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refugees

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Just over a year ago Myanmar security forces were wrapping up a massive offensive against the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority. 

In a matter of weeks, more than 720,000 Rohingya were forced to flee to neighboring Bangladesh in what the head of Myanmar’s military called a “clearance operation” in the country’s Rakhine State. A recent U.N. report has shed new light on what happened in Myanmar, and accused the military of murder, mass rape and torture. It also called for several of Myanmar's top generals to be prosecuted for genocide and crimes against humanity.  On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at whether the UN report may galvanize the international community to hold Myanmar's generals to account and what the prospects are for the 1 million Rohingya now living in refugee camps in Bangladesh.

AP Photo

Agreements with countries like Turkey, Sudan and Libya have helped the European Union dramatically cut the flow of migrants to the continent.

But some of these partnerships have generated controversy amid concerns that the Libyan and Sudanese forces helping Europe keep migrants away are involved in the illegal detention, torture and trafficking of asylum-seekers.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the costs and benefits of the EU's immigration policy and its efforts to stop would-be migrants hundreds of miles from Europe's borders.


AP Photo

North Korea has one of the worst human rights record in the world, but for women the situation is particularly acute. 

Sexual harassment and sexual assault are rarely punished, and many women who escape to neighboring China end up being trafficked into prostitution or sold as brides to Chinese men. 

Yet despite these challenges, North Korean women often have more economic freedoms than men. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at women's rights in North Korea. 


Nadeem Ramiydh, left, looks into the camera and is wearing black glasses and a bright blue polo shirt. Sawsan Hasan, right, is wearing a white headscarf, a blue jacket and a bright, multi-colored floral scarf around her neck.
Rebecca Smith / KBIA

Sawsan Hasan and Nadeem Ramiydh both work for the Refugee & Immigration Services office in Columbia. Both of them work with refugees on a daily basis and are from Iraq themselves. They spoke about the need for more mental health care within the refugee and immigrant communities – especially when it comes to dealing with PTSD.

Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org

AP Photo

Tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims have fled Myanmar in recent months amidst a campaign by the South Asian nation's military against the religious minority.

Refugees have told rights groups and U.N. investigators of burned villages, summary executions and mass rapes of women and girls. About 70,000 refugees have arrived in neighboring Bangladesh since October.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at a major human rights crisis that is tarnishing the legacy of Nobel prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's democracy icon turned state counselor.

(EPA)

Picture a city of about 300,000 people - something the size of Tampa, Fla. or Riverside, Calif.

Now picture all of those people in this city being told it’s being closed down and they have to move.

That’s what the Kenyan government in East Africa is trying to do with the 340,000 people who live in Dadaab, the world’s largest refugee camp. Built 24 years ago by the U.N. to house people fleeing Somalia's civil war, many of the people living there today have never set foot in Somalia and don't want to go back. 


AP

For months now, the world has watched as more than a million refugees and migrants from countries like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan have risked their lives to try and find safe haven in Europe.

But this influx has created enormous tensions in the European Union about how many newcomers to accept and which countries should take them. Governments in Sweden and Germany have each taken in hundreds of thousands of refugees and migrants–and taken criticism both from other European states and their own people.

So, who foots the bill for settling the hundreds of thousands of immigrants? And if no one, where will these people go?


AP

Eritrea is sometimes described as "the North Korea of Africa." And it's a deserved title.

The tiny nation, located on the continent’s northeastern coast bordering Ethiopia, Sudan, and Djibouti is ranked dead last out of 180 countries on Reporters’ Without Borders’ World Press Freedom Index. All privately-owned media outlets were shuttered more than a decade ago. In 2015, Eritreans were by far the largest source of African migrants making the dangerous Mediterranean crossing into Europe.