Supreme Court confirmation hearings was this: 23 percent. That’s the percentage of women in the U.S. Senate, the body that voted to narrowly confirm him. Indeed the U.S. ranks 103rd in the world in the share of women in national legislatures – behind countries like Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and Iraq.

One major reason why is that more than 60 countries have passed quota laws for female candidates in the past 30 years. In many others nations, political parties have adopted voluntary quotas for women.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at gender quotas in international politics and whether they've worked as intended.


Gregorio Borgia / AP

Next week is an historic one for Pope Francis. He’ll make his first trip to the United States since becoming pope in March 2013. He’ll visit President Obama in Washington D.C., stop by a high school in a poor section of New York, and attend a Catholic families conference in Philadelphia.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the effect of his papacy inside and outside the Roman Catholic church.

Matilde Campodonico / AP

This summer, the United States Supreme Court will make a decision on whether to legalize same-sex marriage. But some countries in Latin America have already done that, with Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay being three that have made gay marriage legal. In this edition of Global Journalist, we look at gay rights in the region, and how some countries are actually going backwards in terms of gay rights.

This week's guests: