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Mexico

A protest march down a city street led by a group of people carrying a large banner reading "Justicia para Regina Martinez"
Felix Marquez / AP

Once cut-throat competitors, journalists are now more frequently working together — often across borders — to investigate social problems that authorities either can't or won't tackle. 

All too often, these stories involve the murders of reporters. 

Global Journalist talked to founders of several ambitious collaborative journalism efforts about what got them started and how they keep going.


Presidential ballot showing the names of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris and Donald Trump and Michael Pence
Ted Warren / AP

Americans aren't the only ones awaiting the results of this year's U.S. presidential election with intense interest.

Missouri School of Journalism students in Professor Beverly Horvit's International Reporting class interviewed journalists from all over the world about who people in their countries like in the 2020 campaign and why.

The reporters know the U.S. well: They've all spent time here as Alfred Friendly or Hubert Humphrey fellows. 

AP Photo

Once a refuge for foreign journalists fleeing repression at home, the U.S. risks losing that status.

Like other migrants, journalists who come to the U.S. seeking safety are much more likely to wind up in prisons or federal detention centers - sometimes for months - as their immigratiom cases are considered. Their claims are also being heard by immigration courts that are much more likely to deny asylum requests than they were even a few years ago.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the stories of a Cuban journalist and a Mexican journalist who both found themselves locked up in a country they hoped would provide safety. 


AP Photo

All around the world, the local news organizations that report on municipal and regional governments are in decline. 

In the first installment of a special series with the Index on Censorship magazine, a look at news deserts in the U.S., silent zones in Mexico and a poll measuring the confidence of British journalists in their ability to hold the powerful to account. We'll also get a closer view at what the disappearance of local journalists means for democracy and accountability in government.


Christine Blasey Ford was 100 percent certain Judge Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school. Kavanaugh was 100 percent certain he didn’t.

But one figure that jumped out during Kavanaugh's recent U.S. Supreme Court confirmation hearings was this: 23 percent. That’s the percentage of women in the U.S. Senate, the body that voted to narrowly confirm him. Indeed the U.S. ranks 103rd in the world in the share of women in national legislatures – behind countries like Saudi Arabia, Venezuela and Iraq.

One major reason why is that more than 60 countries have passed quota laws for female candidates in the past 30 years. In many others nations, political parties have adopted voluntary quotas for women.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at gender quotas in international politics and whether they've worked as intended.


AP Photo

On this edition, part two of our look at press freedom and how journalists do their jobs in countries where just reporting the news can be a big challenge.

For this, we'll talk to a reporter working in Mexico - where cartel violence has made the U.S. neighbor the deadliest country in the world for journalists. We'll also talk to a reporter working in Macedonia, a country that once had an open climate for free expression but that has backslid dramatically over the past decade.

Both guests are visiting the U.S. on fellowships through the Alfred Friendly Press Partners.


Missouri Governor Willing to Send Troops to Border

Apr 6, 2018

Gov. Eric Greitens is willing to send National Guard troops to the Mexican border if asked by President Donald Trump.

AP Photo

Earlier this year, a 51-year-old Mexican man named Isidro Baldenegro López was shot to death in Mexico’s Chihuahua state.

Mr. López was a well-known environmental activist and advocate for the indigenous Tarahumara people. For years he had campaigned against the deforestation of old growth pine-oak forests in the Sierra Madre range - even winning the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize in 2005.

Unfortunately it’s just one of a large and growing number of cases of environmental activists slain in Latin America.

Kit Bond Speaking
File Photo / KBIA

Former U.S. Sen. Kit Bond of Missouri is selling the home that was his primary base during his long political career.

Val Vennet / Google Images

Operations have been shut down at a central Missouri plant that makes materials used in fracking.

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

We're covering two issues on this edition of Global Journalist.

First, Jason McLure interviews Saw Yan Naing (@yannaingsaw), a journalist from Myanmar. He's in the United States as part of the Alfred Friendly Fellowship Program, which creates partnerships between American media outlets and journalists from around the world.

Sayyid Azim / AP

You see the label on coffee, chocolate, t-shirts and even gold, “Fair Trade.” The extra dollars you pay for the products are meant to guarantee they’re produced ethically and sustainably. And that the farmers and workers who produced them are justly compensated. What began as a humble effort by a few churches and activists a half a century ago to help people in the developing world has grown into a multibillion dollar industry. But the movement has attracted critics, who say the label today is mostly marketing that benefits companies in Europe and the U.S.

Matilde Campodonico / AP

This summer, the United States Supreme Court will make a decision on whether to legalize same-sex marriage. But some countries in Latin America have already done that, with Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay being three that have made gay marriage legal. In this edition of Global Journalist, we look at gay rights in the region, and how some countries are actually going backwards in terms of gay rights.

This week's guests:

Daniela Vidal and Jacqueline LeBlanc / KBIA

  You might not expect to find too much of Mexico in Missouri. But small towns across the state, like Mexico, Missouri are adapting to a growing Latino population.

The last census reported the state of Missouri saw a nearly 80 percent increase in the Latino population from 2000 to 2010.

So it’s no surprise to hear conversations in Spanish when you step into Diva 27, a Mexican grocery and clothing store in Mexico.  Boxes of tortillas, fresh sweet bread, spices and figurines of famous Mexican comedians line the shelves.

Mexico Teacher to Accept Award at State Capital

Mar 3, 2015
Mexico Missouri Chamber of Commerce

The Missouri Alliance for Arts Education will present Mexico High School speech and theater teacher Sara Given with the Creativity and Innovation in Teaching award. Given will be recognized for creating the first ever Jellybean Speech Olympics competition.

After Iguala, what's next for Mexico?

Dec 4, 2014
mexico-protest
Eduardo Verdugo / AP Photo

Earlier this year, you may have heard of an incident in a small city in Mexico, where a group of 43 teaching students disappeared. The men who vanished in September were studying at a rural college called Ayotzinapa Normal School. On September 26, more than 100 students from the school had been protesting teacher hiring practices and funding for teachers’ colleges in the nearby city of Iguala. This week on Global Journalist, we look at the investigation, and what effect the disappearances have had in Mexico. Our guests:

The Mexican town of Tequila in the western state of Jalisco is the heart of a region that produces the legendary spirit. Any bottle of tequila must be made from the Weber Blue species of agave, grown and distilled in this region.

Field after field of agave gives this land a blue hue, defining an economy and its traditions.

Impunity prevails in Mexico's drug war

Sep 19, 2013
Associated Press

Covering crime and corruption in Mexico may be the most dangerous job in the world of journalism. On average, 10 journalists have been killed every year since 2006. And attacks on the media have increased since a new president took office nine months ago.

Officials have identified an employee who died in an accident at one of Home Depot's subsidiaries in central Missouri.

Brice Mesko, an assistant safety director in Mexico, Mo., says 30-year-old Kenny Baker of Auxvasse died Tuesday while trying to repair a loading dock plate at Home Decorators, a distribution center.

Alexandre Meneghini / AP Images

A new president is about to take power in Mexico amid a raging drug war. The biggest question facing Enrique Pena Nieto is this: what will the federal government do to curtail the gangland violence?

Conversations about reestablishing service on the 27-mile rail line between Mexico and Fulton have been ongoing for the past decade. The line has been out of service since the late 1990’s when it failed to generate enough business to stay running. In 2007 the project became more feasible when new owner Mike Williams showed an interest in developing the line. President of the Fulton Area Development Corporation Bruce Hackmann says progress has been made but many details of the project remain unsolved.

Marshall Griffin / KWMU

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Thousands gathering for rallies in Jefferson City
  • A jobs announcement in Mexico, MO
  • The stealth bombers at a Missouri Air Force Base are getting some expensive updates

Mexico auto parts manufacturer plans to add jobs

Mar 27, 2012
Addison Walton / KBIA

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon was in Mexico Tuesday to announce more job creation in the state.

Mexico ambulance service postponed

Mar 23, 2012
PMC1stPix / flickr

An ambulance service in Mexico has halted construction on a new building because of what it is calling unfit infrastructure.  

Military Academy names new president

Mar 16, 2012
Missouri Military Academy

The Missouri Military Academy in Mexico, Mo. has a new president. The school’s board of directors named Tony McGeorge to the position, and he will begin the job in July.

Mexico’s DREAM Initiative is continuing to make a difference in the downtown community.