freedom of expression | KBIA

freedom of expression

National Coalition Against Censorship

From the love poems of Ovid to Michelangelo’s nudes in the Sistine Chapel, art censorship has a long history.

Yet today’s censorship is taking some new forms. As Instagram has become one of the major vehicles for visual art, computer algorithms now play a role in deciding what is acceptable for public consumption. Meanwhile the use of anti-terrorism laws to stifle art expressing political dissent and the rise of populist political movements.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the current growth in censorship and the new ways that artistic freedom is being challenged.


European Pressphoto Agency

  Picture the most humiliating experience of your life. Now imagine that this awful moment was captured on video by someone else and posted online where anyone could access it just by Googling your name.

This scenario is reality for a growing number of people, and has given rise to the concept of a “Right to Be Forgotten” – the idea that individuals should have some measure of control over personal information or images of them on the internet.

Since 2014, the European Union has given this idea the force of law. Despite controversy over its implementation and concerns it will limit speech, other countries have adopted similar measures - and the debate has even reached the U.S.

  

EPA

Over the past two years, Tanzania's President John Magufuli has led what critics say is a broad assault on human rights, including freedom of expression.

His government has suspended the publication of newspapers that criticized him and attempted to silence critical bloggers and members of the opposition. It's even detained and interrogated researchers from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Also targeted: members of the East African nation's LGBT community, who have faced criminal prosecution and stepped-up intimidation.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Magufuli’s crackdown on civil liberties in Tanzania.