#MeToo | KBIA

#MeToo

Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford
Fox News

Psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford says she wanted to remain anonymous when she told her Congresswoman and U.S. Senator this summer that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her at a party while both of them were in high school.  But her name leaked.  And Ford's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee next Monday could make or break Kavanaugh's elevation to the nation's highest court.

AP Photo

The #MeToo movement has spread from the United States to other parts of the world as women have increasingly spoken out about sexual assault and sexual harassment.

One country where it has struggled is Japan, where discussions about sexual harassment and sexual assault remain highly taboo.

Japanese women are much less likely than their U.S. counterparts to describe non-consensual sex as rape. Further, women who publicly accuse their attackers often face significant public backlash. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the conversation around the #MeToo movement in Japan, a country known for its technological and economic prowess but that lags behind many other industrialized countries in measures of gender equity.


via Flickr user www.quotecatalog.com

Who’s really at fault? Cambridge Analytica, Facebook, or the millions of users around the globe who relied on a social platform to keep their data safe and protected? As Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is called before lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. to answer to data breaches affecting more than 50 million users, it’s a fair question to ask. When the product is free, are you the product?