special session | KBIA

special session

Courtesy of Angela Kender

More than 1,200 Missourians have died from COVID-19 since the first confirmed case back in March. With new data and every day, the human aspect of that loss can get lost in the numbers. Angela Kender is looking to change that.

After losing her mother to COVID-19 in June, Kender has decided to organize a project to commemorate her, and everyone else who has lost loved ones to the disease. She’s collecting photographs of those lost at missouricovidmemorial@gmail.com. Kender plans to take the photographs to the Missouri state capitol during the current legislative special session.

File Photo / KBIA

A recent special legislative session on abortion policies cost Missouri taxpayers nearly $92,000.

Figures provided to The Associated Press show the House spent about $60,000 and the Senate nearly $32,000 on the session that ran from mid-June to late July.

The session resulted in a new law that will tighten abortion regulations, give the attorney general power to prosecute violations and exempt pregnancy resource centers from a St. Louis ordinance banning discrimination based on "reproductive health decisions."

david_shane / Flickr

Pro-abortion rights supporters are rallying at the Missouri Capitol in opposition to Republican proposals to further regulate the procedure.

Roughly 200 people gathered in the Rotunda on Wednesday as the Republican-led Senate prepared to take up legislation that would, among other things, require annual inspections for abortion clinics and nullify a St. Louis ordinance prohibiting discrimination in hiring or housing based on reproductive decisions.

When it goes into its second special session Monday, the Missouri General Assembly will focus on a frequent — and arguably, favorite — target: local control.

On issues ranging from gun rights to anti-discrimination regulations, Republican leaders have made it clear that they believe there should be a consistent law across Missouri. That’s why since 2007, they’ve approved bills to bar communities from enacting stricter gun laws, overturned Kansas City’s higher minimum wage (there’s an action pending against St. Louis’ higher wage, too), and tossed out Columbia’s plastic bag ban.

Updated 7:45 p.m. May 22  with number of bills filed Monday – On the eve of his first legislative special session, Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens and his allied nonprofit group are attacking one of the pivotal legislators  needed to win approval of the governor’s favored bill.

The nonprofit group is called A New Missouri and can collect unlimited donations from unidentified donors. It is targeting state Sen. Doug Libla, a Republican whose southeast Missouri district includes the now-closed aluminum smelting plant that Greitens hopes to reopen, along with a possible steel mill.

Libla says he supports the projects. But the senator questions some provisions in the expected special-session bill that he says could reduce state oversight over Ameren, which provides electricity to much of eastern Missouri.

Gov. Jay Nixon plans to call a special session of the Missouri General Assembly to pay for the Missouri National Guard and Missouri Highway Patrol’s operations in Ferguson and the St. Louis region. 

It’s a move that comes amid immense disapproval of how the governor handled the aftermath of a grand jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson Police officer Darren Wilson for shooting and killing Michael Brown.

So far, there has not been a ground swell of support for the idea of a special legislative session in Missouri to pass an alternate version of the tax cut bill vetoed earlier this year by Governor Jay Nixon (D).

Business Beat: Nov. 2, 2011

Nov 2, 2011
Adventurer Dustin Holmes / Flickr

This week: Special Session ended last week with many questions still unanswered, and farmers are doing everything they can to hold on to government subsidies for crop insurance.