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Attorneys for the police force and prosecutor that oversaw the grand jury investigation after Michael Brown's 2014 death in Ferguson have asked a federal judge to consider blocking the release of "grisly" photographs of the black 18-year-old's body to his family's attorneys, worried they could prompt violence if leaked.

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Defense attorneys in the wrongful-death lawsuit by Michael Brown's parents cite recent rampages that killed police in warning against expanding who can see unredacted grand jury transcripts related to Brown's death.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

 A St. Louis federal judge is ordering for the first time the release of unredacted grand jury transcripts in the Ferguson police shooting death of Michael Brown to lawyers for his family.

U.S. District Judge E. Richard Webber signed off Monday on an order requiring St. Louis County prosecutors to hand over the testimony and the names of grand jury witnesses to attorneys for Brown's family pressing a wrongful-death lawsuit.

Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

Ferguson city leaders, struggling to balance a budget decimated by fallout from unrest that followed the police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown, will ask voters in August for a second tax increase.

Voters in the St. Louis suburb in April approved a half-cent sales tax increase and narrowly defeated a property tax increase.

The Ferguson City Council at a special meeting Sunday voted to put on the Aug. 2 ballot a proposal to raise the city utility tax by 2 percent.

Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

The St. Louis suburb thrust into worldwide headlines last year with the police shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown is inviting the public to weigh in on its neighborhood policing efforts.

KBIA file photo

  Two St. Louis men are headed to federal prison for seven years each for planning a bomb attack targeting the Ferguson police chief and other officials after an officer killed Michael Brown there last year.

Olajuwon Davis and Brandon Orlando Baldwin pleaded guilty in June to felony counts of conspiring to use explosives and making false written statements while buying firearms. They were sentenced Thursday in St. Louis.

Cassie Marshall / Flickr

A Missouri appeals court will not hear a man's case regarding the dismissal of his affidavit claiming Ferguson officer Darren Wilson assaulted Michael Brown before fatally shooting him.

 

Mike Matthes / City of Columbia website

An attorney representing the Columbia Police Officer's Association (CPOA) sent a letter to City Manager Mike Matthes today asking him to rescind a request to remove the association's executive director, Dale Roberts.

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The makeshift memorial that has marked the site of where Michael Brown was fatally shot by a police officer in August now has been cleared out, and a permanent plaque will be placed nearby.

A man who was with Michael Brown when Brown was fatally shot by a Ferguson police officer last year is charged with misdemeanor resisting arrest over a new confrontation with police. 

The parents of Michael Brown filed a wrongful death suit Thursday against the city of Ferguson, former Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson and former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who fatally shot Brown.

Attorney Benjamin Crump pointed to a U.S. Department of Justice report that uncovered racial bias in the Ferguson Police Department.

Bob McCulloch Spoke on MU's Campus, But to a Select Group

Apr 2, 2015
KARA TABOR / KBIA

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch spoke at the Missouri School of Law on Tuesday about the grand jury process. McCulloch was the lead prosecutor to handle the jury during the Ferguson case that decided not to indict former officer Darren Wilson who shot and killed Michael Brown last August. 

The event was not heavily promoted. Instead, it was only open to students, faculty and staff of the MU Law School who had to register for the event. The student chapter of the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys organized McCulloch's appearance, and said due to full capacity of Hulston Hall the public was not allowed in, including the media. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

 


Public, Media Locked out of Bob McCulloch Speech at MU Law School

Apr 1, 2015
St. Louis County

Updated: Video of talk and Q&A added below. 

St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch spoke Tuesday at the University of Missouri School of Law about the grand jury process and his experience handling the investigation into now-former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson’s responsibility in the shooting death of Michael Brown last year.

The MU student chapter of the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys organized the event, which restricted to law school students and faculty who had to register prior. Media and the public were not allowed to attend the talk.

About four months before the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, police less than 15 miles down I-70 in St. Charles shot another man named Brown. The event barely drew any attention from anyone except immediate family and friends.

Since Michael Brown was shot and killed last year, people within the St. Louis region have been immersed in social and public policy introspection.

Why did the Justice Department conclude that Michael Brown didn’t cry out “Don’t shoot” and that, if he had his hands up, it was only for a moment before he began moving back toward Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson?

The shakeup of Ferguson’s government continued in earnest on Tuesday with the resignation of city manager John Shaw.

It’s easily the most significant departure yet from a Ferguson city official since a Department of Justice report sharply criticized the city's police department and municipal court system.

Updated as of 10:30 pm., April 22, 2015:

The family of Michael Brown will file a wrongful death lawsuit against the City of Ferguson on Thursday, according to a news  release sent Wednesday night.

Seven months after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, the U.S. Department of Justice today released two investigations - one that cleared Wilson and the other that accused Ferguson police and courts of violating constitutional rights.

The Ferguson police department and municipal court engaged in such a widespread pattern of unconstitutional conduct that it lost the trust of the people, the Justice Department concluded after a seven-month investigation.

(Updated at 7:30 p.m. with comments from St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch)

The U.S. Justice Department’s report into the fatal of shooting of Michael Brown by then-police officer Darren Wilson makes two basic findings: investigators were not convinced that Wilson committed a federal crime; and that even if they were to indict Wilson, they didn’t believe they would be able to win at trial.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

A Justice Department report says blacks in Ferguson are disproportionately subjected to excessive police force, baseless traffic stops, and citations for petty infractions -- like walking down the middle of the street.

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Michael Brown's uncle says a Department of Justice decision not to charge the Ferguson police officer who fatally shot his nephew is deflating.

(This post was last updated at 7 p.m. ET.)

Darren Wilson, the former Ferguson, Mo., police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown last August, will not face federal civil rights charges over the killing. That's according to the Justice Department, which has now released its reviews of both the shooting and the local police department.

While Wilson will avoid federal charges, the Justice Department review found that the Ferguson Police Department engages in "a pattern of unconstitutional policing."

As police in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson seek alternatives to the sort of lethal force that led to Michael Brown's death, they're testing a new device that attaches to a handgun barrel and turns a bullet into a projectile intended to stun but not kill.

Null Value / Flickr

  St. Louis officials want to spend nearly $10 million to hire and train 160 additional police officers in response to a recent spate of violent crime that the mayor and police chief blame on a "Ferguson effect." 

The Justice Department is poised to declare that former police officer Darren Wilson should not face civil rights charges over the death of Michael Brown, law enforcement sources tell NPR. Wilson, who is white, shot and killed Brown, who was black, in August. Brown was not armed.

"Two law enforcement sources tell NPR they see no way forward to file criminal civil rights charges" against Wilson, NPR's Carrie Johnson reports. She adds, "Those charges would require authorities to prove the officer used excessive force and violated Brown's constitutional rights."

KBIA File Photo

Ferguson's first municipal election since a fatal police shooting sparked months of protests has drawn relatively little interest from prospective candidates as the filing deadline approaches.

Three of the St. Louis suburb's six City Council seats are up for election on April 7 and none of the three incumbents plans to seek re-election.

Ferguson Mayor James Knowles says two of those council members decided not to run again well before 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot to death by Ferguson officer Darren Wilson in August.

david_shane / Flickr

Police killings of unarmed residents in Missouri, New York and elsewhere have prompted an array of proposed policy changes as legislatures across the nation began their new sessions. 

St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch and two of his assistants are facing a misconduct complaint for the way they handled the grand jury that investigated former Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.  

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