Charlie Hebdo

Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

The French publication Charlie Hebdo has a long history of publishing controversial cartoons. But after an attack on its offices that left 10 staff and two police officers dead, news organizations are grappling with the ethics of reprinting those same cartoons. The graphic depictions may provide relevant context, yet are deeply offensive to many of the Muslim faith. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the publication on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."


It’s been more than a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out its first edition, again with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover.  Who is republishing the cartoons? Who isn’t? Is it possible to give this story context without using it? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


The first post-attack edition of Charlie Hebdo has sold out in France, just hours after it was released.

France 24 reports that people lined up in front of newsstands as they opened. The network adds:

via Flickr user Valentina Cala

It's been a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out is first edition since the January 7, 2015 shooting that left 12 dead.  On its cover: another cartoon showing the image of the Prophet Mohammed.  What message are editors trying to send?

Satire is a tricky business. The punch lines quickly get stale. The same people who laugh at one joke can get offended by the next.

But this week, with the targeted killings of the cartoon satirists of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, we were reminded how dangerous people with no sense of humor can be.

The Onion ran a headline: "It is Sadly Unclear Whether This Article Will Put Lives At Risk."

French authorities are still on the hunt for two brothers suspected in an attack against the headquarters of a satirical magazine in Paris that left 12 people dead.

The two chief suspects, named as Said and Chérif Kouachi, 34 and 32, remain at large. Investigators believe Said Kouachi traveled to Yemen in 2011 to receive weapons training with Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports, citing U.S. officials who've been briefed on the case.

When Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Khomeini issued a 1989 fatwa calling for the killing of British writer Salman Rushdie, many in the West could scarcely believe a literary novel would prompt an international death threat.

We've come a long way since then.

Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

On Tuesday, January 7, French authorities confirmed three gunman shot and killed 12 people in Paris at the offices of the weekly satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The paper has run cartoons and other content satirizing radical Islam, and the Prophet Mohammed. In 2011, the paper was firebombed. 

French President Francois Holland called the shootings a "terrorist attack of the most extreme barbarity" and video shows armed gunman running through the streets of Paris. As of the shows' recording, the suspects remain at large. 

  A gunman targets Paris weekly Charlie Hebdo known for satirizing Islam and the prophet Mohammed.  Also, a preview of the legislative session now underway in Jefferson City, why Kirby Delauter doesn’t want his name in the press,  the historical accuracy of the film Selma, and remembering ESPN’s Stuart Scott.  From the Missouri School of Journalism, Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Bob Priddy: Views of the News.


When a 2011 firebombing destroyed the office of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, editor Stephane Charbonnier said the publication would not shy away from taking jabs at radical Islam.

"If we can poke fun at everything in France, if we can talk about anything in France apart from Islam or the consequences of Islamism, that is annoying," Charbonnier said at the time. "This is the first time we have been physically attacked, but we won't let it get to us."