medical ethics | KBIA

medical ethics

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On this edition of Global Journalist, the second in our two-part series on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. For this installment, our focus shifts to North America, where Canada legalized physician-assisted suicide in 2016 after a contentious debate.

Meanwhile in the U.S., a number of state legislatures are considering joining the District of Columbia and seven other states that have legalized the practice.

Former NPR talk show host Diane Rehm, New York Times' reporter Catherine Porter and Catholic bioethicist Moira McQueen weigh-in on the debate.


(Photo: FilmMoment/Jesse van Venrooij)

In the first of a two-part series on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, Global Journalist examines the issue in the Netherlands – the first country to legalize euthanasia.

Over the past decade the number of Dutch choosing to have a doctor end their lives voluntarily has climbed to nearly 7,000 per year, or about 4 percent of all deaths in the country.

This includes physically healthy people with dementia and psychological disorders that haven’t responded to treatment. Though euthanasia retains broad public support in the country, as the range of people eligible has expanded, so too has criticism of the process in which it’s carried out.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the Dutch experience and what lessons it holds for other countries grappling with physician-assisted suicide.


European Press Agency

The imbalance between the supply of organs for transplant and the demand for them can be staggering.

There are about 75,000 people active on the U.S. waiting list for kidneys, livers and other transplantable organs. On average, 20 of them die each day.

And globally, the situation is much worse.

The international shortage of transplantable organs has lead to a booming underground industry known as the "Red Market,” where people illegally buy and sell human body parts to the highest bidder.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the donor shortage has fueled a lucrative underground market, and how efforts to stifle it are shaping international policy.

At 44-years-old Dave Adox was facing the end of his two year battle with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. He needed a ventilator to breathe and couldn’t move any part of his body, except his eyes. Once he started to struggle with his eyes – his only way to communicate – Adox decided it was time to die.