feminism | KBIA

feminism

On this week's show, a look at the life of a pioneering female journalist. Fortuna Calvo-Roth was born in 1934 to a Jewish family in Paris, but was raised in Lima, Peru. There she fell in love with the news business during World War II - and came to admire American newspapers like the New York Times and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

So she left Peru and came to the Missouri School of Journalism in the 1950s, where she managed to graduate with honors at just age 19. Despite facing discrimination, she went on to a distinguished career as a correspondent for a number of major Latin American newspapers and later as news executive for the Brazilian publishing group Vision Inc.

Yet journalism was just one chapter of her career - she went on to enjoy success as a theatrical producer, a publisher and as the co-founder of an audiobook label.


AP Photo

In late June, the first Saudi women to legally drive a car in the kingdom started their engines and took off down the road.

The lifting of Saudi Arabia’s ban on female drivers was a step forward for women. But it’s just one of a number of recent steps forward for women’s rights in the Arab world. Countries like Tunisia, Jordan and Lebanon have passed laws ending legal loopholes that let rapists off the hook for marrying their victim.

Some countries have rolled back exemptions for those who commit so-called “honor killings” of female family members.

Still, many women’s rights advocates are only cautiously optimistic. In some countries, laws aimed at helping women aren’t enforced. Nor are public attitudes toward women’s rights necessarily becoming more progressive. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at women's rights in the Arab world.


Yann Forget/Wikimedia Commons

In the next decade, India may pass China to become the world’s most populous country.

But there’s something odd about India’s population. 

At its last census in 2011, India had 36 million more men than women. As the population grows, the World Bank predicts there will be 51 million more men by 2031.

This is due in part to the widespread practice of sex-selective abortion and the gender-based neglect of young girls leading to higher mortality rates. In some cases, 'infanticide' of newborn girls is still practiced. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss what some activists call a 'gendercide' against women.


AP Photo

Since France banned women from wearing veils that covered the face in public in 2011, a growing number of European nations have passed similar restrictions.

Belgium, Bulgaria and Austria have passed similar so-called "burqa bans," while Germany, Switzerland, Norway and other countries are considering such legislation.

The laws have sparked a public debate about religious freedom, feminism and xenophobia. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how Europe's courts, legislators and public are grappling with the debate about the meaning of Islamic dress in Western societies.


670 The Score

  Two Chicago sports radio personalities on 670 The Score caught some flak after a Twitter exchange of sexist comments went viral. A few weeks later, the station announced it hired Julie DiCaro to contribute sports blogs for the WSCR-AM and CBSChicago.com website. 

The Score acknowledged its need for female representation. 

The Future of Rolling Stone Discussed

Apr 11, 2015
Courtesy Rolling Stone

  A moment that will go down in journalism's history, the failure of Rolling Stone's article, "A Rape on Campus." Rolling Stone published its article last November, a story that depicted a brutal gang rape on University of Virginia student, "Jackie." The article resulted in a wave of controversy across the nation as factual errors began to arise. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on Views of the News and what's in store for Rolling Stone moving forward. 

 Sports radio talk personalities Dan Bernstein and Matt Speigel criticized Comcast sports sideline reporter Aiyana Cristal's on-air performance, but ended up focusing more on her body and not her work. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

 

Book talk: "Arab Women Rising" (rebroadcast)

Oct 30, 2014
arab-women
Ahmed AlFardan / NurPhoto/Sipa USA (Sipa via AP Images)

This episode originally aired in August 2014.  

For those who follow the video game industry and its community, feminist critic Anita Sarkeesian is a familiar figure. Her video series "Tropes vs Women in Video Games" analyzes how women are represented in games past and present.

Woman Right's Advocate Alumna Speaks at MU Women's Center

Sep 26, 2014
KBIA

 

Students learned just how much egalitarian progress MU has made since the 1970s yesterday. Woman’s right advocate Jeannette Pai-Espinosa spoke Thursday at the MU women’s center, which hadn’t even been built when she was a student.