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Long lines of job seekers queuing around booths
Vincent Yu / AP

A new coronavirus emerging out of Asia, striking panic with the suddenness of its onset, the ease of its spread and the virulence of its impact.

Sound familiar?

In 2003, the coronavirus caused SARS, sudden acute respiratory syndrome. This from-the-vault episode of Global Journalist features a conversation with reporters who back then were on the ground at SARS infection hotspots: Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong and Toronto.

We're re-airing the program now because we think it raises some interesting questions: What stopped the SARS epidemic? And are there lessons we should have learned then that might have spared us some of the pain we're experiencing now? 


AP Photo

Hong Kong’s six-month old protest movement has been one of the biggest international stories of 2019. What began in June as a protest against a bill that would allow for the extradition of criminal suspects to mainland China has turned into a full-blown democracy campaign. 

But it hasn't been an easy story for journalists to cover. Over the past six months journalists have been hit by tear gas, projectiles and pepper spray by the police - and reporters from pro-Beijing news outlets have been attacked by pro-democracy protesters.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Hong Kong's protest movement through the eyes of the journalists on the ground. 


Travis McMillen

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the news gets reported in some very different parts of the world.

We’ll talk to a journalist from Ghana about how politicians are undermining the credibility of the news media in the West African democracy.

In addition, as tensions between India and Pakistan are again spiking, we'll meet a Muslim journalist who describes the challenges of working in a country where Hindu nationalist sentiment continues to rise.

Finally, we'll speak to a journalist for a Hong Kong-based news organization about the challenges of reporting from Beijing.


EPA

Homosexuality may not be illegal in China, but LGBT people in the world's most populous country often live their lives in the shadows.

By one estimate, as many as 80 percent of the country's 20 million gay men marry women due to social pressure. The phenomenon is so common it has its own word in Mandarin, "tongqi," or "gay man's wife." But the views of LGBT people are changing, particularly in China's biggest cities. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how Chinese views of gay rights are evolving.

AP

For more than two decades, China has moved from strength to strength. Its economic miracle has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty and dramatically increased the nation's global influence.

But recently China's growth has hit a major speed bump, weakening the Communist Party's major rationale for one-party rule . Meanwhile China faces new challenges in Hong Kong, Taiwan and the South China Sea. 

On this week's Global Journalist, a look at the leadership of President Xi Jinping and how China's greater place in the world has led to greater domestic and international challenges.


What's happening in Hong Kong?

Oct 2, 2014
hong kong protests
Wong Maye-E / AP Photo

On this week's show, we are looking at the protests in Hong Kong that have attracted worldwide attention. Students and citizens alike have been protesting China's decision to manage the region's 2017 general election. Back in the 1980s, the United Kingdom and China negotiated a treaty that ceded Hong Kong back to China. According to that treaty, the people who run Hong Kong's government are, eventually, to be selected through universal suffrage. In 2007, it was decided that the 2017 election would be the first to meet that criteria. Protesters say that what China has proposed, though, falls far short of universal suffrage. China wants to pre-select candidates for Hong Kong's government based on guidelines it sets, instead of allowing any candidate run for any position. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the protests and the situation in Hong Kong, and what it could mean for the region's future. 

Updated at 8:30 a.m. ET

Hong Kong leader Leung Chun-ying is appealing to pro-democracy demonstrators who've brought parts of the Asian financial hub to a standstill in recent days to halt their campaign "immediately" because, he says, Beijing won't accede to their demands. But protesters have promised to announce a new phase of civil disobedience if reforms aren't forthcoming.

Thousands of pro-democracy protesters, wearing surgical masks and holding umbrellas to ward off tear gas lobbed by police, have continued to throng Hong Kong's Central business district and other areas of the city, calling on Beijing to make good on a promise to allow the former British colony to choose its next leader.

Organized mainly by a group calling itself "Occupy Central," the mass protest and the police pushback is being described as the worst unrest in the southern Chinese business hub since it was handed back to China in 1997.