Qatar | KBIA

Qatar

(White House)

Saudi Arabia's 32-year-old crown prince has already shaken up both Saudi Arabia’s internal politics as well as its foreign relations.

Mohammad bin Salman has detained prominent members of the royal family and businessmen after accusing them of corruption. He’s lifted restrictions that barred women from driving or operating businesses. He’s outlined a bold plan to wean Saudi Arabia’s economy from oil dependence.

But bin Salman has also escalated Saudi Arabia’s war in neighboring Yemen, triggering one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises. He’s feuded with nearby Qatar and Lebanon and intensified Saudi Arabia’s rivalry with its historical foe, Iran. Even Canada hasn't escaped his wrath.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at a prince upending the politics of both Saudi Arabia and the Middle East. 


Associated Press

On the surface, the tiny Persian Gulf nation of Qatar has much in common with Saudi Arabia and the other monarchies of the Arabian peninsula. Hydro-carbons have made it enormously wealthy, and it’s conservative Muslim nation ruled by a hereditary monarchy.

That’s made the decision by Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt to launch a surprise economic and diplomatic blockade against Qatar this month all the more surprising.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the diplomatic conflict between Qatar and its neighbors over funding of militant Islamic groups, the Al-Jazeera news network and relations with Iran.


(Travis McMillen)

In a special edition of Global Journalist, al-Jazeera's Director General Mostefa Souag addresses controversies that have shadowed the award-winning, Qatar-based news network as it tries to grow its U.S. presence.

During an extended interview, Souag responds to questions about the network's independence from the Qatari government, perceptions of anti-Semitic and anti-American bias and its famous interviews with Osama bin Laden.


Travis McMillen

In a special edition of Global Journalist, al-Jazeera's top executive Mostefa Souag addresses controversies that have shadowed the award-winning news network as it tries to grow its U.S. presence. Souag responds to questions about the network's independence from the Qatari government, perceptions of anti-Semitic and anti-American bias and its famous interviews with Osama bin Laden.