COVID-19 | KBIA

COVID-19

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

We at KBIA have found strength in our community during the COVID-19 crisis. In our series “Where You’re At,” we’re calling our neighbors to see how they’re coping during the pandemic.

If you want to share your story, email KBIA at news@kbia.org.

Here is DC Benincasa’s call with Will Nulty, a college student and server at a national chain restaurant in Columbia:

KBIA

This weekend was supposed to be graduation at MU. Typically, the month of May throughout Mid-Missouri is full of families celebrating -- students in caps and gowns and photo shoots at the columns. The coronavirus pandemic has halted all of that. These days, many students are packed up and living off campus awaiting plans for the fall, all while MU’s administration is tasked with deciding what’s next during this uncertain time. 

KBIA

Food producers, especially small-scale food producers, have been hit hard by the virus crisis. As farmers markets and other regular access points to consumers have been limited, local producers have had to find alternate avenues for connecting with consumers.

In this episode, we highlight one innovative project that’s been created to address a big problem that this pandemic has created: disrupted supply lines and distribution of food. 

KBIA

For a week now, our community has been under new rules. Restaurants, gyms, hair salons and churches have re-opened their doors. We are in the hopeful beginning phases of finding a new normal. Our key words have gone from "stay at home" and lockdown, to recovery and reopening.

The state of Missouri is in the first phase of the Show Me Strong Recovery Program and the City of Columbia and Boone County have also issued the first step in reopening guidelines that have been in place for a week.

KBIA

When it comes to issues arising from the coronavirus crisis that need to be aired out in this forum, our pets might not be the first priority. But yet it seems like a lot of conversations right now involve our animals.

How are they doing? Do our dogs and cats seem stressed out? What’s happening with adoptions and fostering of animals these days? And what about all the wildlife - the fox cubs, coyotes, even snakes - that people seem to be spotting outside their windows. Is the wild encroaching on our space for some reason, or is it just that we’re simply at home more so we’re noticing nature?

KBIA

As the coronavirus continues to spread, and as states and local governments are looking at re-opening plans - the race is on. Researchers all over the country are working together to find treatments and vaccines.

The FDA and American Red Cross have partnered with the Mayo Clinic for a clinical trial involving “convalescent plasma.” It’s exploring the idea that people who have recovered from an illness now have antibodies for it in their blood that might help in the fight against COVID-19.

And MU Health Care is a partner in this innvovative effort.

Where You're At: MU Senior And Musician

May 6, 2020
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

We at KBIA have found strength in our community during the COVID-19 crisis. In our series “Where You’re At,” we’re talking to our neighbors to see how they’re coping during the pandemic.

If you want to share your story, email KBIA at news@kbia.org.

Here is Olivia Moses’ conversation with Kelsey Christiansen, a musician and a senior at the University of Missouri studying English:

KBIA

Last month, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson signed into law a $6.2 billion supplemental funding package to address the economic crisis brought on by the coronavirus. Now, the state will begin doling out some of those funds to local governments so they can be used to prop up healthcare, education, social programs and more during this challenging time.

KBIA

We at KBIA have found strength in our community during the COVID-19 crisis. In our series “Where You’re At,” we’re calling our neighbors to see how they’re coping during the pandemic.

It you want to share your story, email KBIA at news@kbia.org.

Here’s Tina Tan’s call with Helen Golden, a retiree who volunteers at St. Mary’s Hospital - Audrain in Mexico.

KBIA

You may have seen the call-outs on social media or the messages from local charities in your email inbox. Today, May 5th, has been designated as a worldwide day of philanthropy and generosity - it’s Giving Tuesday. And this year, a lot of people are in need of our generosity. 

KBIA

We at KBIA have found strength in our community during the COVID-19 crisis. In our series “Where You’re At,” we’re calling our neighbors to see how they’re coping during the pandemic. 

If you want to share your story, email KBIA at news@kbia.org. 

Here’s Alec Stutson’s coversation with Fairview Elementary School music teacher Sara Dexheimer in Columbia:

Workers in hazmat gear work at a gravesite
Jerome Delay / AP

Two journalists who covered Ebola when victims of an outbreak in Africa came to the United States for treatment six years ago discuss how that experience compares to today's COVID-19 pandemic.

Ebola, which continues to flare in Africa, causes fever and internal bleeding and kills half the people who contract it, according to the World Health Organization.


KBIA

It’s Ramadan and many in our community are fasting throughout the day and breaking fast at midnight as they do every year. But this year, Ramadan is happening virtually because of the coronavirus pandemic. We check in to see how the community is adjusting.

In this episode, we also talk about how the about the landscape of art and culture in Columbia is changing during this crisis -- particularly how visual artists are responding to and creating during this crisis.

Pork Producer Says it Needs Flexibility on Virus Guidelines

Apr 30, 2020
US Environmental Protection Agency

O’FALLON, Mo. (AP) — The world’s largest pork producer told a judge in Missouri on Thursday that it was working as quickly as it can to comply with federal guidelines that seek to slow the spread of the coronavirus but that it needs some flexibility in an industry where people typically work side by side.

Missouri State Workers Seek More Protection from COVID-19

Apr 30, 2020
Meiying Wu / KBIA

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Advocates for Missouri state workers on Thursday called on Gov. Mike Parson to do more to protect employees from the coronavirus.

Union leaders, Democratic state lawmakers and other advocates for worker rights want no-strings-attached premium pay for workers, more N95 masks and the chance for more employees to work from home.

KBIA

Being in the midst of a global pandemic has a way of changing things. Our cultural landmarks and touchstones disappear, our way of life and things we hold sacred are disrupted, and sometimes fear can take over. 

We aim to maintain productivity, celebration and connections during a crisis - but sometimes as a culture our responses are not so helpful. What happens when your experience during a pandemic is not one of connectedness and cohesion but one of disruption and disintegration?

In this episode, we talk about cultural response to pandemics, historically and now, and how that response can sometimes involve discrimination, stigma, isolation and what we can do as a community to avoid those responses in favor of something more postive.

Provided by Louise Secker

In 2011, a devastating EF5 tornado tore through the city of Joplin, and in the wake of that disaster, Lafayette House was there to provide services to survivors of domestic and sexual violence.

Louise Secker is the Director of Development for Lafayette House in Joplin. The shelter assists survivors of domestic and sexual violence, as well as people with substance use disorders. She spoke with KBIA’s Rebecca Smith about how the lessons of the 2011 Joplin tornado have helped them adjust to delivering care to survivors during the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Kristofor Husted / KBIA

We at KBIA have found strength in our community during the COVID-19 crisis. In our series “Where You’re At,” we’re calling our neighbors to see how they’re coping during the pandemic. 

If you want to share your story, email KBIA at news@kbia.org. 

Here’s my call with speech language pathologist and first time mother-to-be Megan Pelikan in Columbia:

Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

Remember when we were all fascinated by the unfolding election year and presidential primaries? 

Today, that seems a lifetime ago. The coronavirus broke out in the United States just in time for the Democratic presidential primary. Around 40 people tested positive after Wisconsin’s primary election, and states are now scrambling to find a better, safer way to vote.

Amid everything else - this is still an election year. Voters in Boone County and throughout Missouri will make decisions on June 2nd - and there’s that other little election coming up in November.

KBIA

As a community, we've watched businesses close, streets and campuses empty, and more people wear masks and gloves when they leave the house. We’ve watched our world physically change around us.

But for people who are incarcerated, this crisis has looked different. People who are detained in Missouri and elsewhere are largely at the mercy of the environment and whatever it is that’s happening inside prisons. 

Diane McMillen

For hundreds of elderly and disabled residents in Missouri, personal care attendants, or PCAs, are a lifeline that stave off isolation and help them stay out of nursing homes. The field was already facing a shortage of workers before the COVID-19 pandemic began, but now, things are even worse.


AP

Smithfield Foods, uno de los mayores productores de carne en el país, estaría operando su planta en Milan, Missouri, en una manera que estaría contribuyendo a la propagación del coronavirus, de acuerdo a lo planteado en un juicio federal abierto el jueves 23 de abril en Kansas City. 

KBIA

In this episode, we talk about seniors — how to stay safe, keep in touch with family and friends, and stay healthy during this coronavirus pandemic.  We explore what's going on in Missouri's nursing homes and long-term care facilities, the challenges workers and residents face there and what it's like being a senior during the COVID-19 outbreak.

KBIA

We at KBIA have found strength in our community during the COVID-19 crisis. In our series “Where You’re At,” we’re calling our neighbors to see how they’re coping during the pandemic.

If you want to share your story, email KBIA at news@kbia.org.

Here’s my call with Emergency Room physician and soon-to-be-father Andrew Pelikan in Columbia:

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

One thing during this coronavirus crisis that’s changed for all of us in some form is food - how we’re accessing it, how we’re cooking it and maybe even how we’re growing it.

In this episode, we talk about how we’re getting food and what we’re doing with it during this crisis. Our guests are deeply entrenched in the food world and use their talents to help organize community food and gardening networks.

KBIA

You’ve seen the headlines with places like New York, Chicago and Detroit that have become hotspots for coronavirus cases. Those stories report on overcrowded hospitals and ventilator shortages.

Meanwhile rural areas have been slower to get COVID-19 cases. But now, some rural counties in Missouri are seeing spikes in cases in places that already have fewer resources and uncertain funding streams.

That's left some rural clinics struggling to keep their doors open.

In this episode, we’re talking about the coronavirus crisis in rural Missouri and how providers are handling preparation and coping with funding shortfalls.

Silhouette of a mosquito seen through a microscope
Felipe Dana / AP

At first, it just seemed like an odd story to pursue during a quiet post-Christmas week in the newsroom in 2015. But New York Times reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr.'s interest in what would become the Zika epidemic has made him something of  an expert on viral outbreaks.

After his work on Zika, the virus that ravaged newborns in the tropics, McNeil now finds himself covering the even more deadly coronavirus that is causing COVID-19. In this episode, he gives a reporter's view of the ethics of covering a pandemic while a public health official, the University of Missouri's Lynelle Phillips, offers a different perspective.


University Plans to Prepare For Student and Staff Return

Apr 22, 2020
Sara Shahriari / KBIA

The University of Missouri announced that it is planning to resume in-person classes in the fall for its Columbia campus. 

The University says it is working with public health officials and their own health care experts in developing systems to protect students and staff when they return. Faculty and staff will return in phases as the pandemic begins to decline.

KBIA

Food is at the forefront of many Missourians' minds right now. For some, there’s nothing more anxiety-inducing than empty shelves at the grocery store.

But what many of us don’t think about is what’s going on behind the scenes — how all the intricate food processes that typically align so perfectly are being affected by the pandemic as much as individuals are. It’s difficult to overstate how important farmers are to the lives of every single Missourian. And just like the rest of us right now, they’re suffering.

Zhihan Huang / Missouri Business Alert

As the rate of new COVID-19 cases in a few urban areas across Missouri slows, cases in some rural counties are spiking. With at least 102 confirmed cases of COVID-19 Wednesday morning, Saline County has a rate of more than 445 cases per 100,000 residents — the highest in the state. That figure is almost double the rate in St. Louis County, which has the most confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state with 2,417. Saline County has two major meat processing plants in Marshall, owned by Cargill and ConAgra Brands - both of which say employees have tested positive.

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