Jamie Grey

Emmy host Stephen Colbert invites former White House press secretary Sean Spicer to appear on stage at last Sunday's ceremony. Who wasn't in on the joke? Was Harvard "behaving stupidly" when it rescinded an invitation to Chelsea Manning to become a visiting fellow? Also, reactions by ESPN management after Jemele Hill speaks out against #Trump; and will Ken Burns' latest documentary about the #VietnamWar attract an audience beyond the baby boomers who lived through it? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey. KBIA 91.3 FM

Actor Charlie Sheen speaks out, telling Today Show anchor Matt Lauer he is HIV positive. The diagnosis came years ago, but Sheen said he’s speaking now to ease the stigma… and to put a stop to blackmail attempts from those threating to make the information public. Also, Mizzou makes more headlines, Geraldo Rivera’s reunion with his daughter following the Paris terror attacks, and extending the copyright on The Diary of Anne Frank. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Joella Marano

Actor Charlie Sheen revealed he is HIV positive during an appearance on the Today Show on Tuesday. He told Matt Lauer he was speaking out now to try and end a smear campaign against him... and to end the stigma associated with the virus. 

Eun Kyung Kim, TODAY: “Charlie Sheen reveals he’s HIV positive in TODAY Show exclusive

  Is any publicity good publicity for Donald Trump?  He’s certainly testing that proposition with his attack on John McCain’s war record.  And some say the media are depriving more serious presidential contenders of oxygen by focusing so much on the real estate mogul and reality TV star.  Amateur drones are getting in the way of California firefighters.  The publisher of the celebrity gossip site Gawker pulls a salacious story, prompting two of his editors to quit.  Critics accuse journalists of being too quick to blame sexism for the resignation of Reddit’s CEO.  And Harper Lee’s new novel raises some difficult questions for reviewers.  It’s Views of the News with Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Lynda Kraxberger and Jamie Grey.

  A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. Also, how an Arkansas judge’s alternative sentencing stands to affect one television station’s editorial product, why Glenn Greenwald says a story in the Sunday Times is “the opposite of journalism,” and the experiment to drive home the importance of mobile at the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

Courtesy KXLY-TV

A week ago, few outside Spokane, Wash. knew Rachel Dolezal. Today, she’s a household name, thanks to one reporter’s persistent line of questioning. What is it like to ask questions of someone when you know it'll likely change the course of their life forever? Has the media been fair to Rachel Dolezal, her experience and her story?

Jeff Humphrey, KXLY: "First on KXLY: Rachel Dolezal responds to race allegations"

Fox News Channel scored huge ratings with last week’s exclusive interview with members of the Duggar family. Megyn Kelly promised to ask the tough questions. Did she? Did the Duggars do anything to help themselves in the court of public opinion? Also, how the gender gap affects the quality of news reporting, the next steps at Gawker Media now that employees agree to union representation, and an NPR/ProPublica follows Red Cross spending in Haiti. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.


Courtesy Fox News Channel

Members of the Duggar family appeared on Fox News Channel's The Kelly File to to talk about the abuse allegations against the oldest child, Josh. Jessa Duggar Seewald and Jill Duggar Dillard told Megyn Kelly they are two of their brother's victims. But, they said, they've long forgiven him. Instead, they say, it the media violated them and privacy laws were broken in the process.

Remembering David Carr

Feb 21, 2015
Web Summit

Last week was a tough week in our industry. NBC suspended Brian Williams, Jon Stewart stepped down from The Daily Show, Bob Simon from "60 Minutes" died in a car crash, and New York Times media columnist David Carr died of lung cancer. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jaime Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

Carr was not afraid to challenge the establishment. Perry mentioned that he was a man that told people where they could do better and wonders if there will ever be someone like him again. 


FAA Proposes New Drone Rules

Feb 19, 2015
Luke Runyon

The FAA recently proposed new regulations for the use of unmanned aircraft over U.S. airspace -- and it looks like it could be promising for drone journalism. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

This will not only be useful for broadcast and photojournalism, but as Perry said, it will be good for strategic communication, advertising, public relations, science, and agriculture.

  The past week was a shock for many journalists: the sudden deaths of CBS correspondent Bob Simon and New York Times media columnist David Carr, the fallout from Brian Williams suspension and Jon Stewart’s impending departure from “The Daily Show.” What have we lost and what will we most remember? Also, clues from the FAA on how it will regulate the use of drones, why we still televise car chases live, and 40 years of “Saturday Night Live.” From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.


This was a week that was hard on many in the media world, with the sudden deaths of both David Carr and Bob Simon, the suspension of Brian Williams, and word that Jon Stewart would be leaving "The Daily Show."

Former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein told CNN's Brian Stelter that these four stories all tie together, as we come together to strive to tell the best version of the truth.

Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

The French publication Charlie Hebdo has a long history of publishing controversial cartoons. But after an attack on its offices that left 10 staff and two police officers dead, news organizations are grappling with the ethics of reprinting those same cartoons. The graphic depictions may provide relevant context, yet are deeply offensive to many of the Muslim faith. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the publication on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."


It was a big night for the cast and crew of both Boyhood and the Amazon series Transparent, as each walked away with two Golden Globe awards Sunday. The CW Network received its first Golden Globe for Gina Rodriguez's performance in Jane the Virgin. Yet with only one award given to the major broadcast networks,  ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox were left out in the cold. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the Golden Globes and the future of television on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

It’s been more than a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out its first edition, again with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover.  Who is republishing the cartoons? Who isn’t? Is it possible to give this story context without using it? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Valentina Cala

It's been a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out is first edition since the January 7, 2015 shooting that left 12 dead.  On its cover: another cartoon showing the image of the Prophet Mohammed.  What message are editors trying to send?

  Jake Gyllenhaal's character in the new movie 'Nightcrawler,' makes a name for himself shooting videos of crime scenes and selling them to news channels...but how much of that happens in real life? Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

glenn beck
The Blaze

Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck told fans that for the past few years, he’s been suffering from a mysterious neurological illness. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.


#Pointergate

Nov 13, 2014

KSTP-TV accused the Minneapolis Mayor of throwing up gang signs after she was photographed with a black constituent. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    

 President Barack Obama challenges the FCC to regulate the internet service providers as it would a utility.  A win for net neutrality advocates and businesses such as Netflix and Hulu or a long-shot wish put upon an independent agency? Conservative talk show host Glenn Beck reveals he is suffering from a rare illness that has “quite honestly, made me look crazy.” Stephen Glass breaks his silence. And, how close to reality is Jake Gyllenhaal’s new flim Nightcrawler? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jim Flink and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.

 

Wikimedia Commons / wikimedia commons

President Barack Obama told the FCC he thinks it's time the independent agency acts on net neutrality, and regulate the Internet and service providers like other utilities.  It's uncertain how the FCC will act -- but Obama's request is being viewed as a "win" for consumers and businesses such as Netflix and Hulu and a blow to big telecom companies like Comcast and Verizon.

Matthew Yglesias, Vox: “Obama says FCC should reclassify the Internet’s regulatory status