opioid addiction | KBIA

opioid addiction

Sebastián Martínez Valdivia / KBIA

About 15 miles southwest of St. Louis, is Fenton City Park. It’s pretty unremarkable, with picnic shelters, softball fields, and flags waving gently from a memorial to fallen soldiers. It's also where Kevin Mullane sought refuge as he struggled with an opioid addiction.

"Anybody that knew Kevin knew he loved Fenton Park," Kevin's mother Kathi Arbini said, recounting how her song became increasingly isolated. Mullane turned to prescription opioids to deal with depression. He eventually started stealing medications from friends and family members, and doctor-shopping for more.

When President Trump declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency in late October, it triggered a regulatory change intended to make it easier for people to get care in places with provider shortages. This declaration allows for the prescribing  of addiction medicine virtually, without doctors ever seeing the patient in person. (The regulatory change is not fully implemented until the DEA issues further rules.)