Ghana | KBIA

Ghana

Travis McMillen

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the news gets reported in some very different parts of the world.

We’ll talk to a journalist from Ghana about how politicians are undermining the credibility of the news media in the West African democracy.

In addition, as tensions between India and Pakistan are again spiking, we'll meet a Muslim journalist who describes the challenges of working in a country where Hindu nationalist sentiment continues to rise.

Finally, we'll speak to a journalist for a Hong Kong-based news organization about the challenges of reporting from Beijing.


AP Photo

It’s sometimes called “brown envelope” journalism. This is the practice of journalists taking money or gifts from companies, politicians, or even international charities to give them favorable coverage.

Payola has long been a problem in journalism in countries all around the world. Today it’s particularly a problem in developing nations, where journalists are sometimes paid just a few dollars a day with the understanding that they can supplement their income by taking money from those they write about.

But payola isn’t unique to the developing world. It remains an issue for journalists in the U.S. and other wealthy democratic nations - especially those who do business journalism or work that involves reviewing products and services.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the payola system operates both for journalists in Africa and those in U.S. business news.


European Pressphoto

On the surface, Ghana and Egypt couldn't be more different places when it comes free expression. Ghana ranks higher than the U.S. and U.K. by some measures of press freedom, while Egypt's government is now among the most repressive in the world. 

Yet Ghana's reputation for tolerance and press freedom has been challenged by the recent killing of Ahmed Hussein-Suale, an investigative journalist who worked on a high-profile probe of corruption in professional soccer.

Meanwhile, in Egypt journalists are facing renewed persecution by a government that brands dissenters as terrorists and leads the world in prosecuting reporters and bloggers for "fake news." 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at challenges to press freedom in Ghana and Egypt.