One-Child Policy | KBIA

One-Child Policy

Courtesy

Having a child renewed filmmaker Nanfu Wang's interest in China's one-child policy. In effect from 1979 to 2016, the restrictions on family size halted China's explosive population growth but have left the country with a rapidly aging population. 

From forced sterilizations and abortions to fines and propaganda campaigns, Wang examines how the policy was enforced in her new documentary, "One-Child Nation." The film won the grand jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival and recently screened at the True/False Film Festival in Missouri. 

On this special edition of Global Journalist, an in depth discussion between Wang and guest host Joshua Kranzberg about the film and the human legacy of a population control measure unmatched in history.


AP Photo

  In 1979 China's Communist Party implemented the “One-Child Policy” to slow the country’s population growth.

The policy was lifted in 2015, yet the effects of 36 years of strict population control will be felt for years to come. Today there are about 7.6 workers for every person over 65 in China. By 2050, fully 40 percent of the population could be over that age and the country is projected to have 100 million people 80 and over.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the emerging consequences of China's mass population control experiment.

Note: This program originally aired March 1, 2018

IISG via Flickr

In 1979 China's Communist Party implemented the “One-Child Policy” to slow the country’s population growth.

The policy was lifted in 2015, yet the effects of 36 years of strict population control will be felt for years to come. Today there are about 7.6 workers for every person over 65 in China. By 2050, fully 40 percent of the population could be over that age and the country is projected to have 100 million people 80 and over.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the emerging consequences of China's mass population control experiment.