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Missouri Joins Investigation Into Facebook

Oct 23, 2019

Missouri is among 47 U.S. states forming a coalition aimed at investigating Facebook’s potential antitrust violations.

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt announced his office’s participation in the multistate coalition Tuesday. The coalition plans to investigate whether Facebook has “harmed competition, raised prices for advertising, reduced the quality of consumer experiences, or misused consumer data,” according to a news release from Schmitt’s office.

Photo by Eepeng Cheong via Unsplash

Teens, tired of how the news media covers stories that matter to them, take matters into their own hands. This week, a look at several teen-run news and information sources, and what they’re telling us about the Gen Z audience.

Subscriptions soar following a Baltimore Sun editorial in response to President Trump’s attack on the livability of the city. Are Americans voting with their dollars?

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Is the internet broken? Members of the U.S. House of Representatives think so, and will begin investigating potential anti-trust violations among some of America’s tech giants. First up? A hearing on the effects companies like Google and Facebook have had on local journalism.

via LinkedIn

Nearly four years after the traffic stop that led to the arrest, and death, of motorist Sandra Bland, a new cell phone video emerges that tells a story different from the police dashcam video. Why di it take so long to surface?

Two Reuters journalists jailed in Myanmar for more than 500 days were unexpectedly freed Tuesday in a widespread amnesty. What led to this twist of fate?

Courtesy WTOL

It might be the most cringeworthy video to go viral this year. Why did the news staff at WTOL-TV produce a hype video for the Toledo Public Schools? And, how might it compromise the staff’s reporting efforts in the future?

Courtesy CBS

Gayle King’s interview with R. Kelly has been described as a master class for journalists. This week, an analysis of her questions, her body language, and the discussion the conversation created.

James Duncan Davidson/Flickr

Word of the National Enquirer’s attempts to extort Amazon owner Jeff Bezos has led to criminal investigations and offered subtle hints about his attitude toward editorial control at the Washington Post.

VCU Capital News Service

A tip from a “concerned citizen” has created a controversy around the governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Ralph Northam.

via California National Guard

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Details are slowly starting to emerge about what might have happened to journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi embassy in Istanbul. How aggressively is the Trump administration really pressing for answers? And, how are news organizations changing their approach to working in Saudi Arabia.

Hatice Cengiz, New York Times: “My fiancé Jamal Khashoggi was a lonely patriot

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via Flickr user Annie Mole

Layoffs at Tronc’s New York Daily News nearly decimated the newspaper’s staff, leaving some to claim the nation’s biggest city a local news desert. How can it be that local news is dying in a city of more than 10 million people?

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via Flickr Brian Solis

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appeared before Congress to answer questions about users’ privacy on the social media platform. At least one senator inquired as to why users don’t seem clear on how their data is collected and used. Could it lead to regulation?

via Flickr user www.quotecatalog.com

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product?

via Flickr user 2012 Pop Culture Geek

It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts?It was the first Academy Awards of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements. How did Hollywood respond and what does this year’s best picture, The Shape of Water tell us about representation of disability in the arts?

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The network notified Lauer of it's decision late Tuesday night after an investigation into claims of 'inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace.'  Keillor notified the Associated Press of his firing in an email to the agency. 

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Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, New York Times: “Harvey Weinstein paid off sexual harassment accusers for decades

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. 

Three very different stories illustrate the common -- and deepening -- fault line that news, sports, entertainment media and higher education are trying desperately to straddle.   Every word, every video clip, every invited speaker, every programming decision is viewed through the hyper-partisan lens of pro-Trump and anti-Trump activists.  On this week's episode of Views of the News we discuss Sean Spicer, Chelsea Manning and ESPN's Jemele Hill.  Plus a look at the new Ken Burns documentary on the Vietnam War.  

Inviting Spicer to the Emmys

CNN's Patrick Oppmann reports on Hurricane Irma from Cuba.
Courtesy CNN

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? 

The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests.  A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story.  Is there enough context?

The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why?

Angus Crawford, BBC: “Facebook failed to remove sexualised images of children

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

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Megyn Kelly says goodbye to Fox News

People who struggle with suicidal thoughts will often reach out to friends and family first. But when our social circle lives online these days, the biggest social media networks grapple with how to intervene and with getting users the right kind of help.

Facebook is the latest social media network to roll out support resources for suicide prevention. The company is now trying to combat suicide by doing what it does best — connecting friends.

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