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Chad

AP Photo

Back in 2014 there was an enormous international outcry after Islamic militants from the group Boko Haram kidnapped 276 female high school students the town of Chibok in northeastern Nigeria.

Four years later, more than 100 of the Chibok girls may still be in Boko Haram’s custody. In the meantime, the group has continued to launch suicide bombings on civilians, kidnap schoolchildren and ambush Nigerian soldiers – despite repeated assurances from the Nigerian government that the militants had been defeated.

On this edition of Global Journalist a look at how Boko Haram’s two factions - one now calling itself the Islamic State in West Africa - have managed to persist in northern Nigeria. We’ll also hear about some big challenges for the education system in this part of Nigeria - where both the insurgency and a number of other factors are keeping tens of thousands of girls from going to school.


AP Photo

The Islamic State’s attacks in Europe earlier this year made headlines around the world. But there’s another terrorist group that by some estimates has killed more civilians over the past few years than ISIS.

That’s Boko Haram in northern Nigeria, which killed more than 6,000 people last year.

It’s a group known for tactics like using child suicide bombers, striking churches at Christmas and kidnapping schoolgirls, like the 276 taken from the town of Chibok in 2014.

The violence has caused a humanitarian crisis that could lead to more people dying of starvation than bullets. About 2.5 million people have been forced from their homes by its attacks.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at a murderous terror group that has thrived for 14 years despite the efforts of Nigeria and its neighbors to defeat it.


Courtesy photo

You see them on the battlefields patrolling the front lines and risking their lives.

But they are not soldiers, at least not in the traditional sense. They’re war correspondents. These brave men and women travel to the most dangerous parts of the globe, all for the story.

For many journalists, covering one war is enough. But there’s a small group of reporters and photographers who have made it their career to jump from one war to another.