Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens is praising Missouri's revamped Clean Water Commission for allowing two new concentrated animal feeding operations in the state.

Greitens in a Thursday statement said the state needs "more farms, more jobs and less government."

Neighbors worried about pollution, smell and other issues have been fighting RNR Farms in McDonald County and Trenton Farms in Grundy County for years. Previous clean water commissioners voted against the chicken and hog farms.

Couresy PETA

A recent Missouri law meant to protect farmers may be making it harder to report alleged animal abuse, as animal welfare organizations have feared.

The People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) on Wednesday asked law enforcement in Mercer County to investigate allegations of abuse at Murphy-Brown’s Badger-Wolf pig-breeding operation in northern Missouri. But PETA says it could not reveal who gave PETA the photos that captured the abuse, as the source of the information “is afraid of reprisals.”

KBIA / KBIA

 

Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, or CAFOs, are prevalent in Missouri’s agriculture industry. The large farms are very controversial, and many have concerns about the environmental impact of the farms and humane treatment of animals living there. In Callaway County, plans for a new CAFO have prompted very vocal opposition. But CAFOs are also a mainstay of the agriculture industry, and are legal if maintained correctly.On this Intersection we addressed CAFOs in-depth: about what they are, how they’re used in Missouri, about the controversy surrounding them, and about the future of the operations in the state.