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Trump's tax plan

Nov 18, 2016
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Lizzie O'Leary and Hayley Hershman

While a lot of policy decisions are up in the air under the new Trump administration, there are a few things we know. The Washington Post's Jim Tankersley sat down to discuss what we can expect from president-elect Trump's tax plan. He says that the tax plan is, "far and away, no matter who scores it, the most expensive plan for the federal budget every proposed by a president elect."

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Gigi Douban

Alabama is moving ahead with a new version of Medicaid. But it’s hit some big financial bumps, and the plan has been delayed a year.

The question was how to overcome a big budget shortfall. The answer, state lawmakers agreed, was to take money from the settlement fund that BP agreed to pay the state after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. 

In Alabama, just over one in four residents — 1.2 million people — are on Medicaid. But the state’s insurance program for the poor isn’t in the clear.

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Donna Tam

Update, 2:17 p.m. PT: The New York Attorney General announced that the parties reached a settlement of $25 million.

Donald Trump may settle a lawsuit involving fraud allegations against Trump University, The Wall Street Journal reported today.

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Mitchell Hartman

We’re coming up on the holiday shopping season. And you can be sure retail and delivery companies know that. They’re trying to hire temporary seasonal workers. Target, UPS, Amazon, the list goes on — they’re all competing to staff their sales counters and get orders out the door — and it’s tough because unemployment’s even lower than it was last year. Plus, there’s a new labor competitor on the block — the gig economy. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

Thought you were in-network? Surprise!

Nov 18, 2016
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D Gorenstein

There’s a one-in-five chance people with commercial insurance who show up at an in-network emergency room will end up getting cared for by an out-of-network doctor. That’s according to new research in the New England Journal of Medicine released this week. That means surprise medical bills for some consumers. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Minimum wage is on the rise in certain states

Nov 18, 2016
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Mark Garrison

The election results show how divided the country is, but there’s an important economic issue where there’s some real agreement. On Election Day, people in four states voted to jack up the minimum wage.

Arizona, Colorado, Maine and Washington state will hike wages gradually, hitting $12 per hour by the year 2020, and $13.50 in Washington. The pay raises on the ballot all won by wide margins. Low-income workers in these states will earn much more than the current federal minimum of $7.25 an hour, the ceiling for 2.6 million workers.

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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about Volkswagen's decision to cut 30,000 jobs in the aftermath of its emissions cheating scandal; why some E.R. visits are costing patients much more than they expected; and how a NAFTA withdrawal could affect Mexico.

Chart of the day: Housing start numbers

Nov 17, 2016
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Marketplace staff

New home construction got a nice bump in October, beating expectations at 1.32 million units. As we reported today, the market was slow to recover from the housing bust, which made builders shy about breaking ground. Rent increases have created a crunch, so new construction is breaking new ground.

Janet Yellen is not quitting anytime soon

Nov 17, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

A reminder: President-elect Donald Trump has, on multiple occasions throughout his campaign, accused the sitting chair of the Federal Reserve of playing politics with interest rates to help Hillary Clinton get elected, and make President Barack Obama look good.

Trump's Ohio and the global economy

Nov 17, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal, Andrea Seabrook and Lane Wallace

Globalization can feel like an abstract force, or it can feel much more personal. Today, we've got the view from Dayton, Ohio. Plus, a look at the nitty-gritty of tax reform. As always, send us your questions about the economy and how it's changing post-election.

The stars are aligning for an interest rate hike

Nov 17, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about the chance of an interest rate hike next month; today's planned meeting between President-elect Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe; and a campaign to increase the amount of people who travel abroad.

Government panel wary of Chinese investment in U.S.

Nov 17, 2016
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Annie Baxter

President-elect Donald Trump talked tough on China throughout his campaign, calling the country a currency manipulator and vowing to slap tariffs on Chinese exports. Now a congressional commission has a new report urging greater scrutiny of Chinese investments in the U.S.

Trump's plan cuts taxes, but not for everyone

Nov 17, 2016
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Kim Adams

A cornerstone of Donald Trump’s economic pitch was an overhaul of the U.S. income tax system. The president-elect plans to condense personal tax brackets from seven down to two, with the top rate maxing out at 33 percent — significantly lower than the current top brackets. But that doesn’t mean every American will get a break; under Trump’s proposal, some middle- and lower-income people could actually pay more in taxes.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

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Marketplace

What's the latest news on the Trump administration? We'll look at what we might expect from Trump's planned meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe; the complications of managing the government's executive branch; and the president-elect's emerging economic policies. 

Special preview: Codebreaker season two

Nov 16, 2016
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Bruce Johnson

This season on our tech podcast "Codebreaker," we're asking: "Can it save us?" In this special preview of the first episode, you'll hear about a toddler who saved her mother's life with Siri, a man whose mysterious ailment opened up a world of voice recognition technology and a dating service that wants to scan the faces of all your exes. Listen, decode, and decide: Can recognition software save us?

Chart of the day: U.S fast food sales

Nov 16, 2016
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Sarah Menendez

Today is National Fast Food Day, so naturally we felt it was a perfect time to do the numbers on the U.S. fast food industry's biggest players. The chart above shows the change in sales in the last five years, using data from an IBISWorld report published in May. McDonald's holds 15.8 percent of the market share of the fast food industry, followed by Yum! Brands Inc., which holds 8.9 percent and, finally, Subway with 5 percent.

2016 has been a wild year for fast food

Nov 16, 2016
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Sarah Menendez

It's been quite a year for fast food (among other things). Given that today is #NationalFastFoodDay, we took a look back at some of the weird products and new releases from the fast food world this year.  It's likely that none of these gimmicks were meant to give companies any significant sales bumps. So why do it? It's all about the hype.

1. McDonald's doubled down on the all-day breakfast menu

Infrastructure, infrastructure, infrastructure

Nov 16, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Andrea Seabrook

We got a few questions about how Trump's infrastructure plan could get through a Republican-controlled Congress: Mike Rodgers asked, "since history indicates republicans don't want to fund anything, what's that mean for trumps ideas?" Justin Taylor asked, "how long will it take to get a $1 tril #infrastructure bill written, passed, signed, and get projects started, & $ flowing?" Marketplace's Washington D.C Bureau

On today's show, we'll talk about reports that Snapchat's parent company has filed for an IPO;  a request from automakers for Trump to review fuel economy and emissions regulations; and the relationship between weather and commodities. 

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Kim Adams

There are multiple reports that Snap, Inc., the company that owns the messaging app Snapchat, is getting ready to go public. The company reportedly expects to be valued at up to $25 billion, and its IPO could serve to test the waters for other big tech companies that have been relying solely on venture funding.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

You want economy? United has “basic” economy

Nov 16, 2016
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Gigi Douban

Starting next year, United Airlines will begin offering passengers a cheaper option for airline fares. The new “basic economy” fare, which gets you little more than a seat, makes United the latest major airline to try to lure passengers from ultra-low-cost carriers like Spirit and Frontier. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

Chicago puts sensors to work taking its vitals

Nov 15, 2016
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Miles Bryan

The city of Chicago is trying to get to know itself a little better.

The city, in partnership with the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory, recently began constructing the Array of Things — a network of 500 data sensors that will track the city's vitals. 

Perched on traffic signal poles, its sensors will monitor things like traffic flow, pedestrian traffic and air quality. The Array of Things is funded largely by a $3.1 million grant from the National Science Foundation, and is set to be fully installed by 2018.

Chart of the day: Education in prison

Nov 15, 2016
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Marketplace staff

A new study from the National Center for Education Statistics found more than half of adults in American prisons lack basic math skills, Inside Higher Ed notes, much higher than the general population. The portion lacking basic literacy was also quite a bit higher.

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Kai Ryssdal

What a difference a week — and election — can make.

In a new poll from Gallup, Americans' confidence in the economy was surveyed in the week before the election and the week after. We've moved from an index score of -10 to +3 — or, in other words, from being slightly negative to slightly positive.

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Amy Scott

As Donald Trump prepares to assume the presidency, calls are growing for the billionaire to cut ties to the business empire that bears his name. Trump has said he'll leave the day-to-day management of the Trump Organization to three of his children. And then appointed those same children to the executive committee of his presidential transition team, meaning they'll be involved in political appointments that could impact the family business.

Why China should top Trump's list

Nov 15, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

The United States and China have had a peaceful but strained relationship for many years, maintained primarily by trade deals and diplomacy between the two countries. President-elect Donald Trump has been very critical of China throughout his campaign, and many are wondering where U.S-China relations will end up under his presidency.

Is fiscal responsibility out the window?

Nov 15, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Andrea Seabrook

You guys had some questions about how Congress will work with a Trump presidency and whether fiscal responsibility will be out the window over the next four years.

We're tackling some of that today on the podcast starting with listener Jim Gordon, who asked: "How much can Trump directly affect policy with existing checks and balances? Will we see interest rates rise?"

Here's Washington Bureau Chief Andrea Seabrook:

On today's show, we'll talk about a growth in retail sales; airline stock gains amid Warren Buffet's decision to invest in American, United, Delta and Southwest; and how teachers are dealing with post-election bullying.

SEC Chair to step down

Nov 15, 2016
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Kim Adams

If you have money in the stock market, then the work of the Securities and Exchange Commission affects you. It's the group tasked with protecting investors and keeping the market functioning smoothly — basically a Wall Street watchdog. The leadership of that group is getting ready to change, with SEC Chair Mary Jo White announcing she will leave the post when President Barack Obama leaves office.

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Amy Scott

The Southern Poverty Law Center has sent out a new survey to teachers asking about the post-election climate in their schools. Since Donald Trump was elected, the anti-hate watchdog group has tallied hundreds of incidents of harassment and bullying at schools and on college campuses. In his recent “60 Minutes” interview with Lesley Stahl, President-elect Trump told supporters to “stop” harassing minorities.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

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