Deaf | KBIA

Deaf

Global Journalist: Making media accessible

Nov 18, 2020
Photo of an interpreter for the deaf signing behind a man speaking at a podium during a press conference.
Wilfredo Lee / AP

Modern media offers accessible information to a worldwide audience, but barriers still remain. Thirty years after the Americans with Disabilities Act became law, inconsistent captioning, improper ASL interpretation, and obtuse design hinder many from receiving critical news.

Moreover many who could provide valuable perspectives on what it's like to be "differently abled" are blocked from producing that journalism by newsrooms' failure to build accessibility into the process.

In this episode, journalists look at what it will take to fix the problem — and why it matters. We thank the interpreters who assisted us in our interviews with some of the journalists. Theirs are some of the voices you will hear on this podcast. For a transcript of the program, click here.


MCDHH Facebook Page

The Missouri Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing announced today that they’re making clear, accessible masks available to Missourians.

These accessible masks have clear fronts, which allow people to clearly see an individual’s mouth while they speak. This aspect of communication is critical for those who read lips and an integral part of effective communication for those who speak American Sign Language.


Kassidy Arena / KBIA

American Sign Language is now the third most popular language college students choose to learn. According to the Modern Language Association most recent report, 107,060 students in higher education chose to learn ASL. This puts the language right behind Spanish and French, but before German.

 

 

ASL is the primary language for deaf and hard of hearing people to communicate, but not all deaf and hard of hearing people use it.

Janet Saidi / KBIA

Nearly 29 years after the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, citizens, organizations, companies and campuses are still working on providing access and accommodations for those who need it to engage with and experience the world - its streets, its buildings, its concerts, classrooms, and even its radio programs.

Esteem Website

The University of Missouri’s Ear, Nose and Throat Center is now offering a new solution to hearing loss, becoming the only health provider in the state to offer a new fully implantable hearing device to patients.


Michaela Tucker / KBIA

When a woman is trying to leave an abusive relationship or unsafe domestic situation, shelters offer a safe space for her to stay and get back on her feet. But leaving an abusive relationship can be difficult for any woman.

According to the National Domestic Abuse Hotline, a woman seeking help will be in and out of a shelter seven times on average, before leaving the relationship. For deaf individuals, that number doubles.


L.E.A.D. Institute Executive Director Dr. Stephanie Logan sits at her desk, the same one she's had her whole career at L.E.A.D.
Michaela Tucker / KBIA

The deaf community has its own language, culture and set of obstacles, and most hearing people will never interact with it. But Dr. Stephanie Logan was thrust into the deaf community when she lost her hearing at the age of 23.

Logan was studying psychology at the University of Georgia when she contracted spinal meningitis. In less than a week, her hearing was completely gone.