Department of Justice

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FERGUSON - Ferguson's city manager says failure of a property tax increase should have no "major effects" on the city's agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice or efforts to adopt community policing in the St. Louis suburb where Michael Brown was fatally shot by an officer.

Ferguson voters on Tuesday approved a sales tax increase but rejected a property tax hike proposal.

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The Justice Department says it will drop a lawsuit against Ferguson if the City Council approves a proposed agreement to reform its police department and court.

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Some Ferguson residents are challenging the city's decision to reject a federal agreement to overhaul its police department and municipal courts.

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As Ferguson prepares to do legal battle with the Justice Department, city leaders acknowledge the possibility that they might someday disband the police department and cede law enforcement to another agency.

The question is: Would anyone else want it?

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Missouri's top two elected officials are crediting Ferguson for pressing ahead with policing and court reforms despite a U.S. Department of Justice lawsuit over the St. Louis suburb's justice system.

Afternoon Newscast for February 10, 2016

Feb 10, 2016

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:


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The Justice Department has filed a civil rights lawsuit against the city of Ferguson, one day after the city council voted to revise an agreement aimed at improving how police and courts treat poor people and minorities in the St. Louis suburb.

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A group of Ferguson residents is urging transparency from city officials who are negotiating with the U.S. Department of Justice to resolve policing practices criticized in a department report earlier this year.

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The U.S. Department of Justice has released a report critical of the St. Louis County Family Court, alleging that black youths are treated more harshly than whites, and juveniles are often deprived of constitutional rights.

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  A Justice Department report summary has found across-the-board flaws in police's response last summer to the protests in Ferguson, including antagonizing crowds and violating free-speech rights.

The Associated Press obtained the summary, which cites "vague and arbitrary" orders to keep protesters moving that violated their rights of assembly and free speech.

Why did the Justice Department conclude that Michael Brown didn’t cry out “Don’t shoot” and that, if he had his hands up, it was only for a moment before he began moving back toward Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson?

The shakeup of Ferguson’s government continued in earnest on Tuesday with the resignation of city manager John Shaw.

It’s easily the most significant departure yet from a Ferguson city official since a Department of Justice report sharply criticized the city's police department and municipal court system.

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Missouri governor Jay Nixon says municipal courts need to be reformed to restore trust between citizens and the government eroded by abuses like those detailed in a Department of Justice report on Ferguson.

Ferguson Mayor James Knowles provided little indication how his city would respond to a scathing Department of Justice report documenting pervasive racial bias in the city’s police department and municipal court system. But he listed several steps the city was already taking to deal with allegations of bias.

Seven months after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot and killed Michael Brown, the U.S. Department of Justice today released two investigations - one that cleared Wilson and the other that accused Ferguson police and courts of violating constitutional rights.

The Ferguson police department and municipal court engaged in such a widespread pattern of unconstitutional conduct that it lost the trust of the people, the Justice Department concluded after a seven-month investigation.

(Updated at 7:30 p.m. with comments from St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch)

The U.S. Justice Department’s report into the fatal of shooting of Michael Brown by then-police officer Darren Wilson makes two basic findings: investigators were not convinced that Wilson committed a federal crime; and that even if they were to indict Wilson, they didn’t believe they would be able to win at trial.

KBIA

Michael Brown's uncle says a Department of Justice decision not to charge the Ferguson police officer who fatally shot his nephew is deflating.