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Social media influencers have enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. From an industry that was virtually non-existent a decade ago, companies are projected to pay individuals $10 billion globally in 2020 to laud their products in social media posts.

This booming industry has led to a number of different concerns for regulators and for advertisers. The added scrutiny led the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to issue new guidelines for influencers in November.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the rise of the social media influencer industry and how it’s changing advertising.


AP Photo

From Chile to Haiti, massive anti-government protests have spiraled across Latin America in recent weeks.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at what's fueling discontent in Bolivia and Ecuador - and how the local media are being challenged in new ways.


AP Photo

  Everybody with a cell phone is a publisher these days. Maybe it's time we learn to be reporters.

The downside of the internet is that it has given propagandists and peddlers of disinformation easy access to a worldwide audience. No country is immune from the problem.

On this edition of Global Journalist hosted by Kathy Kiely, a look at efforts at efforts to fight disinformation, counter Russian propaganda and learn how some organizations are working to increase news literacy around the world. 

 


AP Photo

All around the world, the local news organizations that report on municipal and regional governments are in decline. 

In the first installment of a special series with the Index on Censorship magazine, a look at news deserts in the U.S., silent zones in Mexico and a poll measuring the confidence of British journalists in their ability to hold the powerful to account. We'll also get a closer view at what the disappearance of local journalists means for democracy and accountability in government.


The success of CNN spawned many 24-hour news networks - many started by governments hoping to shape global public opinion to their advantage.

That group includes China's state-owned English-language CGTN, which broadcasts to 30 million homes in the U.S.

As you might expect from a news channel owned by China’s government - it’s not the place to turn if you want news about top Communist officials enriching themselves or reporting on China’s widespread violations of human rights.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an extended look at the challenges and opportunities for CGTN as it tries to grow its U.S. audience. Joining the program is Mike Walter, a top news anchor at the channel and host of CGTN's "Full Frame."


AP Photo

It’s sometimes called “brown envelope” journalism. This is the practice of journalists taking money or gifts from companies, politicians, or even international charities to give them favorable coverage.

Payola has long been a problem in journalism in countries all around the world. Today it’s particularly a problem in developing nations, where journalists are sometimes paid just a few dollars a day with the understanding that they can supplement their income by taking money from those they write about.

But payola isn’t unique to the developing world. It remains an issue for journalists in the U.S. and other wealthy democratic nations - especially those who do business journalism or work that involves reviewing products and services.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how the payola system operates both for journalists in Africa and those in U.S. business news.


European Pressphoto Agency

Africa is home to the 10 fastest growing cities in the world. Over the next 25 years, the World Bank projects that the continent's urban population will double to 1 billion. 

Yet along with gleaming skyscrapers and shopping malls, African cities are feeling growing pains. More than half of the 4 million people in the Kenyan capital Nairobi live in slums, often without access to running water, electricity or sewage systems. Traffic in Nairobi and other booming cities has become nightmarish. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the huge planning and infrastructure challenges for African cities as they undergo one of the most rapid periods of urbanization in world history. Will tomorrow's African megacities be economic powerhouses or giant slums?


Dan Clark-USFWS/via AP

By now, you've probably heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch – a giant accumulation of trash in the Pacific Ocean that’s about twice the size of Texas.

According to a study published in the journal Nature last year, most all this oceanic garbage is plastic - about 1.6 trillion pieces of it. But the Great Pacific Garbage Patch isn’t unique. It's just one of five major garbage patches in the world’s oceans. And these garbage patches are just a fraction of the plastic that’s been dumped in our seas over the past several decades.

The spread of plastic across the world's oceans is taking a grim toll on marine life. Unfortunately the problem is only getting worse, with an estimated 8 million tons of plastic added to the oceans each year.

On this addition of Global Journalist, a look at the problem of marine plastic pollution and what might be done to halt it.


AP Photo

Cuba has long been one of the world’s least connected countries. Cubans weren’t allowed to buy personal computers until about a decade ago, and didn’t have access to the Internet until 2013.

But things are slowly changing in the Communist country. In December, the state telecom company launched the country’s first mobile internet network. At the end of March, the country’s government signed a deal with Google that could significantly boost speeds on the country’s painfully slow network. President Miguel Diaz-Canel even opened a Twitter account.

Still, Cubans face big challenges in accessing information about the outside world.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Cuba’s slow march in to the digital age and what it means for the government’s efforts to control access to news and information – as well as the independent journalists who try to provide it.


After being threatened by the Taliban, filmmaker Hassan Fazili was forced to flee Afghanistan. Like thousands of others, he and his family set out for Europe seeking safety and a stable life.

What follows is a two-year odyssey that Fazili, wife Fatima Hussaini, and their two daughters carefully documented on video with their phones. From negotiating with people smugglers to hiding in abandoned buildings and being beaten by Bulgarian nationalists, the new documentary "Midnight Traveler" highlights the cruelty and capriciousness of the European Union's asylum system – and a family's strength to persevere.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, a look at this remarkable new film and an extended interview with producer and writer Emelie Mahdavian.


AP

Australia's continued detention of about 1,000 refugees and asylum-seekers on two remote Pacific islands has garnered international criticism as details emerge of alarming rates of attempted suicide and poor medical care.

Yet many Australians see the island detention centers as a necessary deterrent to keep the country from being overrun by a tide of migrant boats from Indonesia.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the conditions for the hundreds of migrants who have spent years in Australian detention on Nauru and Manus and the debate about their fate in Australia.


European Pressphoto Agency

Later this year, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is set to become Israel’s longest-serving prime minister in its 71-year existence. To reach that mark, both he and his right-wing Likud party will need a strong showing in elections April 9.

Polls show that Netanyahu, who was prime minister for three years in the 1990s and has held the office since 2009, is locked in a close race with former general Benny Gantz and the opposition Blue and White alliance. 

But Netanyahu isn’t just fighting for his political life, he’s also fighting for his freedom. That’s because Israel’s attorney general has said he plans to indict Netanyahu on criminal charges stemming from three separate corruption investigations after the election. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, an in-depth look at the political legacy one of Israel’s most influential and polarizing leaders, and his prospects in a tight campaign.  


AP Photo

On this edition of Global Journalist, the second in our two-part series on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. For this installment, our focus shifts to North America, where Canada legalized physician-assisted suicide in 2016 after a contentious debate.

Meanwhile in the U.S., a number of state legislatures are considering joining the District of Columbia and seven other states that have legalized the practice.

Former NPR talk show host Diane Rehm, New York Times' reporter Catherine Porter and Catholic bioethicist Moira McQueen weigh-in on the debate.


There are now nearly twice as many Christians in the Global South as there are in Europe and North America. As Christianity's center of gravity has shifted - so too is the flow of missionaries.

Thousands of Christians from places like Brazil, Nigeria and South Korea - where Christianity was first brought by European and North American missionaries - are now traveling to Europe and North America seeking to convert the natives.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a discussion about the growing phenomenon of "reverse missionaries."


AP Photo

More people joined the Islamic State from former Soviet republics than from any other region outside the Middle East.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, a look at what drew so many fighters from Central Asia to fight with the terror group in Syria – and what may become of them and their families as those who survived try to return.

Joining the program is Noah Tucker, a senior editor at Radio Free Asia/Radio Liberty, who lead a months-long research and reporting project on the issue in hotspots of ISIS recruitment in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan.


European Pressphoto Agency

The the practice of outdoor defecation is a major cause of diarrheal diseases that kill about 2,200 children a day - more than die from HIV/AIDS, malaria or tuberculosis combined

As of 2015, an estimated 900 million people relieved themselves outside, according to the UN. More than half of them – around a half billion people – were in India.

In response, the Indian government launched what Bloomberg News called “the largest toilet-building campaign in human history.” According to government figures, this “Clean India” campaign has built more than 90 million new latrines and toilets in the past four years.

Still, despite the toilet boom, public health experts say there’s much to do to end the practice of open defecation - and the problem goes far beyond a shortage of latrines.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’ll examine the issue in India as well as Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s $20 billion campaign to end the problem by 2019.


AP Photo

Thousands of children have been used as soldiers in at least 18 countries around the world in the past two years.

For the children who survive, the trauma of war can have long-lasting impacts.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we’re going to hear about how two aid groups are trying to address this issue in South Sudan and Uganda. We'll also hear from two ex-child soldiers about how the trauma of fighting in wars shaped their lives.


Break Free/Creative Commons/Flickr

Climate change has brought more intense storms and worsening “king tides” that flood through homes and gardens in the low-lying Pacific island nation of Kiribati. Even more critically, the encroaching seas are threatening the country’s dwindling supplies of freshwater.

Island nations like Kiribati have been among those most damaged already by climate change - and their situation is likely to grow worse.

Nearly all of these emissions, of course, are generated in large countries thousands of miles away from Kiribati.

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss the challenges for island nations like Kiribati threatened by climate change - and the chances that its people will successfully adapt to them. 


AP Photo

Just over a year ago Myanmar security forces were wrapping up a massive offensive against the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority. 

In a matter of weeks, more than 720,000 Rohingya were forced to flee to neighboring Bangladesh in what the head of Myanmar’s military called a “clearance operation” in the country’s Rakhine State. A recent U.N. report has shed new light on what happened in Myanmar, and accused the military of murder, mass rape and torture. It also called for several of Myanmar's top generals to be prosecuted for genocide and crimes against humanity.  On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at whether the UN report may galvanize the international community to hold Myanmar's generals to account and what the prospects are for the 1 million Rohingya now living in refugee camps in Bangladesh.

AP Photo

Agreements with countries like Turkey, Sudan and Libya have helped the European Union dramatically cut the flow of migrants to the continent.

But some of these partnerships have generated controversy amid concerns that the Libyan and Sudanese forces helping Europe keep migrants away are involved in the illegal detention, torture and trafficking of asylum-seekers.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the costs and benefits of the EU's immigration policy and its efforts to stop would-be migrants hundreds of miles from Europe's borders.


AP Photo

Poland was once a model democracy in eastern Europe. Yet since 2015 when the populist Law and Justice party (PiS) won both the presidency and lower house of parliament, there have been big changes.

Law and Justice has sought to force out judges deemed unsympathetic, shunned refugees and chilled the independent press – while tapping into resentment of the country's political elite and the European Union. The moves have strained ties with the EU, which has begun a process that could lead to sanctions on Poland and even the loss of its voting rights in the European bloc.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the challenges for democracy in Poland.


European Pressphoto

The young nation of Eritrea is often referred to as the North Korea of Africa.

The country has jailed thousands of political prisoners, eliminated the independent press and forces much of the population into indefinite military service. Border guards sometimes ‘shoot to kill’ Eritreans fleeing the country.

But since a July peace agreement, with longtime adversary Ethiopia,  Eritreans are waiting to see if new contacts with the outside world will open up a closed state.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at Eritrea's moment of opportunity.

AP Photo

For many, witch trials may seem like a relic of early colonial America.  But in fact witch-hunting is still a feature of rural life today in many parts of the world.

One place where it's prevalent is India. On average, an Indian woman is killed every other day after being accused of witchcraft, according to government statistics. Many are tortured or publicly-humiliated before being burned, stabbed or beaten to death.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the practice of witch-hunts in India, and why the phenomenon isn't merely an outgrowth of superstition. 


(U.S. Air Force)

In early August, Vice President Mike Pence renewed a call by the Trump Administration for the U.S. military to create a “Space Force.”

The White House’s effort comes in response to advances by China, Russia and other countries in space. It also raises the question as to whether or not the move might accelerate the militarization of space.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at how militaries have and could operate outside our atmosphere - and what that may mean for the future of warfare.


(White House)

Saudi Arabia's 32-year-old crown prince has already shaken up both Saudi Arabia’s internal politics as well as its foreign relations.

Mohammad bin Salman has detained prominent members of the royal family and businessmen after accusing them of corruption. He’s lifted restrictions that barred women from driving or operating businesses. He’s outlined a bold plan to wean Saudi Arabia’s economy from oil dependence.

But bin Salman has also escalated Saudi Arabia’s war in neighboring Yemen, triggering one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises. He’s feuded with nearby Qatar and Lebanon and intensified Saudi Arabia’s rivalry with its historical foe, Iran. Even Canada hasn't escaped his wrath.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at a prince upending the politics of both Saudi Arabia and the Middle East. 


AP Photo

  In 1979 China's Communist Party implemented the “One-Child Policy” to slow the country’s population growth.

The policy was lifted in 2015, yet the effects of 36 years of strict population control will be felt for years to come. Today there are about 7.6 workers for every person over 65 in China. By 2050, fully 40 percent of the population could be over that age and the country is projected to have 100 million people 80 and over.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the emerging consequences of China's mass population control experiment.

Note: This program originally aired March 1, 2018

AP Photo

On this edition, part two of our look at press freedom and how journalists do their jobs in countries where just reporting the news can be a big challenge.

For this, we'll talk to a reporter working in Mexico - where cartel violence has made the U.S. neighbor the deadliest country in the world for journalists. We'll also talk to a reporter working in Macedonia, a country that once had an open climate for free expression but that has backslid dramatically over the past decade.

Both guests are visiting the U.S. on fellowships through the Alfred Friendly Press Partners.


AP Photo

In late June, the first Saudi women to legally drive a car in the kingdom started their engines and took off down the road.

The lifting of Saudi Arabia’s ban on female drivers was a step forward for women. But it’s just one of a number of recent steps forward for women’s rights in the Arab world.

Still, many women’s rights advocates are only cautiously optimistic. In some countries, laws aimed at helping women aren’t enforced. Nor are public attitudes toward women’s rights necessarily becoming more progressive.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at women’s rights in the Arab world.


Massive multiplayer online role playing games like "World of Warcraft" and "League of Legends" are wildly popular in China. 

But the popularity of online games has given rise to fears that the country has raised a generation of "internet addicts." One 2009 survey estimated there are 24 million young people addicted to the internet in the country. 

The concern spurred the opening of more than 300 internet addiction treatment centers - many of which resemble boot camps that use controversial techniques to try to cure patients. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at internet addiction in China. 

U.S. Marine Corps cameraman Miles Lagoze came home from Afghanistan with hours of footage of the conflict that the Pentagon would prefer the public doesn't see. 

In a new documentary that premiered at the True/False Film Festival, Lagoze strings together video taken by himself and other Marine videographers to present an unvarnished view of life for the troops. From Marines smoking hash to cursing over the body of a civilian they've mistakenly shot, Lagoze gives an unsettling portrait of America's longest-running war in its history. 

On this special edition of Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg interviews Lagoze about the war in Afghanistan and how life for soldiers there differs from public perceptions in the U.S. 


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