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via Flickr user samchills

An editorial cartoon containing anti-Semitic tropes appeared in Thursday’s international editions of the New York Times. An internal investigation has led to some changes in newsroom policy, but no clear public explanation as to how it wound up in the paper in the first place. Do we deserve one? 

New York Times Opinion via Twitter: “We apologize…

Television #journalists found themselves speechless as #NotreDame burned. We’ll examine the coverage here and abroad. Also, another #PulitzerPrize announcement in the shadow of tragedy, juxtaposing coverage of the measles outbreak with talk of protections for #antivaxxers, and a list of the best journalism movies ever. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Monique Luisi: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

via Wikimedia user Remi Mathis

Television journalists found themselves speechless, trying to describe the pictures on their screens, showing the centuries old cathedral consumed by flames. Two days later, we’ll examine the coverage here and abroad.

Sebastian Martinez / KBIA

Political watch parties can produce moments of high drama, with supporters waiting anxiously for results to come in, and races going down to the wire.

But as KBIA’s Sebastián Martínez Valdivia found out, when a race is uncontested, the watch party can be a little different.

He visited last night’s watch party for Columbia 4th ward councilman Ian Thomas and filed this audio postcard. The postcard features the voices of Brendon Steenbergen, Ian Thomas, Karl Skala, and Leila Gassman. 


It might be the most cringeworthy video to go viral this year. Why did the news staff at WTOL-11 produce a #hypevideo for the Toledo Public Schools? And, how might it compromise the staff’s reporting efforts in the future? Also, Infowars host Alex Jones claims ‘pyschosis,’ changes to the Oscar rules, and reporting on allegations against former vice president Joe Biden. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Courtesy WTOL

It might be the most cringeworthy video to go viral this year. Why did the news staff at WTOL-TV produce a hype video for the Toledo Public Schools? And, how might it compromise the staff’s reporting efforts in the future?

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Missouri senators have passed legislation to make it harder to impeach top officials less than a year after the former governor resigned while facing potential impeachment.

Senators passed the proposed constitutional amendment 25-8 Thursday.

Gayle King’s interview with R. Kelly has been described as a master class for journalists. This week, an analysis of her questions, her body language, and the discussion the conversation created. Also, Facebook’s pivot to privacy, an Arkansas newspaper publisher sues over anti-BDS pledge, and the internet’s happiest day. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy CBS

Gayle King’s interview with R. Kelly has been described as a master class for journalists. This week, an analysis of her questions, her body language, and the discussion the conversation created.

The screening of ‘The Commons’ during the True/False Film Fest led to a lot of off-screen action as several students featured in the film challenged the filmmakers’ process. Was their work journalism? Or something else? Also, reaction to Leaving Neverland, reporting on a known hoax and why Google Canada is banning political advertising ahead of a federal election in that country.

From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The screening of ‘The Commons’ during the True/False Film Festival led to a lot of off-screen action as several students featured in the film challenged the filmmakers’ process. Was their work journalism? Or something else?

Journalists in Australia covered the sex abuse trial of Cardinal George Pell for months, not sharing word of his December conviction until this week. Why the gag order? And, why are more than 100 journalists facing potential jail time for contempt or their work? Also, updates in the cases of Jussie Smollett, R. Kelly and the Alabama publisher who wrote an editorial calling for the Ku Klux Klan to resume night rides and lynchings. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Wikipedia user Gavin Scott

Journalists in Australia covered the sex abuse trial of Cardinal George Pell for months, not sharing word of this December conviction until this week. Why the gag order? And, why are more than 100 journalists facing potential jail time for contempt or their work?

An Alabama #newspaper publisher ran an editorial suggesting the best way to stop Washington politicians from raising taxes is for the Ku Klux Klan to ‘ride again,’ suggesting lynching as a solution. He’s been given a chance to walk those statements back, and only doubled down on them. Also, rapid developments in the investigation into attack claims by ‘Empire’ star Jussie Smollett, how a governor’s State of the State address turned into a story about a dress and Sinclair Broadcast Group’s new Marquee Network. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Courtesy Democrat-Reporter

An Alabama newspaper publisher ran an editorial suggesting the best way to stop Washington politicians from raising taxes is for the Ku Klux Klan to ‘ride again,’ suggesting lynching as a solution. He’s been given a chance to walk those statements back, and only doubled down on them.

Word of The National Enquirer’s attempts to extort Amazon owner Jeff Bezos has led to criminal investigations and offered subtle hints about his attitude toward editorial control at the Washington Post. Also, Bob Costas on his dismissal from NBC’s Super Bowl broadcast, French journalists using a secret Facebook group to #cyberbully and harass women writers and claims of plagiarism against the former executive editor of The New York Times. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Kathy Kiely: Views of the News.

James Duncan Davidson/Flickr

Word of the National Enquirer’s attempts to extort Amazon owner Jeff Bezos has led to criminal investigations and offered subtle hints about his attitude toward editorial control at the Washington Post.

A tip from a “concerned citizen” has created a controversy around the governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Ralph Northam. Also, President #Trump discusses his take on ‘fake news’ with the publisher of The New York Times, why Snopes unfriended #Facebook and why coverage about a forthcoming cure for breast cancer might be too good to be true. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 


VCU Capital News Service

A tip from a “concerned citizen” has created a controversy around the governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, Ralph Northam.

Tom Brokaw has apologized for his comments about Spanish speakers and #assimilation made on Meet the Press on Sunday. But that apology has raised more questions than answers. Also, conservative commentators criticize President #Trump, saying he caved, working with Democrats to end the government #shutdown, and more than 1,000 #journalism jobs lost in a week. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Tom Brokaw has apologized for his comments about Hispanics and assimilation made on Meet the Press on Sunday. But that apology has raised more questions than answers.

Commentary: The Media and Politics

Jan 29, 2019

Earlier this month an op-ed in the New York Times entitled “Who Will Win the Internet?” caught my eye.  The author, Kara Swisher, did not begin by making the question a multiple choice quiz, and it’s a good thing, because in her column she left out the obvious correct answer: Russia.  She restricted the competition to domestic contestants and argued that the two primary combatants are President Trump and his followers and freshman Democratic Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her followers.  

Viral videos often make news, but what happens when they don’t tell the whole story? What can we learn from what happened on the National Mall this weekend between a high school student and Native American elder? Also, BuzzFeed challenged on its bombshell report about #Trump and Cohen, the effects the true crime genre has on the loved ones of crime victims, and the dark side of social media memes. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Viral videos often make news, but what happens when they don’t tell the whole story? What can we learn from what happened on the National Mall this weekend between a high school student and Native American elder?

Bird scooters has been making news in Columbia for months. Now, it's making headlines around the world for its claim of a copyright violation by a tech news website. Was it a fair claim? Also, hedge fund owners make a play for one of the largest newspaper publishers in the U.S., NBC News formally cuts ties with Megyn Kelly and how Stephen King helped scare up subscribers of his local news website. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Mitch Legan / KBIA

Bird Scooters has been making news in Columbia for months. Now, its making headlines around the world for its claim of a copyright violation by a tech news website. Was it a fair claim?

Commentary: The Realities of Clean Missouri

Jan 9, 2019

Missouri voters used to be in the news because we were the bellwether state for presidential elections.  For 100 years with one exception Missouri voted for the winner – until 2008.

Now we are in the news because we are a trending red state that votes for progressive ballot initiatives.  Republicans have super majorities in both houses of the state legislature, control all but one statewide office, including both Senate seats, and six of eight congressional seats.  Yet in 2018 voters defeated right-to-work, approved a state minimum wage, approved medical marijuana and passed the “Clean Missouri” amendment, strengthening ethics laws and changing the way state legislative districts are drawn.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Missouri has begun the move toward medical marijuana, naming an outgoing lawmaker to a leadership role and announcing the start of the process for those who want to grow, make or sell marijuana products.

Punny, yes. Funny? No. The closing of the Uranus Examinerpresents a serious problem for the residents of Pulaski County now that its lost its only locally-produced newspaper. Also, hyperlocal coverage of Prof. George Smith’s Nobel PrizeTIME Magazine’s Person of the Year and the controversy over the lyrics in 1940’s-era #Christmas music. From Missouri School of Journalismi professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. KBIA 91.3 FM

Punny, yes. Funny? No. The closing of the Uranus Examiner presents a serious problem for the residents of Pulaski County now that its lost its only locally-produced newspaper.

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