regulation

Three very different stories illustrate the common -- and deepening -- fault line that news, sports, entertainment media and higher education are trying desperately to straddle.   Every word, every video clip, every invited speaker, every programming decision is viewed through the hyper-partisan lens of pro-Trump and anti-Trump activists.  On this week's episode of Views of the News we discuss Sean Spicer, Chelsea Manning and ESPN's Jemele Hill.  Plus a look at the new Ken Burns documentary on the Vietnam War.  

Inviting Spicer to the Emmys

The Cost Behind Nice Nails

May 14, 2015
via Flickr user madame.furie

The New York Times published an investigative piece on the high price of cheap nails. The article quickly got people to think twice about bargain salons, and regulation changes are already underway. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

It’s planting time for Midwest farmers and much of the corn they grow will end up feeding livestock in China, which has become a huge importer of grain from the Corn Belt. That means the farmers can’t just select seeds based on which ones will get the best yield. They have to think about where their grain will be sold.

China has its own rules for the kind of crops it wants and when American farmers don’t comply, China can close off its market.

In 2013, China discovered in U.S. corn a genetically engineered trait that, although permitted in the U.S., had not yet been approved in China. Chinese regulators rejected American corn because some of it contained the trait.

“When you hear China has banned all US corn,” said Ward Graham, a farmer in South-Central Iowa, “a person in my position? That’s not good.”


By Gregory F. Maxwell / Wikimedia commons

Legislation rewriting Missouri's payday loan laws has been vetoed by Gov. Jay Nixon because he says it falls short of "true reform."

Borrowers in Missouri currently can renew a payday loan up to six times and can face interest rates as high as 75 percent of the loan's original amount.

SkiStar / Flickr

Legislation pending before Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon would require new oversight of some unlicensed child care centers.