health and wealth | KBIA

health and wealth

Trevor Hook / KBIA

David “Racin’ Dave” Stevens has ridden a lot of motorcycles. “The name actually came from car racing days cruising the loop back in the ‘80s,” he said. He fixes a lot of them too. Stevems is a mechanic at Gilbane Motorsports in Columbia.

He has ridden a variety of bikes – motorcycles, dirt bikes, three-wheelers - for more than 45 years. And not always while wearing a helmet. “If I’m riding my bike into town, I’m not being stupid or unruly. I feel like I should have the choice of not wearing a helmet if I don’t want to,” Stevens said. Senate Bill 147 may give him that choice.

Henry Domke / Photo Provided

It was humid spring morning in the woods of central Missouri and Henry Domke was lining up a shot. His target? The vibrant petals of a red buckeye bloom.

"I want to level it. Make sure it’s really sharp," Domke said as he adjusted his tripod and focused in before snapping the photo. 

Domke — a retired family doctor — has been photographing the wildlife in his back yard for years. When he was a doctor, he decorated his practice with his photographs, and after he retired he started exhibiting his work.

 

Photo provided by Mat Reidhead

In 2017, the Missouri legislature expanded Medicaid managed-care organizations, or MCOs, state-wide, putting third-party contractors in charge of hundreds of thousands of patients. Advocates say managed care programs allow for more personalized care for patients and more predictable budgeting. But hospitals have criticized MCOs, saying they cover less and take longer to reimburse for care than traditional Medicaid.

Now, a new study from the Missouri Hospital Association suggests switching from traditional Medicaid to MCOs could be linked to increased risk of suicide in teens. Mat Reidhead is the Hospital Association's lead researcher.


Photo provided by Mei-Ling Wiedmeyer

The language barrier can cause  a lot of problems when it comes to refugees getting health care, but there are other obstacles as well.

Mei-Ling Wiedmeyer, a family physician who grew up in Columbia, but now works with refugees in Vancouver, Canada and is on the faculty of the North American Refugee Health Conference. She spoke with Health and Wealth about the other barriers to care, and how communities can get around them.


At a pediatric clinic in Kirksville, Missouri, a young boy is waiting in an exam room to be vaccinated. A nurse explains the shots to his mother, and Lisette Chibanvunya translates.

Chibanvunya is one of two Congolese interpreters the Northeast Health Council has hired to help the clinic care for refugees and immigrants from central Africa. She first came to town to study at Truman State University in 2013.

Chibanvunya says, "When I came I faced discrimination, because they didn’t have a lot of black people." But now, she says, "They start accepting people because they finally understand that people kind of decided to make it home." 

Self-screening for various forms of skin cancer is as easy as A-B-C-D-E. DR. KARA BRAUDIS, MU Health Care, takes us through the process step-by-step. If you'd rather have a professional do it (for free!), stop by Ellis Fischel Cancer Center next Thursday afternoon. Watch for details! Also, KBIA Health and Wealth Desk reporter REBECCA SMITH tells us how she's empowering rural Missourians to tell their own health-related stories, both the good and the bad, and the impact it's having on the medical community. (4:41) May 4, 2018

Michaela Tucker / KBIA

When a woman is trying to leave an abusive relationship or unsafe domestic situation, shelters offer a safe space for her to stay and get back on her feet. But leaving an abusive relationship can be difficult for any woman.

According to the National Domestic Abuse Hotline, a woman seeking help will be in and out of a shelter seven times on average, before leaving the relationship. For deaf individuals, that number doubles.


kids jumping
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The jumping jack is about to become Missouri's official state exercise.

Gov. Nixon signed legislation Thursday adding the jumping jack to a list of more than two dozen official symbols and things.

Every Friday, KBIA’s Health and Wealth Desk curates the week’s most interesting (or so we think) articles and reports on rural health, wealth and society issues.

Osteopathic Physicians: An Answer To Rural Health Care Needs?

It’s no secret the U.S. is facing a shortage of primary care physicians – especially in rural areas, which is home to some 20 percent of all Americans, but only has 9 percent of all physicians. Compared to specialized medicine such as surgery and cardiology, primary care does not pay as well – and the average student loan debt for med school graduates is $161,290. Only about 24 percent of MD graduates lean to primary care. That’s not the case with recent osteopathic medicine graduates, though.  

Ed Yourdon / Flickr

According to the latest U.S. Census Bureau data, 14 percent of people in Missouri live below the poverty line. That’s almost 900,000 Missourians. KBIA’s Harum Helmy finds out how one nonprofit organization attempts to educate the 86 percent about what it’s like to be on the other side.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Herculaneum, Mo., a small town on the bluffs above the Mississippi River, was always a company town.  The company, Doe Run, is the largest lead producer in North America, trucking in lead from Missouri's rich mines to a 120-year-old smelter on the river.  For 25 years, the smelter didn't meet federal air standards for lead, and now, after decades of battling government regulators and angry parents, Doe Run is leaving town at the end of next year.


Jacob Fenston / KBIA

As more and more children are diagnosed with autism, there's also a lot more research on the disorder.  Now, a new guidebook can help Missouri parents and people who work with kids on the autism spectrum sort through it all.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Initiatives that would cap payday loan interest rates, raise the Missouri minimum wage, and raise the state's tobacco tax are a step closer to the November ballot, after a Missouri Supreme Court ruling yesterday. The three initiatives were tied up for months in court – one judge struck down the payday petition, ruling the ballot summary was "likely to deceive petition signers." But yesterday, the Missouri Supreme Court upheld all three ballot summaries.

covermissouri.org

In Missouri, an estimated 835,000 people don't have health insurance – that's about 14 percent of the state's population. But in the next couple of years, that figure is going to change. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld most of the federal health care law, about half a million Missourians will join the rolls of the insured – either through Medicaid, the private insurance market, or with the help of subsidies provided by the federal government. The percentage of uninsured will drop to five percent of the population.

Missouri Medicaid expansion up in the air

Jul 4, 2012
whitehouse.gov

After last week's Supreme Court decision upholding most of the Affordable Care Act, President Obama declared victory. But there was one major gray cloud -- or silver lining, depending on your point of view -- leaving open the question of Missouri's participation in the expansion of Medicaid envisioned by the federal health care law.

KOMU News / Flikr

In 2011, Missouri law enforcement busted about five meth labs each day on average – almost double the number of any other state. The state spends more than $2 million dollars a year on cleanup of these labs, and millions more on incarceration, child care, and drug treatment.

Leah Shafer / Flikr

For the past decade, Missouri has claimed the dubious distinction of the most meth busts of any state in the nation. In this week's Health & Wealth update, reporter Kyle Deas has the first in a two-part-series on Missouri's unique meth addiction.

Pumkpins, melons and corn

May 30, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Columbia has lots of community gardens, and several school gardens. But school-community gardens? On Tuesday at Ridgewood Elementary, the school and community worked together to start planting the city's first community garden at a public school.

'Cocaine? No thanks!'

May 23, 2012
Boone County Courthouse
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Back in the late 1980s, while the nation was in the grips of the war on drugs, some courts started experimenting with alternative sentencing programs they hoped would be cheaper and more effective than incarceration.  This week, the most recent batch of offenders graduated from the Boone County drug court, which is seen as a national role-model.

7000 miles bicycling and banjo-ing against war

May 16, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Afghan war veteran Jacob George is a self-proclaimed hillbilly farmer from the Ouachita Mountains in Arkansas. After three tours as a combat engineer, he now spends his days bicycling around the country protesting U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan. He recently passed through Missouri on his way to protest the NATO summit taking place in Chicago next week.

Stories from prison: roar!

May 15, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  In Missouri state prisons, about 60 percent of inmates have kids. That's 18,000 moms and dads behind bars – and tens of thousands of kids on the other side. To help those parents and kids connect, volunteers make their way through the metal detectors at Missouri state prisons with big tubs of blank tapes and CDs, stamped envelopes, and lots of children's books. 

Long distance running, one state at a time

May 9, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Planning a road-trip this summer? In this week's Health & Wealth update, the best way to see the country might be to run across it.

If you tax them, they will quit

May 2, 2012
tobaccofreekids.org

You have probably heard the statistic: Missouri has the lowest cigarette tax in the nation – just 17 cents a pack, compared to the national average of $1.46. In this week's Health & Wealth update, public health advocates want to raise Missouri's tobacco tax to deter people from smoking, and to help offset the costs that tobacco incurs.

Three interviews on health disparities

Apr 30, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

At the health equity conference in Columbia last week, between the steady stream of PowerPoints and pie charts, I had the chance to talk with some smart folks who spend their time thinking about health disparities and how to end them:

Contraception debate moves to the Missouri House

Apr 25, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Debate continues in the Missouri legislature over the Obama administration's "contraception mandate," which will require health insurance to include coverage for birth control. In this week's Health & Wealth update, a House committee hears testimony on a largely symbolic bill, opposing the mandate.

Rising autism rate means more parents getting help

Apr 4, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

According to the latest estimate from the Centers for Disease Control, 1 in 88 children in the United States has autism, almost double the rate ten years ago. In this week's Health & Wealth update, while more children are being diagnosed with the disorder, more parents are getting the help they need to treat it.

Payday loans: credit option or debt trap?

Apr 3, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri is fertile ground for payday lenders. With some of the loosest regulations in the nation, we are among the states with the most payday lending stores per capita. In this Health & Wealth report, the payday lending industry in Missouri fights for its life, as activists aim for the November ballot to try to rein in these lenders they say trap the working poor in a cycle of debt.

Missouri awaits Supreme Court ruling on health reform

Mar 28, 2012
David Sachs / SEIU

Health care reform is in the cross-hairs at the U.S. Supreme Court this week. In this Health & Wealth update, as the nine justices hear oral arguments on Obama's 2010 health reform, implementation of some aspects of the law are on hold in Missouri.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Sixty-two percent of working-age women have jobs, but they still earn just 74 cents on the dollar, compared to men. But that disparity varies by region; in some rural counties, women earn fully half what men do. In this week's Health & Wealth update, a new report on how women in Missouri are faring in health, work, education, and civic engagement. With a state legislature that's three-quarters men, will lawmakers do anything about the disparities?

Politicians tussle over health care for the blind

Mar 14, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Governor Jay Nixon told reporters yesterday that lawmakers in Jefferson City are trying to balance the state budget on the backs of some of the state's neediest: poor blind people. But members of the House budget committee said cuts to health care for blind Missourians are necessary to pay for higher education, which the governor wants to trim. 

Pages