Ethiopia | KBIA

Ethiopia

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Thousands of children have been used as soldiers in at least 18 countries around the world in the past two years.

For the children who survive, the trauma of war can have long-lasting impacts.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’re going to hear about how two aid groups are trying to address this issue in South Sudan and Uganda. We'll also hear from two ex-child soldiers about how the trauma of fighting in wars shaped their lives.

This program first aired Nov. 29, 2018.

AP Photo

Thousands of children have been used as soldiers in at least 18 countries around the world in the past two years.

For the children who survive, the trauma of war can have long-lasting impacts.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’re going to hear about how two aid groups are trying to address this issue in South Sudan and Uganda. We'll also hear from two ex-child soldiers about how the trauma of fighting in wars shaped their lives.


European Pressphoto

The young nation of Eritrea is often referred to as the North Korea of Africa.

The country has jailed thousands of political prisoners, eliminated the independent press and forces much of the population into indefinite military service. Border guards sometimes ‘shoot to kill’ Eritreans fleeing the country.

But since a July peace agreement, with longtime adversary Ethiopia,  Eritreans are waiting to see if new contacts with the outside world will open up a closed state.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Eritrea's moment of opportunity.

AP Photo

The East African nation of Ethiopia has spent much of the last three decades as an authoritarian one-party state.

Political opponents of the ruling Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front were regularly jailed. Independent journalists could be beaten, exiled or charged with terrorism.

But earlier this year a new prime minister took power in Africa’s second-most populous nation and has set out to make some big changes. Abiy Ahmed is just 41, and is often compared by Ethiopians to Barack Obama for his youthful looks and energetic speeches.

He's released hundreds of political prisoners - including many charged under a sweeping “anti-terrorism” law. He’s made overtures to Ethiopia’s archenemy Eritrea and condemned his own security forces' use of torture and arbitrary detention.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Ethiopia’s new prime minister and his efforts to open one of Africa’s most repressive states.


Jill Craig/VOA/via Wikimedia

When South Sudan became a country in 2011, there was a lot of optimism in a nation where people had endured decades of conflict to win independence from Sudan.

But within three years, the country had descended into its own civil war – a war that continues to this day.

Today more than a third of South Sudan’s population has been forced from their homes. Children are used as soldiers and mass rape as a weapon of war.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at why the government and the main rebel group have been unable to make peace, and whether a policy shift by the Trump administration may lead to a deal.


AP Photo

The use of orphanages fell out of favor in the U.S. around World War II, and the institutions were largely replaced by the foster care system.

But in parts of Asia and Africa, the number of orphanages has actually risen in recent decades – spurred in part by the death toll from conflict and HIV/AIDS. Many of these institutions are privately owned or run by non-profits and receive no government money. Instead, they are funded entirely by donations.

The growth has led to criticism by some child advocates. They argue that most children would be better off living with relatives or others. They also worry that in some countries the growth in orphanages has been spurred in part by adults looking to pad their own pockets by capitalizing on tourists willing to pay to volunteer at childrens’ homes.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the debate around institutional child care in developing countries and what might be perpetuating the problem of overseas orphanage scams.


AP Photo

The United Nations says that the world is facing the worst food crisis since World War II. Two of the hardest hit countries are in East Africa. In South Sudan, the UN has made its first formal famine declaration in six years.

Meanwhile drought and conflict in nearby Somalia are leading to comparisons with that country's 2011 famine, where 250,000 people died. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges to heading off mass starvation in two of the world's poorest countries.


AP Photo

Until recently, Ethiopia has been hailed as an African success story. After a decade of strong economic growth, the country has begun to shed its image as a famine-struck wasteland.

But repression by Ethiopia’s authoritarian government has sparked demonstrations that have led to the deaths of hundreds of protesters this year.

The movement gained worldwide attention at the Rio Olympics when the country’s silver medal-winning marathon runner Feyisa Lilesa crossed his wrists above his head at the finish line in a symbol of the protest movement.

AP

 

For much of its population, Somalia is a difficult and dangerous place to live.

It’s particularly true for reporters. Practicing journalism in a failed state means facing threats from any number of militia groups.

That includes Islamist radicals from al-Shabaab as well as from armed groups loyal to Somalia’s internationally-backed government in Mogadishu. At least 59 Somali journalists have been killed since 1992-the year after the fall of dictator Siad Barre threw the country into chaos.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the state of journalism in Somalia.


AP

Eritrea is sometimes described as "the North Korea of Africa." And it's a deserved title.

The tiny nation, located on the continent’s northeastern coast bordering Ethiopia, Sudan, and Djibouti is ranked dead last out of 180 countries on Reporters’ Without Borders’ World Press Freedom Index. All privately-owned media outlets were shuttered more than a decade ago. In 2015, Eritreans were by far the largest source of African migrants making the dangerous Mediterranean crossing into Europe.


Magali Girardin / EPA

Eritrea is sometimes described as "the North Korea of Africa." And it's a deserved title.

Sayyid Azim / AP

You see the label on coffee, chocolate, t-shirts and even gold, “Fair Trade.” The extra dollars you pay for the products are meant to guarantee they’re produced ethically and sustainably. And that the farmers and workers who produced them are justly compensated. What began as a humble effort by a few churches and activists a half a century ago to help people in the developing world has grown into a multibillion dollar industry. But the movement has attracted critics, who say the label today is mostly marketing that benefits companies in Europe and the U.S.

Jerome Delay / AP

Ethiopia's parliamentary elections are set to be held May 24th, but there is little doubt the ruling party will win an overwhelming majority amidst a crackdown on independent media and political dissidents. This week on Global Journalist, we look at why and how the restrictions on the media in Africa's second-most populous country began, and speak with a journalist who spent more than a year in prison for reporting.