Mike McKean | KBIA

Mike McKean

Tom Brokaw has apologized for his comments about Spanish speakers and #assimilation made on Meet the Press on Sunday. But that apology has raised more questions than answers. Also, conservative commentators criticize President #Trump, saying he caved, working with Democrats to end the government #shutdown, and more than 1,000 #journalism jobs lost in a week. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Tom Brokaw has apologized for his comments about Hispanics and assimilation made on Meet the Press on Sunday. But that apology has raised more questions than answers.

Viral videos often make news, but what happens when they don’t tell the whole story? What can we learn from what happened on the National Mall this weekend between a high school student and Native American elder? Also, BuzzFeed challenged on its bombshell report about #Trump and Cohen, the effects the true crime genre has on the loved ones of crime victims, and the dark side of social media memes. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Viral videos often make news, but what happens when they don’t tell the whole story? What can we learn from what happened on the National Mall this weekend between a high school student and Native American elder?

Bird scooters has been making news in Columbia for months. Now, it's making headlines around the world for its claim of a copyright violation by a tech news website. Was it a fair claim? Also, hedge fund owners make a play for one of the largest newspaper publishers in the U.S., NBC News formally cuts ties with Megyn Kelly and how Stephen King helped scare up subscribers of his local news website. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Mitch Legan / KBIA

Bird Scooters has been making news in Columbia for months. Now, its making headlines around the world for its claim of a copyright violation by a tech news website. Was it a fair claim?

Punny, yes. Funny? No. The closing of the Uranus Examinerpresents a serious problem for the residents of Pulaski County now that its lost its only locally-produced newspaper. Also, hyperlocal coverage of Prof. George Smith’s Nobel PrizeTIME Magazine’s Person of the Year and the controversy over the lyrics in 1940’s-era #Christmas music. From Missouri School of Journalismi professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Punny, yes. Funny? No. The closing of the Uranus Examiner presents a serious problem for the residents of Pulaski County now that its lost its only locally-produced newspaper.

A bombshell report from the Miami Herald revealed U.S. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta negotiated a plea deal during his time as a federal prosecutor to cover up an underage sex ring. How did the story come together? And, what effect might it have on his place in President Donald Trump’s cabinet? Also, remembering George H.W. Bush, the end of Mic, and a high school newspaper suspended following an investigation on varsity football player transfers. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Turn on cable news. What do you see… right now? Chances are it’s not coverage of the record-setting wildfires burning entire cities in California to the ground. Hundreds have died and thousands are homeless, it’s not getting the level of media coverage we’ve come to expect for east coast weather disasters such as hurricanes and nor’easters. Why not? Also, a deeper look at that Vogue travel writer’s words about Kansas City, Missouri, whether it’s time for Mark Zuckerberg to step down as Facebook’s CEO and the new Fox News streaming video app, Fox Nation. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

via California National Guard

Turn on cable news. What do you see… right now? Chances are it’s not coverage of the record-setting wildfires burning entire cities in California to the ground. Hundreds have died and thousands are homeless, it’s not getting the level of media coverage we’ve come to expect for east coast weather disasters such as hurricanes and nor’easters. Why not?

CNN has filed a federal lawsuit against President Donald J Trumpand several aides, fighting to have White House Correspondent Jim Acosta’s press credential reinstated. How have other reporters fared in the past, suing the president for access? Also, destructive protests outside Tucker Carlson’s home, an experiment that replaces television anchors using artificial intelligence, and remembering Marvel Comics founder Stan Lee. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

CNN has filed a federal lawsuit against President Donald Trump and several aides, fighting to have White House Correspondent Jim Acosta’s press credential reinstated. How have other reporters fared in the past, suing the president for access?

The Views of the News team returns tomorrow at 6 p.m. Join Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry for a complete look at the coverage of today's election, from a local, state and national level. 

Details are slowly starting to emerge about what might have happened to journalist Jamal Khashoggi جمال خاشقجي inside the Saudi embassy in Istanbul. How aggressively is the #Trumpadministration really pressing for answers? And, how are news organizations changing their approach to working in Saudi Arabia. Also, President Donald J. Trump’s media tour, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s DNA test, and why polling guru Nate Silver says journalists aren’t likely to like what he sees. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Details are slowly starting to emerge about what might have happened to journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi embassy in Istanbul. How aggressively is the Trump administration really pressing for answers? And, how are news organizations changing their approach to working in Saudi Arabia.

Hatice Cengiz, New York Times: “My fiancé Jamal Khashoggi was a lonely patriot

If we don’t make some changes soon, we’re heading for ‘climate catastrophe.” That’s the message from a report from the United Nations this week. The headlines are hyperbolic, the reporting is there, but will it make people care? Also, a look back at the coverage of Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation, a local collaboration reports on #bullying in schools and what happened to Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi جمال خاشقجي. Did he die in the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

via Flickr user Michael Mueller

If we don’t make some changes soon, we’re heading for ‘climate catastrophe.” That’s the message from a report from the United Nations this week. The headlines are hyperbolic, the reporting is there, but will it make people care?

It’s been almost a week since Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. We’ll talk about what’s transpired since then, and how the national news media covered it. Also, California passes its own net neutrality law, much to the ire of the federal government, Led Zeppelin is back in court over ‘Stairway to Heaven’ and the sci-fit hit Black Mirror goes interactive, From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Thursday is shaping up to be the biggest news day of the year. In Washington, Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein meets face-to-face with President Donald Trump following a New York Times exclusive. How will journalists balance their coverage? Also, the sentencing of Bill Cosby, ‘Murphy Brown’ returns to the CBS primetime lineup and personalized playlists based on your DNA. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford
Fox News

Thursday is shaping up to potentially be the biggest news day of the year. In Washington, Judge Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein meets face-to-face with President Donald Trump following a New York Times exclusive.

CBS fires the head of 60 Minutes for threatening a reporter in a text message, not because he's been accused of #sexualharassment. Plus, a prominent researcher says news organizations need to do more to avoid being manipulated by extremists, The New York Times apologies to U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, and The Weather Channel's Mike Seidel is mocked for his Hurricane Florence performance. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

Kavanaugh accuser Christine Blasey Ford
Fox News

Psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford says she wanted to remain anonymous when she told her Congresswoman and U.S. Senator this summer that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her at a party while both of them were in high school.  But her name leaked.  And Ford's testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee next Monday could make or break Kavanaugh's elevation to the nation's highest court.

Why didn’t NBC run Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein story last summer when it could? Why did the network encourage him to find another outlet for the piece? It seems Farrow, his producer and the network’s chairman have different takes as to why. Who’s telling the truth? Also, two Reuters journalists are sentenced to a lengthy prison term for reporting in Myanmar, why the 30th anniversary “Just Do It” campaign is leading to Nike boycotts, and what the FCC chairman is saying about regulating social networks. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Damon Kiesow and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Why didn’t NBC run Ronan Farrow’s Harvey Weinstein story last summer when it could? Why did the network encourage him to find another outlet for the piece? It seems Farrow, his producer and the network’s chairman have different takes as to why.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program. Also, are the Google News search results rigged against President Trump? Why he seems to think so. And, the Kansas City Star’s new subscription model. Get ready sports fans, this one’s for you!  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The tributes and remembrances of Sen. John McCain continue to flow. His relationship with the media wasn’t always friendly, but it was one of cooperation and mutual respect. We’ll remember him on this week’s program.

Mary Papenfuss, Huffington Post: “NBC cuts to awkward ‘Talent’ scene after solemn McCain report

Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally? Also, President Trump’s reaction and the coverage of breaking news that came in threes, how a congressional candidate justified keeping reporters out of a meeting she opened to the public and ESPN’s effort to repair its relationship with the NFL. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Why did a Florida judge came down hard on the South Florida Sun Sentinel for publishing information it published about the Parkland school shooter that it obtained legally?

Who is unhinged? It’s the title of Omarosa Manigault-Newman’s new book and it’s got just about everyone – including the president – talking. We’ll talk about how the hype built up through the week and why it’s not really selling. Also, covering the white nationalist movement without fanning the flames, how Twitter will define “dehumanizing speech,” and a unified effort nationwide to publish editorials fighting the Trump administration’s claims of “fake news.” From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Pages